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November 17, 1982     Journal Opinion
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November 17, 1982-The Journal Opinion.Page 5 of Mrs. classes to Boston on They went to of Fine Arts and 13 the flea sponsored by the was very suc- are planning to flea market Honor Society to have Judy Normandin as a guest speaker at our meeting on Wednesday Nov. 17, concerning Easter Seals. The Honor Society will also sponsor a food sale on Saturday Nov. 20 at Ames Department Store. Woodsville High School will hold its annual open house on Wednesday Nov. 17. There will be a brief concert by the Woodsville High School band and chorus. Everyone is welcome to attend. On Nov. 30, the Harlem Wizards with Marques Haynes will be coming to the Wood- sville Community building to challenge the Woodsville All- Stars to a game of basketball. Tickets are being sold in advance and at the door. The Woodsville High School basketball teams have started practice. Both the boys and girls varsity teams will be participating in a jamboree at White Mountain on Nov. 20. |{Nlf ............................................ JUDY AUGUSTINE $1mff ............................................. LISA FAIOIKtM KATHERINE HARTLEY SANDY PERRY KIM STOO(WIELL [=THANNE WRIGHT Mvlu ............ ............................... ARNOLD SHIELD5 Cmtdlmte .......................................... JIM CORLISS LORA FENNER News is to begin recruiting 1982-83 school the staff consists and one junior. underclassmen staff, there is a that the will cease to 1983-84 school :the Oxbow News have created a that keeps aware of the at Oxbow We five seniors hate to see the fold next on Cannot survive. junior, or Would like to be for membership on either _ or Judy o that an interview Valley Music to be held on Nov. The concert is on 1982 at Norwich both the hand for the festival ort Oct. 23, 1982 at High School in The auditions all Vermont high who par- students from School were chorus: Robert z, placed second; soprano, ; Jody Hodge, 24th; and soprano, the students were seats, the first person the best in the results are as , baritone, Grow, trum- Ryan Grow, seat; Bethanne clarinet, second clarinet, and Joyce Act Plays on Friday, Nov, at Oxbow in, grades 9-12, their annual class play painting, Bigfoot," is drama, directed by Thomas Kidder. This play is about the dying Moose Lodge and Canoe Rental where Bigfoot is sited. The major characters are Moose Wise, owner of the lodge, played by Ben Davis; Gayle Balcom plays Penny Wise, his daughter; and the local Sheriff Renfrew is played by Scott Allard. Bruce MacLean is directing the sophomore one-act play, "The Little Red Schoolhouse." It is about an old-time one room schoolhouse and the problems the teacher goes through. Sherri Tomlinson plays the leading role "of the school teacher, Mary Bron-+ son. "Snowy White and the Dwarfs," directed by Irene Croteau will be put on by the junior class. It is an updated version of the famous fairy tale, with the dwarfs being members of the rock group "The Clash." The punkish Snowy White is played by Kris Search. Her Prince, played by Melvin Emerson, is the punk rock singer Prince Slug. Greg Renner directs "Whatever Happened to Fergus McFee," the senior class play. It deals with the search for Fergus McFee after he mysteriously disappears. The lead, played by David Stever, is an officer from the pentagon named Callow who leads the search. Lights and sound will be done by Kurt Wakefield, .soph. omore, and Larry Russ, lumor. Admission prices are $1.25 for adults and 75 cents for students. Money taken in at the door will be divided between the classes who put on a production. Refreshments will be sold by the Drama Club. Senior of the Week Senior of the week is Christie Thurston. Thurston plans to major in liberal arts at college with some creative writing classes, dance and possibly some art. She is applying to the University+ of Bridgeport, Castleton College, Hartwick College, and University of Vermont. Awards that Thurston has received while at Oxbow are, the Humanities Award in ninth grade, and Honorsry Cheerleading Captain as a junior. Her activities and hobbies include; cheerleading, drawing, dance classes, one act plays, and you t continued from page 4) craslms and 329 are seriously injured. The through 24 years of age are the only group who life expectancy in America. All other age expectancy has increased dramatically in the Think of all the fuss about Tylenol capsules. died? Eight. Here we have 14 teenagers killed can do something about it, if we care to. year, I will be putting on what we call a Mini in every high school in Orange County. Four half sessions are involved and in the end a test they pass, they could pass the regular CRASH main emphasis is on awareness and what drinking is all about; also the risk involved, as out of 10 people who drink become alcoholics of 10 will become, problem drinkers -- while the will drink normally. Four of the Orange have Mini CRASH Course in their budgets. thanks to Fran Weinhaum, who wrote a grant so able to have the course presented, are also in this program; and next year they will in- in their budgets. month I've had the privilege of putting on a for the State Police. We showed them what make the arrest as far as CRASH goes. "We need better enforcement". Now L. Jim Patten and his great crew of officers DWI arrests in the State are up 60 ago, I received a letter from a man with a -- signed, "Pint a Day". Last week I from the same man -- signed, "Quart a things haven't gotten better. We will deal. See Ya, Uncle Milty Nov. 15 -- 6:30 p.m. oo Sat.. Nov. 20 at 6:30 p.m. photography, and the Talent Show. Her suggestions lfto un- derclassmen are, you're going to participate in the talent show, start early t" She adds the same for sports. She says that yon should always defend your friends and she hopes for the younger students that Oxbow will never give up the Winter Carnival. Soviet Union, Journalism, American Literature, and Media are courses that Thurston wishes she had taken during her years at Oxbow. She also wishes that she had taken Photography in ninth grade instead of as a senior. The worst thing about Oxbow she says is that "Peer pressure is ton heavy and the status quo is too highly regarded." Thurston attributes alot of her success as a student to her guidance counselor, Betty Moore, and wants to thank her for all of her help and guidance, over the years. Open House On Wednesday, Nov. 10, 1982, the 12th annual open house was held at Oxbow High School. All of the Oxbow teachers were on hand and available for questions and comments, as were the guidance Coun- selors. Parents were also able to make appointments to have individual conferences with their child's teachers or counselors. Parent-teacher conferences were held on Thursday, Nov. 11 and Friday, Nov. 12. Entertainment for the evening was provided by the Oxbow Senior High Band and Chorus, Junior High Band and Chorus, and the Oxbow Jazz Ensemble. Each group per- formed three musical selections. F.B.L.A. Future Business Leaders of America  (FBLA) is the national organization for all high school students par- ticipating in business and office programs. "The purpose of the FBLA club is to provide, an tegral part of the instructional program, additional op- portunities for secondary students in business and office education to develop vocational and career sup- portive competencies and to promote civil and personal responsibility," according to the national FBLA Handbook. The goals of the FBLA club are to develop competent, aggressive business leader- ship, strengthen the con- fidence of students in them- selves and their work, create more interest in and un- derstanding of American business enterprise, en- courage and practice efficient school loyalty, assist students in the establishment of ec- cupational goals, and facilitate the transition from school to work. The 1982 members of the Oxbow FBLA are: Dwayna Smith, Tena Davidson, Kathy Claflin, Rose Oliver, Dawn Williams, Lisa Farnham, Tammy Sarazin, Matt Sargent, Bethanne Wright, and Jennifer Benjamin. The advisor for the FBLA is Elizabeth Balch, of the Oxbow Business Department. FBLA club goes to the Eastern Regional Conference, and the fall regional con- ference. The club has traveled to conferences that are Regional, State, and National. In recent years the Oxbow FBLA has been represented at conferences in Washington, Denver, and San Francisco. The FBLA raises money by having food sales, raffles, spaghetti suppers and a Talent Show. The group is also involved in doing charity work for old people and children in the hospital. They help Student Council Formed This fall marks the re- formation of a student council at Tbetford Academy. A student council has been absent from the campus for the last two years, but it has been revived because many feel it will improve com- munication between students and the administration. In order to plan and discuss the formation of an active student council, a committee of six faculty members was created. The group drew up recommendations outlining the format for student representation. The main purposes of the student council will be to serve as an advisory council to make recommendations to students, faculty, ad- ministration, and trustees. The council will also listen to grievances made by students, and help to strengthen existing student organizations. If the TA student council can accurately accomplish the ideas discussed, it will be off to a flying start and might gain credibility with students, which is a factor with any student organization. Primary elections for student representation were held last Thursday. Elections will be held Wednesday, Nov. 17th. Activities Galore This year at Thetford programs. It was purchased using a matching fund grant in which the state and federal governments put up three quarters and TA contributed one quarter. The Apple will be used in business courses for word processing, proofreading, and accounting. Agricultural courses will use it for stimulating production and record keeping, while students in computer classes will create programs for it. The Apple II + computer joins the Radio Shack TRS-80 computer which TA pur- chased in 1979. The two computers are similar in that they beth use the Basic computer language, but the new Apple has a larger memory and performs fun- ctions quicker than the TRS- 80. The Apple has a disc drive while the TRS-80 has a cassette recording system. Mr. Robert Crossett, math and computer teacher, is designing a workshop to ex- plain the functions of the Apple to the business department. At the end of the first semester, the Apple will be moved to a now location more accessible to business and agricultural classes. Thetford Academy looks forward to expanding its computer facilities in the near future. Founders' Day Theme Sought Founders' Day at TA is a very special event and Newburv School News Hausman commended for Festival by GERRY BROOKS tax collector has not been type and use the adding Permission slips for NEWBURY-- In action at" following the established and machine, listen to stories on students to go on trips are not their recent meeting, the agreed-upon schedule of the tape recorders and play'tecessary. Parents are Newbury School Board said no keeping the board informed, chess. Each student can hotified in writing prior to word has yet been received to The selectmen believe the receive a 35-40 minute "TC such trips. enable negotiations between problem can only be resolved period" weekly. Sanborn Finally, the board reviewed the teachers and the board to by the voters electing a new added that no student is kept finances, voting to .borr+Jw commence. Also, figures will tax collector at the annual in from recess except as a $32,000 in anticipation of taxfm be sent to the Vermont School school meeting. They ap- normal outcome of a and signed orders for Board Association Insurance pointed a committee to look discipline problem, payment. Trust for analysis to deter- into the possibility of electing mine if the local board would a combination town treasurer- be better covered by them for tax collector. unemployment insurance. The question arose as to who Principal John Sanborn had authorized the school bus reported the following: The to travel up Tucker Mountain Heritage Festival was a huge Road to the Clark residence. success, and Emmy Hausman This could not be ascertained, is to be commended for her although it appeared perhaps fine organization and it automatically had become leadership; fire dampers have part of the basic route. The been installed in the boiler board, however, was not in room; parent-teacher con- favor of this, and Carson will ferences have been request the Oxbow Board to scheduled; all teachers' remove the Tucker Mountain evaluations are completed; run from the basic route. curriculum work continues Principal John Sanborn with the staff, with mapping of clarified some points for units taught within each board members. Concerning discipline -- these units to be homework, too much drill broken into objectives soon; homework is counter- and Bob Higgins presented productive and is puppet workshops through the discouraged. Homework that Orange East Arts Council. can be applied is encouraged. The beard voted to establish Great care should be taken in a Principal's checking ac- assigning homework. In no count for necessities oc- way has Sanborn stated there curring between board will be no homework. meetings and for in-house The tutorial center periods accounts, with $200 allotted, offer time This account will be subject to make up a yearly audit., educational TV and In response to a question from Steve Holt, Superin- tendent John Fontana assured the board that every effort is made by him and Assistant INTERESTING FACT Superintendent Rufus Ansley According to the AMA, to touch base on items brushing your hair 100 discussed and requests made strokes a day won't do it any at board meetings after the good and may even harm it. meetings are held. Much discussion was held concerning an audit. No of- SAVE I FaCTOnV] , COPELAND 0 OUTLET nn lip'S. Iql-qNov. 26.27,28. Dec. 3+4 ..10.11,12,17,18, 1 [ 0NM05TInMS II RT. 25 BRADFORD, VT. 222-4771 J PEN HOUSE\\; f00v Sr00'd enfi00 i / Fd. & Sat., Nov. 19th & 20th 10 A.M.- 5 P.M. L Refreshments, Door Prize & Get Acquainted Savings / On Our Fine Holiday Gift Selections. See Our Antique Fords! Academy a new activity period replaces the regular 8th period class. This program gives kidra chance to take part in 17 extracurricular offerings during the school day ranging from mind games to photography. Popular choices are chorus, drama, driver education, fitness and art projects. Eighth period activity also allows existing clubs and organizations such as F.B.L.A., F.F.A. and student council to hold periodic meetings. At the end of each quarter students are able to change the choice of their activity so that they can try something different. The kids seem to like this. They see it as a good way to get clubs and organizations together. Students who do not wish to be involved in an activity either go to study hall or go home. Two-thirds of the student body participate in the 8th period program. The new change allows activities to take place and clubs to meet without interrupting classes. An Apple Today at TA Thetford Academy recently was the recipient of a new Apple II plus computer for its business and agricultural parents out when there are teacher conferences. The officers are Bethanne Wright, President; Lisa Farnham, Vice-president; Tammy Sarazin, Secretary; Tena Davidson, Treasurer; Matt Sargent, parliamen- tarian; and Kathy Claflin, reporter. VICA Buddy Welch of Newbury, Vt. was elected President of the afternoon Automotives Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA) club. VICA is a club for high school students in a vocational class. VICA sponsors contests so that students can sharpen their skill with hands-on training and written tests. Welch wants to be president because he feels that he will enjoy having the respon- sibility and he also thinks being president will help him in the future, like at school and town meetings. Welch holds a meeting every Wednesday during Automotives class with all the members. He maintains order while the members vote on old business and new business. VICA presently has $49.35 in its treasury. Welch hopes to raise money by doing car washes and by selling cord wood. Membership dues are $5.50 per year. Eleven members are in the afternoon class. Joel Moore, automotives teacher at Oxbow, is the advisor. Other officers are Vice President-- Mike Gendren and Secretary- Treasurer-- David Bixby. INTERESTING FACT In Tahiti the temperature rarely rises above 94 degrees F., even in the summer months of February and March. traditionally has been celebrated enthusiastically by students and community at the end of January since the Academy started hack in 1819. Each year a theme is selected for the celebration and is carried out in six competitive categories. Seventh vs. eighth, ninth vs. tenth, eleventh vs. twelfth grade classes compete for points in the following areas: snow sculptures, winter games, dramatic skits, creative table settings, and artistic murals and head- pieces. Prizes to the winning classes are awarded at an all school banquet. . This year to enlist early interest in the celebration, the journalism class conducted a student poll asking for theme suggestions. Some of the outstanding ones were: colonial life, life in the future and transportation submitted by Todd Bragg. Shawn Ricker offered TA Supermarket as ficial audit has been made for three years, and Dee Drugach felt the board should wait until the end of the current school year and then have a four- year audit. Various opinions were expressed, with the board deciding to review the situation in January. Chairman Russ Carson reported on a meeting he and Drugach attended with the Selectmen. It appears both groups have the same problems concerning tax collection and reporting. The his suggestion. Kim Crossley had three good ones: the year 2000, caveman days and the civil war. Several students suggested ET comes to TA, TA goes punk, TA goes to the movies and lastly, TA and the 50's. The theme will be chosen by Thanksgiving. ii PRINCIPAL'S VIEW by RICHARD ROTHENBERG Principal, Oxbow High School Recreatin00 the Spirit of the Little Red School House Some of us look back with considerable fondness to the dav of the little red schoolhouse. The nostalgia and romance surrounding it remind us of the "good old days." The truth, however, is that very few of these schoolhouses were red -- and many of them + were not particularly good. Teachers were often poorly trained. In fact, few teachers had achieved an educational level much past the grade level they taught. Teaching materials were practically nonexistent and most of these schools contained only a small number of books and learning sources. Yet, many children mastered reading, writing, arithmetic, and other necessary skills in these schools of the past. The little red schoolhouse was relatively inexpensive to operate, nearby, and reasonably effective in teaching basic skills, It also contained an element that today's schools often lack: Parents who had children in these schools were deeply in- volved. In fact, it was not at all unusual for the entire community to turn out for a school program honoring a special occasion. And, certainly, nearly everyone came to the annual "pie" or "box" supper and the last day of school activities. These events attracted enthusiastic crowds that overflowed the little school. The community attended school activities because they were often "the only game in town." There were few other diversions in those days. People were not forced to make a choice between a school function and some more enticing social activity. Today, parents are every bit as interested in their children as in the days of the little red schoolhouse, perhaps even more so. Unfortunately, however, other activities often appear more attractice than school functions. A common sight today at most sports contests, concerts, plays and other school activities is parents who drive up to the school, unload their children, and drive off, only to return to pick them up when the activity has ended. Ybt, such action on the part of parents can be more dangerous than surface observation may indicate. It may say to their children that they do not consider the school and its activities very interesting or important. And it takes little insight to realize that our children tend to take seriously only those things that we adults consider important. This is especially true when the adults are parents. De we really want to return to the day of the little red schoolhouse? No, not even if we could. We can, however, recreate the spirit of the little red schoolhouse by engaging in our children's school activities to the greatest extent possible. The single major advantage the one-room school had over today's modern schools was parental involvement, interest, and support. There was no other magic in that little school. Just know that parents are both as welcome and as needed in the schools today as they were in the little red schoolhouse of the past. We need your interest. We need your involvement and so do your children. INTERESTING FACT A hippopotamus has a skin an inch and a half thick -- too thick for most bullets to penetrate. DIAMONDS . WATCHES We Repair ACCUTRON, TIMEX ....... _00P00A2 Ma"_'_s _+ HASKELL JEWELERS L,ttleton, NH 03561 [003) 444- 31,$1 on the common Haverhill, START NOWIll Club CHOOSE THE PLAN THAT SUITS YOU BEST $1.00- $2.00- $3.00 $5.00-$10.00 - $20.00 - $25.00 GUARANTEED REBATE NEXT . . . &eewe W#'t00 in eks00el FREE GIFT IF YOU START NOWtt Open a Christmas Club at $1.00 or more and receive a FREE Tea or Coffee Canister to enhance your kitchen. BRADFORD NATIONAL BANK Member Federal Depos+t Insurance CorDorallop Thalor 785-2112 Newry 8e f72 Deposits Insured To $100,000 November 17, 1982-The Journal Opinion.Page 5 of Mrs. classes to Boston on They went to of Fine Arts and 13 the flea sponsored by the was very suc- are planning to flea market Honor Society to have Judy Normandin as a guest speaker at our meeting on Wednesday Nov. 17, concerning Easter Seals. The Honor Society will also sponsor a food sale on Saturday Nov. 20 at Ames Department Store. Woodsville High School will hold its annual open house on Wednesday Nov. 17. There will be a brief concert by the Woodsville High School band and chorus. Everyone is welcome to attend. On Nov. 30, the Harlem Wizards with Marques Haynes will be coming to the Wood- sville Community building to challenge the Woodsville All- Stars to a game of basketball. Tickets are being sold in advance and at the door. The Woodsville High School basketball teams have started practice. Both the boys and girls varsity teams will be participating in a jamboree at White Mountain on Nov. 20. |{Nlf ............................................ JUDY AUGUSTINE $1mff ............................................. LISA FAIOIKtM KATHERINE HARTLEY SANDY PERRY KIM STOO(WIELL [=THANNE WRIGHT Mvlu ............ ............................... ARNOLD SHIELD5 Cmtdlmte .......................................... JIM CORLISS LORA FENNER News is to begin recruiting 1982-83 school the staff consists and one junior. underclassmen staff, there is a that the will cease to 1983-84 school :the Oxbow News have created a that keeps aware of the at Oxbow We five seniors hate to see the fold next on Cannot survive. junior, or Would like to be for membership on either _ or Judy o that an interview Valley Music to be held on Nov. The concert is on 1982 at Norwich both the hand for the festival ort Oct. 23, 1982 at High School in The auditions all Vermont high who par- students from School were chorus: Robert z, placed second; soprano, ; Jody Hodge, 24th; and soprano, the students were seats, the first person the best in the results are as , baritone, Grow, trum- Ryan Grow, seat; Bethanne clarinet, second clarinet, and Joyce Act Plays on Friday, Nov, at Oxbow in, grades 9-12, their annual class play painting, Bigfoot," is drama, directed by Thomas Kidder. This play is about the dying Moose Lodge and Canoe Rental where Bigfoot is sited. The major characters are Moose Wise, owner of the lodge, played by Ben Davis; Gayle Balcom plays Penny Wise, his daughter; and the local Sheriff Renfrew is played by Scott Allard. Bruce MacLean is directing the sophomore one-act play, "The Little Red Schoolhouse." It is about an old-time one room schoolhouse and the problems the teacher goes through. Sherri Tomlinson plays the leading role "of the school teacher, Mary Bron-+ son. "Snowy White and the Dwarfs," directed by Irene Croteau will be put on by the junior class. It is an updated version of the famous fairy tale, with the dwarfs being members of the rock group "The Clash." The punkish Snowy White is played by Kris Search. Her Prince, played by Melvin Emerson, is the punk rock singer Prince Slug. Greg Renner directs "Whatever Happened to Fergus McFee," the senior class play. It deals with the search for Fergus McFee after he mysteriously disappears. The lead, played by David Stever, is an officer from the pentagon named Callow who leads the search. Lights and sound will be done by Kurt Wakefield, .soph. omore, and Larry Russ, lumor. Admission prices are $1.25 for adults and 75 cents for students. Money taken in at the door will be divided between the classes who put on a production. Refreshments will be sold by the Drama Club. Senior of the Week Senior of the week is Christie Thurston. Thurston plans to major in liberal arts at college with some creative writing classes, dance and possibly some art. She is applying to the University+ of Bridgeport, Castleton College, Hartwick College, and University of Vermont. Awards that Thurston has received while at Oxbow are, the Humanities Award in ninth grade, and Honorsry Cheerleading Captain as a junior. Her activities and hobbies include; cheerleading, drawing, dance classes, one act plays, and you t continued from page 4) craslms and 329 are seriously injured. The through 24 years of age are the only group who life expectancy in America. All other age expectancy has increased dramatically in the Think of all the fuss about Tylenol capsules. died? Eight. Here we have 14 teenagers killed can do something about it, if we care to. year, I will be putting on what we call a Mini in every high school in Orange County. Four half sessions are involved and in the end a test they pass, they could pass the regular CRASH main emphasis is on awareness and what drinking is all about; also the risk involved, as out of 10 people who drink become alcoholics of 10 will become, problem drinkers -- while the will drink normally. Four of the Orange have Mini CRASH Course in their budgets. thanks to Fran Weinhaum, who wrote a grant so able to have the course presented, are also in this program; and next year they will in- in their budgets. month I've had the privilege of putting on a for the State Police. We showed them what make the arrest as far as CRASH goes. "We need better enforcement". Now L. Jim Patten and his great crew of officers DWI arrests in the State are up 60 ago, I received a letter from a man with a -- signed, "Pint a Day". Last week I from the same man -- signed, "Quart a things haven't gotten better. We will deal. See Ya, Uncle Milty Nov. 15 -- 6:30 p.m. oo Sat.. Nov. 20 at 6:30 p.m. photography, and the Talent Show. Her suggestions lfto un- derclassmen are, you're going to participate in the talent show, start early t" She adds the same for sports. She says that yon should always defend your friends and she hopes for the younger students that Oxbow will never give up the Winter Carnival. Soviet Union, Journalism, American Literature, and Media are courses that Thurston wishes she had taken during her years at Oxbow. She also wishes that she had taken Photography in ninth grade instead of as a senior. The worst thing about Oxbow she says is that "Peer pressure is ton heavy and the status quo is too highly regarded." Thurston attributes alot of her success as a student to her guidance counselor, Betty Moore, and wants to thank her for all of her help and guidance, over the years. Open House On Wednesday, Nov. 10, 1982, the 12th annual open house was held at Oxbow High School. All of the Oxbow teachers were on hand and available for questions and comments, as were the guidance Coun- selors. Parents were also able to make appointments to have individual conferences with their child's teachers or counselors. Parent-teacher conferences were held on Thursday, Nov. 11 and Friday, Nov. 12. Entertainment for the evening was provided by the Oxbow Senior High Band and Chorus, Junior High Band and Chorus, and the Oxbow Jazz Ensemble. Each group per- formed three musical selections. F.B.L.A. Future Business Leaders of America  (FBLA) is the national organization for all high school students par- ticipating in business and office programs. "The purpose of the FBLA club is to provide, an tegral part of the instructional program, additional op- portunities for secondary students in business and office education to develop vocational and career sup- portive competencies and to promote civil and personal responsibility," according to the national FBLA Handbook. The goals of the FBLA club are to develop competent, aggressive business leader- ship, strengthen the con- fidence of students in them- selves and their work, create more interest in and un- derstanding of American business enterprise, en- courage and practice efficient school loyalty, assist students in the establishment of ec- cupational goals, and facilitate the transition from school to work. The 1982 members of the Oxbow FBLA are: Dwayna Smith, Tena Davidson, Kathy Claflin, Rose Oliver, Dawn Williams, Lisa Farnham, Tammy Sarazin, Matt Sargent, Bethanne Wright, and Jennifer Benjamin. The advisor for the FBLA is Elizabeth Balch, of the Oxbow Business Department. FBLA club goes to the Eastern Regional Conference, and the fall regional con- ference. The club has traveled to conferences that are Regional, State, and National. In recent years the Oxbow FBLA has been represented at conferences in Washington, Denver, and San Francisco. The FBLA raises money by having food sales, raffles, spaghetti suppers and a Talent Show. The group is also involved in doing charity work for old people and children in the hospital. They help Student Council Formed This fall marks the re- formation of a student council at Tbetford Academy. A student council has been absent from the campus for the last two years, but it has been revived because many feel it will improve com- munication between students and the administration. In order to plan and discuss the formation of an active student council, a committee of six faculty members was created. The group drew up recommendations outlining the format for student representation. The main purposes of the student council will be to serve as an advisory council to make recommendations to students, faculty, ad- ministration, and trustees. The council will also listen to grievances made by students, and help to strengthen existing student organizations. If the TA student council can accurately accomplish the ideas discussed, it will be off to a flying start and might gain credibility with students, which is a factor with any student organization. Primary elections for student representation were held last Thursday. Elections will be held Wednesday, Nov. 17th. Activities Galore This year at Thetford programs. It was purchased using a matching fund grant in which the state and federal governments put up three quarters and TA contributed one quarter. The Apple will be used in business courses for word processing, proofreading, and accounting. Agricultural courses will use it for stimulating production and record keeping, while students in computer classes will create programs for it. The Apple II + computer joins the Radio Shack TRS-80 computer which TA pur- chased in 1979. The two computers are similar in that they beth use the Basic computer language, but the new Apple has a larger memory and performs fun- ctions quicker than the TRS- 80. The Apple has a disc drive while the TRS-80 has a cassette recording system. Mr. Robert Crossett, math and computer teacher, is designing a workshop to ex- plain the functions of the Apple to the business department. At the end of the first semester, the Apple will be moved to a now location more accessible to business and agricultural classes. Thetford Academy looks forward to expanding its computer facilities in the near future. Founders' Day Theme Sought Founders' Day at TA is a very special event and Newburv School News Hausman commended for Festival by GERRY BROOKS tax collector has not been type and use the adding Permission slips for NEWBURY-- In action at" following the established and machine, listen to stories on students to go on trips are not their recent meeting, the agreed-upon schedule of the tape recorders and play'tecessary. Parents are Newbury School Board said no keeping the board informed, chess. Each student can hotified in writing prior to word has yet been received to The selectmen believe the receive a 35-40 minute "TC such trips. enable negotiations between problem can only be resolved period" weekly. Sanborn Finally, the board reviewed the teachers and the board to by the voters electing a new added that no student is kept finances, voting to .borr+Jw commence. Also, figures will tax collector at the annual in from recess except as a $32,000 in anticipation of taxfm be sent to the Vermont School school meeting. They ap- normal outcome of a and signed orders for Board Association Insurance pointed a committee to look discipline problem, payment. Trust for analysis to deter- into the possibility of electing mine if the local board would a combination town treasurer- be better covered by them for tax collector. unemployment insurance. The question arose as to who Principal John Sanborn had authorized the school bus reported the following: The to travel up Tucker Mountain Heritage Festival was a huge Road to the Clark residence. success, and Emmy Hausman This could not be ascertained, is to be commended for her although it appeared perhaps fine organization and it automatically had become leadership; fire dampers have part of the basic route. The been installed in the boiler board, however, was not in room; parent-teacher con- favor of this, and Carson will ferences have been request the Oxbow Board to scheduled; all teachers' remove the Tucker Mountain evaluations are completed; run from the basic route. curriculum work continues Principal John Sanborn with the staff, with mapping of clarified some points for units taught within each board members. Concerning discipline -- these units to be homework, too much drill broken into objectives soon; homework is counter- and Bob Higgins presented productive and is puppet workshops through the discouraged. Homework that Orange East Arts Council. can be applied is encouraged. The beard voted to establish Great care should be taken in a Principal's checking ac- assigning homework. In no count for necessities oc- way has Sanborn stated there curring between board will be no homework. meetings and for in-house The tutorial center periods accounts, with $200 allotted, offer time This account will be subject to make up a yearly audit., educational TV and In response to a question from Steve Holt, Superin- tendent John Fontana assured the board that every effort is made by him and Assistant INTERESTING FACT Superintendent Rufus Ansley According to the AMA, to touch base on items brushing your hair 100 discussed and requests made strokes a day won't do it any at board meetings after the good and may even harm it. meetings are held. Much discussion was held concerning an audit. No of- SAVE I FaCTOnV] , COPELAND 0 OUTLET nn lip'S. Iql-qNov. 26.27,28. Dec. 3+4 ..10.11,12,17,18, 1 [ 0NM05TInMS II RT. 25 BRADFORD, VT. 222-4771 J PEN HOUSE\\; f00v Sr00'd enfi00 i / Fd. & Sat., Nov. 19th & 20th 10 A.M.- 5 P.M. L Refreshments, Door Prize & Get Acquainted Savings / On Our Fine Holiday Gift Selections. See Our Antique Fords! Academy a new activity period replaces the regular 8th period class. This program gives kidra chance to take part in 17 extracurricular offerings during the school day ranging from mind games to photography. Popular choices are chorus, drama, driver education, fitness and art projects. Eighth period activity also allows existing clubs and organizations such as F.B.L.A., F.F.A. and student council to hold periodic meetings. At the end of each quarter students are able to change the choice of their activity so that they can try something different. The kids seem to like this. They see it as a good way to get clubs and organizations together. Students who do not wish to be involved in an activity either go to study hall or go home. Two-thirds of the student body participate in the 8th period program. The new change allows activities to take place and clubs to meet without interrupting classes. An Apple Today at TA Thetford Academy recently was the recipient of a new Apple II plus computer for its business and agricultural parents out when there are teacher conferences. The officers are Bethanne Wright, President; Lisa Farnham, Vice-president; Tammy Sarazin, Secretary; Tena Davidson, Treasurer; Matt Sargent, parliamen- tarian; and Kathy Claflin, reporter. VICA Buddy Welch of Newbury, Vt. was elected President of the afternoon Automotives Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA) club. VICA is a club for high school students in a vocational class. VICA sponsors contests so that students can sharpen their skill with hands-on training and written tests. Welch wants to be president because he feels that he will enjoy having the respon- sibility and he also thinks being president will help him in the future, like at school and town meetings. Welch holds a meeting every Wednesday during Automotives class with all the members. He maintains order while the members vote on old business and new business. VICA presently has $49.35 in its treasury. Welch hopes to raise money by doing car washes and by selling cord wood. Membership dues are $5.50 per year. Eleven members are in the afternoon class. Joel Moore, automotives teacher at Oxbow, is the advisor. Other officers are Vice President-- Mike Gendren and Secretary- Treasurer-- David Bixby. INTERESTING FACT In Tahiti the temperature rarely rises above 94 degrees F., even in the summer months of February and March. traditionally has been celebrated enthusiastically by students and community at the end of January since the Academy started hack in 1819. Each year a theme is selected for the celebration and is carried out in six competitive categories. Seventh vs. eighth, ninth vs. tenth, eleventh vs. twelfth grade classes compete for points in the following areas: snow sculptures, winter games, dramatic skits, creative table settings, and artistic murals and head- pieces. Prizes to the winning classes are awarded at an all school banquet. . This year to enlist early interest in the celebration, the journalism class conducted a student poll asking for theme suggestions. Some of the outstanding ones were: colonial life, life in the future and transportation submitted by Todd Bragg. Shawn Ricker offered TA Supermarket as ficial audit has been made for three years, and Dee Drugach felt the board should wait until the end of the current school year and then have a four- year audit. Various opinions were expressed, with the board deciding to review the situation in January. Chairman Russ Carson reported on a meeting he and Drugach attended with the Selectmen. It appears both groups have the same problems concerning tax collection and reporting. The his suggestion. Kim Crossley had three good ones: the year 2000, caveman days and the civil war. Several students suggested ET comes to TA, TA goes punk, TA goes to the movies and lastly, TA and the 50's. The theme will be chosen by Thanksgiving. ii PRINCIPAL'S VIEW by RICHARD ROTHENBERG Principal, Oxbow High School Recreatin00 the Spirit of the Little Red School House Some of us look back with considerable fondness to the dav of the little red schoolhouse. The nostalgia and romance surrounding it remind us of the "good old days." The truth, however, is that very few of these schoolhouses were red -- and many of them + were not particularly good. Teachers were often poorly trained. In fact, few teachers had achieved an educational level much past the grade level they taught. Teaching materials were practically nonexistent and most of these schools contained only a small number of books and learning sources. Yet, many children mastered reading, writing, arithmetic, and other necessary skills in these schools of the past. The little red schoolhouse was relatively inexpensive to operate, nearby, and reasonably effective in teaching basic skills, It also contained an element that today's schools often lack: Parents who had children in these schools were deeply in- volved. In fact, it was not at all unusual for the entire community to turn out for a school program honoring a special occasion. And, certainly, nearly everyone came to the annual "pie" or "box" supper and the last day of school activities. These events attracted enthusiastic crowds that overflowed the little school. The community attended school activities because they were often "the only game in town." There were few other diversions in those days. People were not forced to make a choice between a school function and some more enticing social activity. Today, parents are every bit as interested in their children as in the days of the little red schoolhouse, perhaps even more so. Unfortunately, however, other activities often appear more attractice than school functions. A common sight today at most sports contests, concerts, plays and other school activities is parents who drive up to the school, unload their children, and drive off, only to return to pick them up when the activity has ended. Ybt, such action on the part of parents can be more dangerous than surface observation may indicate. It may say to their children that they do not consider the school and its activities very interesting or important. And it takes little insight to realize that our children tend to take seriously only those things that we adults consider important. This is especially true when the adults are parents. De we really want to return to the day of the little red schoolhouse? No, not even if we could. We can, however, recreate the spirit of the little red schoolhouse by engaging in our children's school activities to the greatest extent possible. The single major advantage the one-room school had over today's modern schools was parental involvement, interest, and support. There was no other magic in that little school. Just know that parents are both as welcome and as needed in the schools today as they were in the little red schoolhouse of the past. We need your interest. We need your involvement and so do your children. INTERESTING FACT A hippopotamus has a skin an inch and a half thick -- too thick for most bullets to penetrate. DIAMONDS . 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