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Bradford , Vermont
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November 24, 1982     Journal Opinion
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November 24, 1982
 

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NIW NAMP$#IiI! [yme Orford Pier mont Hoverhdf WoOdvJ)te 6o,h VI|MONT Theford olrlee Wet orlee Orodtord Corinth 1 op,hom Newbur v Wefl R,ve Ryegoe Groton :4 25' USI ) 59340 Number 47 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont November24,1982 verhiH checks open bottle law Liahts, carols and music Haverhill bottle about peoplehangingaround District, told selectmen and car inthestreetandhavinga herald Christmas in Bradford Chief Stephen C. The law, enacted by several and drinking in some Wood- the chief he favored the idea cold beer at the same time." investigating the New Hampshire towns, is sville areas, for ms area. tie stud it could They spoke of the high in- BRADFORD-- The Bradford before Dec. 19, On Sunday, the local shut-ins and the local townsofthe aimed at reducing the in- law, whereby his cidence of people drinking in COuld issue a court public. Savage told selectmen he has had a number of beverage complaints from residents %... DAY--Tom Turkey seems to be telling y has finally come. This 30 will grace a Haverhill Corner table. Selectmen asked Savage to review the success of the open container law in other towns, such as Hampton, Laconia and Durham. He said the ordinance could be applied to the entire town, rather than just the precinct of Wood- sville, where most of the complaints came from. Savage suggested there be a public meeting to discuss the proposal, to get the feelings of the voters, who would be asked to approve it at a town meeting. He noted the Hampton law has been upheld in court. "Our problem here is in the street" he said, "when certain people sit along areas in Woodsville center drinking and generally bothering shoppers." He said that type of behavior in public leads to littering, as well. William Morrow, a resident in the Mountain Lakes be a problem, as well, if there was a duly sanctioned event where adults were gathered, with open containers of beer. "What would happen then?" he inquired. Savage said the law could be drafted to limit the scope, maybe, he said, for streets and driveways, not private property. "But the concept of a public way has been enlarged" and the law could have private gatherings as an exception. Selectman Gary Wood offered that a private gathering outside, say at the Mountain Lakes beach area, could be granted a permit so the terms of the open con- tainer law would not apply to that specific social function. Savage said the intent of the law is not to write a court summons worth $110. to the "guy in Woedsville who has no driveway and is washing his Warren selectmen lookin00 for dump burning support WARREN-- The Selectmen of savings for Warren taxpayers, Warren have joined several other small towns to change state regulations to keep the Warren dump open. On Oct. 4, a petition was filed with the Air Resources Commission to amend Regs. 1 and 2 so as to allow open burning waste disposal facilities in towns under 1,00o population. There was a hearing on this joint petition in Room 112 of the He & Welfare Building, Hazen Drive, Coach. Warren selectmen urged local citizens to attend the Concord hearing to support the rule change. If the Regulations are amended to allow open burning waste disposal, the estimated according to the selectmen, over 10 years would be nearly $170,000. Simulated computed testing at the New Hampshire Air Resources Agency in 1977 has demonstrated that open burning dumps in towns with a population of less than 1,00O does not violate federal air quaZity standards, The Warren selectmen and other participating towns have fceid a legal Opinion that where there is no violation of air quality standards, the regulation is contrary to law. Participating towns include Warren, Orford, Piermont and Goshen. State Police report Deer, two bears hit by motorists. Vermont State otlt of the Bradford Trooper First Class been busy this Atherton investigated a a variety burglary on Nov. 16. During motor vehicle the previous night, unknown Among them are: persons broke into and en: tered the trailer office struck a vehicle on Thetford Auto Parts in E. in Thetford Thetford. Tires were ag the second removed. been involved Trooper Woodward is in- Woodward in- vestigating a case of unlawful .incident, where mischief which occurred" OPerated by Donald of South Ryegate sometime between the dates of Oct. 31 and Nov. 5. damage to the The incident took place on Cross road in W. Fairlee. The onto the hi owner of a home there, struck the vehicle. Huntington Real Estate of Was killed. :t 0 ,e Bradford suffered 21 broken windows. It has been deter- mined that neighborhood youths may be responsible and that several suspects have been developed. An investigation by Trooper Michael Jennings continues after a break into the E. Ryegate Post Office. Jennings indicated that he found unknown persons had ripped boards off the side of the building and entered the storage area used by the Postmaster's family. Nothing was stolen and the damage was minimal. He is also investigating the larceny of auto parts from an E. Thetford Auto parts firm. A windshield was stolen from a Chevrolet truck. Jennings is following leads and that as of now, no arrests have been made. Jennings reported he was informed that four wind- shields had been kicked out of vehicles parked at Blake Chevrolet in Bradford. He said three of the vehicles belong to Green Mountain Explosives and one by Blake Chevrolet. Jennings said the vandals had jumped onto the vehicle i d, .r,e lur. t. pae 1 ]] featured by crews of the WBZ Eris Eastman, who is obviously pleased with this [ News Magazine are local folks who produced year's event. Don't miss the feature story next week. Game Supper. At right is Co-Chairman cidence of public drinking in the parking lot of the North Haverhill Fair and at an of. ficial event at the Fourth of July celebration in Wood- sville. Selectman A. Frank Steigler, Jr. said the proposal will need "lots of study and consideration", but said they should pursue the law and have a joint and public meeting on the proposal in February, in time to have it considered at the 1983 town meeting. Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a 1982 Christmas Season Light and Yuletide decoration contest for two main categories-- Residential and Business-Commercial. There will be cash prizes for each category in three places: First--$25.0o, Second-- $15.00 and Third--S10.00. Displays will be based on originality, creativity, overall effect and holiday spirit. Judging will be done by a panel of three, one week nineteenth, winners will be announced at the Community Carol Sing-a-long also spon- sored by the Chamber to be held in the library. Entry forms will be in the JO and at business stores in town. The Chamber is also coordinating a First Annual Carol sing-along to be started at 2:0o p.m. on the afternoon of the 19th of December. We will meet in front of the Academy Building and take a "Yule-Bus" plus extra cars to nursing homes and senior housing centers. At about 3: 30- 4:00 p.m. we will rejoin at the library for a merry time of carolling to both piano and old-time pump organ music. After the festivities, hot chocolate, hot cider, and sweets will end a memorable experience. Won't all of you with voices and some extra spirit you wish to share come join them for this first com- munity-wide event? While out, take note of the :I ! MISS AND MASTER PILGRIMIThese two youngsters came to their Thanksgiving Day feast in style at the Newb'y Elementary School recently. At left is Jennifer Emerson and on the right is Jeremy Huntoon. Newbury children flock to gala Thanksgiving Dinner NEWBURY-- "Gangway ! Here they come. "the folks in the lunch kitchen shouted as the doors on both sides of the room burst open and 90 children hurried in for their Annual Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday, Nov. 18 at the Newbury Elementary School. The special holiday meal, prepared by Dorothy Thor: burn and her crew was a home-cooked delight to the near 100 children who sat down to the special roast turkey feast. Heading the bill of fare that noon was some mighty fine roast turkey, thick gravy, spicy stuffing, mashed potatoes, peas, Boston Brown Bread, homemade sliced white bread, cranberry sauce and stuffed celery. This repast was finished off with a frozen sundae con- sisting of a healthy dose of ice cream swimming in a thick, brown chocolate sauce. That, too was prepared by the gals there at the Newbury Elementary and served out to eager hands. Commenting on the meal, Dorothy Thorburn, a 12 year veteran in the kitchen there, told the Journal Opinion all the items prepared for the school children and staff were fresh made and mostly The Board of of Bradford the Graded t have adopted a policy. It was 10. The ed that the.. 00roup adopts tax policy a dayinadvanceso The Board of Trustees the tax base to insure that to be placed on a warning will the school district as validated recognizes the benefit of tax everyone pays their proper present a petition to the by the school district clerk. stabilization as an incentive to share of the tax burden. To Bradford Academy and The petition will also include a attract new business and this end, the board will defer Graded School District Board specific plan as to the type of industry into Bradford. It also all requests for tax of Trustees containing the tax relief sought. The Board recognizes the necessity of a stabilization to the electorate, original signatures of 5 per- will take no position on any fair and equitable balance in Any business entity desiring cent of the registered voters of request but will place it on the first-time display at the Academy building Special thanks go to the Chamber for lighting and tree, Lucille Stockman for decorations, The Methodist Women of the Church for the wreaths, the Valley Cooperative Nursery School Children, and the Bradford Merchants' Com- munity Lighting Fund. A lighting of the Town will take place on Friday. Nov. 26, at 5 p.m. Try on some Community Pride and have fun while you're at it! ! Board to look at life safety code WOODSVILLE-- Haverhill selectmen this week will request Woodsville Fire Chief Bruce Robbins come to their meeting to tell them more of the life safety code he may propose be adopted. Town Administrator Patricia Klark said the fire safety code is a highly technical item and selectmen are not sure they understand just what he wants them to do. Klark said the board needs to find out more about the plan before they take any en- dorsement action on it. She added that the fire safety code would have to be accepted at town meeting. Selectmen indicated this week that 3anine Sorl o( Haverhill Corner could hook into a street drain passing by her property on Court Street. Last week, Sorg asked the board if she could connect into the drain and they were un- sure of who had jurisdiction over the system. This week they could not claim responsibility for the system, neither could the precinct and therefore, they had no objection. Selectman A. Frank Steigler, Jr. will visit the Skiway road area of Mountain Lakes to determine just what must be done to establish a road into the area. everything would fall together smoothly for the charging children. The potatoes, she revealed, were hand done and whipped up with lots of melted butter, salt and a big shot of pepper. The fresh loaves of bread were concocted, then frozen and baked the previous day. The traditional birds, three of the good looking 20 poun- ders, were government commodity turkeys, all Grade A and shipped frozen to a warehouse in Williston, and then to Oxbow High School where she picks them up. The cook and her crew thawed the birds, then pepped them in the huge gas oven to roast for about seven hours at 350 degrees. The stuffing remained a mystery, as she was very secretive about those ingredients. But an inspecting glance and a hidden sniff of the Thorburn Stuffing used for that meal, revealed a good texture and a mild aroma of fresh spices plate be drenched with the stuff. So, when Grades One through Six and their teachers hit the serving board, the crew of four was at the ready. Quickly, trays were loaded with heaping bowls of stuffing, bowls of gravy and milk containers. The younger children in the first and second Grades sat at set up places, where silverware and napkins were laid out for them. Then they dug in. There was little chatter in the room during the meal, as they continued to devour each item on the green plates. They seemed to like everything. This type of excellent food is frequently available to the children. Dorothy Thorburn says that the tougher the meal is to put together, the less the kids like it. "They love the easiest meal there is" she exclaimed, "pizza. Plain old, cheese pizza. They love it." She said tacos, too are very popular, they love the turkey dinners, Hamburgers, hot dogs and they all seem to relish the easy similar foods are high on the foods, grinders and the like. student's like list. Although please turn to page 5 } I SMALL DINNER--Tiny hands reach up and grasp traditional turkey feast at the Newbury Elementary School during Thanksgiving meal held at the school. andgood.breads. It looked very Two Woodsville men severely The gravy was carefully hurt in fall off bridge wall made from cooked turkey drippings, blended with flour and cooked for an unspecified amount of time, The g0 hungry WELLS RIVER Two Hospital and transferred a The mishap occurred at children made short work of Woodsville men who toppled  short time later to Hanover. 11 : 56 Saturday when a the gravy, requesting their off a bridge abutment passerby reported that Jacobs Saturday, Nov. 20 remain in Huminski suffered head fell nearly 40 feet off an serious condition at the Mary injuries and his condition was abutment on the Wells River Hitchcock Memorial Hospital initially listed as critical. He side of the Connecticut River. warning of a Bradford in Hanover. improved Saturday night and Huminski, in an effort to reach Academy and Graded School Robert Huminski, 21 and is presently considered to be his companion, fell 10 feet, District meeting. The decision Eric Jacobs, 22 fell from an in guarded stable condition, striking his head. of the voters is binding and abutment of the Woodsville- Jacobs suffered internal final. Wells River Bridge just prior injuries as a result of his fall Huminski is the son of to noon. They were taken by and remains in intensive care Journal Opinion Publisher ambulance to the Cottage at the Hanover Hospital. Robert F. Huminski. NIW NAMP$#IiI! [yme Orford Pier mont Hoverhdf WoOdvJ)te 6o,h VI|MONT Theford olrlee Wet orlee Orodtord Corinth 1 op,hom Newbur v Wefl R,ve Ryegoe Groton :4 25' USI ) 59340 Number 47 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont November24,1982 verhiH checks open bottle law Liahts, carols and music Haverhill bottle about peoplehangingaround District, told selectmen and car inthestreetandhavinga herald Christmas in Bradford Chief Stephen C. The law, enacted by several and drinking in some Wood- the chief he favored the idea cold beer at the same time." investigating the New Hampshire towns, is sville areas, for ms area. tie stud it could They spoke of the high in- BRADFORD-- The Bradford before Dec. 19, On Sunday, the local shut-ins and the local townsofthe aimed at reducing the in- law, whereby his cidence of people drinking in COuld issue a court public. Savage told selectmen he has had a number of beverage complaints from residents %... DAY--Tom Turkey seems to be telling y has finally come. This 30 will grace a Haverhill Corner table. Selectmen asked Savage to review the success of the open container law in other towns, such as Hampton, Laconia and Durham. He said the ordinance could be applied to the entire town, rather than just the precinct of Wood- sville, where most of the complaints came from. Savage suggested there be a public meeting to discuss the proposal, to get the feelings of the voters, who would be asked to approve it at a town meeting. He noted the Hampton law has been upheld in court. "Our problem here is in the street" he said, "when certain people sit along areas in Woodsville center drinking and generally bothering shoppers." He said that type of behavior in public leads to littering, as well. William Morrow, a resident in the Mountain Lakes be a problem, as well, if there was a duly sanctioned event where adults were gathered, with open containers of beer. "What would happen then?" he inquired. Savage said the law could be drafted to limit the scope, maybe, he said, for streets and driveways, not private property. "But the concept of a public way has been enlarged" and the law could have private gatherings as an exception. Selectman Gary Wood offered that a private gathering outside, say at the Mountain Lakes beach area, could be granted a permit so the terms of the open con- tainer law would not apply to that specific social function. Savage said the intent of the law is not to write a court summons worth $110. to the "guy in Woedsville who has no driveway and is washing his Warren selectmen lookin00 for dump burning support WARREN-- The Selectmen of savings for Warren taxpayers, Warren have joined several other small towns to change state regulations to keep the Warren dump open. On Oct. 4, a petition was filed with the Air Resources Commission to amend Regs. 1 and 2 so as to allow open burning waste disposal facilities in towns under 1,00o population. There was a hearing on this joint petition in Room 112 of the He & Welfare Building, Hazen Drive, Coach. Warren selectmen urged local citizens to attend the Concord hearing to support the rule change. If the Regulations are amended to allow open burning waste disposal, the estimated according to the selectmen, over 10 years would be nearly $170,000. Simulated computed testing at the New Hampshire Air Resources Agency in 1977 has demonstrated that open burning dumps in towns with a population of less than 1,00O does not violate federal air quaZity standards, The Warren selectmen and other participating towns have fceid a legal Opinion that where there is no violation of air quality standards, the regulation is contrary to law. Participating towns include Warren, Orford, Piermont and Goshen. State Police report Deer, two bears hit by motorists. Vermont State otlt of the Bradford Trooper First Class been busy this Atherton investigated a a variety burglary on Nov. 16. During motor vehicle the previous night, unknown Among them are: persons broke into and en: tered the trailer office struck a vehicle on Thetford Auto Parts in E. in Thetford Thetford. Tires were ag the second removed. been involved Trooper Woodward is in- Woodward in- vestigating a case of unlawful .incident, where mischief which occurred" OPerated by Donald of South Ryegate sometime between the dates of Oct. 31 and Nov. 5. damage to the The incident took place on Cross road in W. Fairlee. The onto the hi owner of a home there, struck the vehicle. Huntington Real Estate of Was killed. :t 0 ,e Bradford suffered 21 broken windows. It has been deter- mined that neighborhood youths may be responsible and that several suspects have been developed. An investigation by Trooper Michael Jennings continues after a break into the E. Ryegate Post Office. Jennings indicated that he found unknown persons had ripped boards off the side of the building and entered the storage area used by the Postmaster's family. Nothing was stolen and the damage was minimal. He is also investigating the larceny of auto parts from an E. Thetford Auto parts firm. A windshield was stolen from a Chevrolet truck. Jennings is following leads and that as of now, no arrests have been made. Jennings reported he was informed that four wind- shields had been kicked out of vehicles parked at Blake Chevrolet in Bradford. He said three of the vehicles belong to Green Mountain Explosives and one by Blake Chevrolet. Jennings said the vandals had jumped onto the vehicle i d, .r,e lur. t. pae 1 ]] featured by crews of the WBZ Eris Eastman, who is obviously pleased with this [ News Magazine are local folks who produced year's event. Don't miss the feature story next week. Game Supper. At right is Co-Chairman cidence of public drinking in the parking lot of the North Haverhill Fair and at an of. ficial event at the Fourth of July celebration in Wood- sville. Selectman A. Frank Steigler, Jr. said the proposal will need "lots of study and consideration", but said they should pursue the law and have a joint and public meeting on the proposal in February, in time to have it considered at the 1983 town meeting. Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a 1982 Christmas Season Light and Yuletide decoration contest for two main categories-- Residential and Business-Commercial. There will be cash prizes for each category in three places: First--$25.0o, Second-- $15.00 and Third--S10.00. Displays will be based on originality, creativity, overall effect and holiday spirit. Judging will be done by a panel of three, one week nineteenth, winners will be announced at the Community Carol Sing-a-long also spon- sored by the Chamber to be held in the library. Entry forms will be in the JO and at business stores in town. The Chamber is also coordinating a First Annual Carol sing-along to be started at 2:0o p.m. on the afternoon of the 19th of December. We will meet in front of the Academy Building and take a "Yule-Bus" plus extra cars to nursing homes and senior housing centers. At about 3: 30- 4:00 p.m. we will rejoin at the library for a merry time of carolling to both piano and old-time pump organ music. After the festivities, hot chocolate, hot cider, and sweets will end a memorable experience. Won't all of you with voices and some extra spirit you wish to share come join them for this first com- munity-wide event? While out, take note of the :I ! MISS AND MASTER PILGRIMIThese two youngsters came to their Thanksgiving Day feast in style at the Newb'y Elementary School recently. At left is Jennifer Emerson and on the right is Jeremy Huntoon. Newbury children flock to gala Thanksgiving Dinner NEWBURY-- "Gangway ! Here they come. "the folks in the lunch kitchen shouted as the doors on both sides of the room burst open and 90 children hurried in for their Annual Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday, Nov. 18 at the Newbury Elementary School. The special holiday meal, prepared by Dorothy Thor: burn and her crew was a home-cooked delight to the near 100 children who sat down to the special roast turkey feast. Heading the bill of fare that noon was some mighty fine roast turkey, thick gravy, spicy stuffing, mashed potatoes, peas, Boston Brown Bread, homemade sliced white bread, cranberry sauce and stuffed celery. This repast was finished off with a frozen sundae con- sisting of a healthy dose of ice cream swimming in a thick, brown chocolate sauce. That, too was prepared by the gals there at the Newbury Elementary and served out to eager hands. Commenting on the meal, Dorothy Thorburn, a 12 year veteran in the kitchen there, told the Journal Opinion all the items prepared for the school children and staff were fresh made and mostly The Board of of Bradford the Graded t have adopted a policy. It was 10. The ed that the.. 00roup adopts tax policy a dayinadvanceso The Board of Trustees the tax base to insure that to be placed on a warning will the school district as validated recognizes the benefit of tax everyone pays their proper present a petition to the by the school district clerk. stabilization as an incentive to share of the tax burden. To Bradford Academy and The petition will also include a attract new business and this end, the board will defer Graded School District Board specific plan as to the type of industry into Bradford. It also all requests for tax of Trustees containing the tax relief sought. The Board recognizes the necessity of a stabilization to the electorate, original signatures of 5 per- will take no position on any fair and equitable balance in Any business entity desiring cent of the registered voters of request but will place it on the first-time display at the Academy building Special thanks go to the Chamber for lighting and tree, Lucille Stockman for decorations, The Methodist Women of the Church for the wreaths, the Valley Cooperative Nursery School Children, and the Bradford Merchants' Com- munity Lighting Fund. A lighting of the Town will take place on Friday. Nov. 26, at 5 p.m. Try on some Community Pride and have fun while you're at it! ! Board to look at life safety code WOODSVILLE-- Haverhill selectmen this week will request Woodsville Fire Chief Bruce Robbins come to their meeting to tell them more of the life safety code he may propose be adopted. Town Administrator Patricia Klark said the fire safety code is a highly technical item and selectmen are not sure they understand just what he wants them to do. Klark said the board needs to find out more about the plan before they take any en- dorsement action on it. She added that the fire safety code would have to be accepted at town meeting. Selectmen indicated this week that 3anine Sorl o( Haverhill Corner could hook into a street drain passing by her property on Court Street. Last week, Sorg asked the board if she could connect into the drain and they were un- sure of who had jurisdiction over the system. This week they could not claim responsibility for the system, neither could the precinct and therefore, they had no objection. Selectman A. Frank Steigler, Jr. will visit the Skiway road area of Mountain Lakes to determine just what must be done to establish a road into the area. everything would fall together smoothly for the charging children. The potatoes, she revealed, were hand done and whipped up with lots of melted butter, salt and a big shot of pepper. The fresh loaves of bread were concocted, then frozen and baked the previous day. The traditional birds, three of the good looking 20 poun- ders, were government commodity turkeys, all Grade A and shipped frozen to a warehouse in Williston, and then to Oxbow High School where she picks them up. The cook and her crew thawed the birds, then pepped them in the huge gas oven to roast for about seven hours at 350 degrees. The stuffing remained a mystery, as she was very secretive about those ingredients. But an inspecting glance and a hidden sniff of the Thorburn Stuffing used for that meal, revealed a good texture and a mild aroma of fresh spices plate be drenched with the stuff. So, when Grades One through Six and their teachers hit the serving board, the crew of four was at the ready. Quickly, trays were loaded with heaping bowls of stuffing, bowls of gravy and milk containers. The younger children in the first and second Grades sat at set up places, where silverware and napkins were laid out for them. Then they dug in. There was little chatter in the room during the meal, as they continued to devour each item on the green plates. They seemed to like everything. This type of excellent food is frequently available to the children. Dorothy Thorburn says that the tougher the meal is to put together, the less the kids like it. "They love the easiest meal there is" she exclaimed, "pizza. Plain old, cheese pizza. They love it." She said tacos, too are very popular, they love the turkey dinners, Hamburgers, hot dogs and they all seem to relish the easy similar foods are high on the foods, grinders and the like. student's like list. Although please turn to page 5 } I SMALL DINNER--Tiny hands reach up and grasp traditional turkey feast at the Newbury Elementary School during Thanksgiving meal held at the school. andgood.breads. It looked very Two Woodsville men severely The gravy was carefully hurt in fall off bridge wall made from cooked turkey drippings, blended with flour and cooked for an unspecified amount of time, The g0 hungry WELLS RIVER Two Hospital and transferred a The mishap occurred at children made short work of Woodsville men who toppled  short time later to Hanover. 11 : 56 Saturday when a the gravy, requesting their off a bridge abutment passerby reported that Jacobs Saturday, Nov. 20 remain in Huminski suffered head fell nearly 40 feet off an serious condition at the Mary injuries and his condition was abutment on the Wells River Hitchcock Memorial Hospital initially listed as critical. He side of the Connecticut River. warning of a Bradford in Hanover. improved Saturday night and Huminski, in an effort to reach Academy and Graded School Robert Huminski, 21 and is presently considered to be his companion, fell 10 feet, District meeting. The decision Eric Jacobs, 22 fell from an in guarded stable condition, striking his head. of the voters is binding and abutment of the Woodsville- Jacobs suffered internal final. Wells River Bridge just prior injuries as a result of his fall Huminski is the son of to noon. They were taken by and remains in intensive care Journal Opinion Publisher ambulance to the Cottage at the Hanover Hospital. Robert F. Huminski.