"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
November 24, 1982     Journal Opinion
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 24, 1982
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page 4-The Journal Opinion-November 24, 122 NORTHEAST PUBLISHIN(; ('OMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I[ Opinion Wotkly oaWSlNpor pvbltsked in lredled, VarmNt. Sqlbscriptleu ras - Vermont end Nev Hampshire  $9,00 par year; $6.00 far six mono; eat of stab - $1|.Oe par yonr end SY.0O for six mouths; So.Jar cifize discount St.00. Second lass poltl|p; plld at Ilmdferd, Vermont 05033. Published by Northeas! Publishing ompuny, In(., P.0. Be! 371, Bmdfonl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Some thanks-1982 During a recent tour of many area elementary schools in both Vermont and New Hampshire, we were pleased to find that most youngsters were very much looking forward to visits to their "Grammie's" or to "some special relatives" on Thanksgiving Day. This is what the children were thankful for, while others thought the most significant part of Thanksgiving was eating turkey or helping Morn in the kitchen. But most of them, too looked forward to a visit with Grammie, They weren't thankful for television, slick Atari games or things of that sort. They were thankful for a visit to a grandparent or other relative. They were actually looking forward to seeing these special people. And while there, they in- dicated, they will have fun and say thanks to those special people in person. So, let's take an example from our area six year olds and offer a thank you to some, of the special people in our lives, too. Let's see, it could he a close relative, a neighbor down the street who when things .: or Dad who cm were tough. Or how about a boss or pal, who offered a slight pat on the shoulder, reminding you that your not alone when trouble hits. What about your neighbor who offered assistance when you figured people really weren't interested in your personal problem? Or the person at work who looked into helping out someone who is down on hard times. It is always nice to say "thanks" and at no other time of the year would it he more appropriate than at Thanksgiving. We have a few thanks to offer on this holiday. We at the Journal Opinion offer a nice "thanks" to our readers who have always been at our side offering suggestions, assistance and criticism. We appre.c, iate the support and especially the new surge of readership reflected i climbing circulation figures. We thank you for that! We thank our advertisers for telling their messages to thepublic through the medium of the Journal Opinion. We are thankful for this and look forward to many years of this special relationship. And thanks to the area school kids who said so many good and things and us to ) what we were doing and say... "Thank you." Vermont State Police news Teacher tank nearly sugared (continued from page 1 ) hoods and kicked the wind- shields in. Total damage in this spree amounted to $875. fie said it probably is related to a similar incipient in the area. Jennings received a report from a bus driver that a school bus was passed while in front of the Oxbow High School. The bus driver took down the registration, passing it over to the trooper. Jennings interviewed the suspect and issued a $75. citation. Jennings says this week he has a suspect in an unlawful mischief incident in E. Ryegate Village. He said that a Blue Mountain school teacher discovered someone attempted to place sugar in his gas tank. The discovery was made by an attendant at the Wells River Gulf Station. Jennings said the victim was lucky and no sugar en- tered, the tank. Damage amount to $35. to clean the tank. And Jennings is in- vestigating a break in Corinth. The complaintant Marjorie Bobin said her home was entered on Pike Hill and three items removed through the forced front door. Stolen was a metal kitchen cabinet worth $20. along with a box stove worth $125. and a bicycle worth $100. The investigation is continuing. Jennings recently received a complaint from a mechanic at H.O. Taylor's that he was driving a Cabot Creamery Truck in for repairs, when an unidentified female exited Route 91 southbound at the Wells River roadway. She ran the stop sign at a high rate of speed and the mechanic had to take an evasive maneuver to avoid being struck He placed the truck on the raised highway divider, avoiding contact. Jennings is looking for the vehicle, a brown Chevrolet Malibu. Trooper First Class Howard Atherton investigated a one- vehicle accident. A vehicle operated by Jeffrey Boyce at 2:05 recently, left the right side of the road, hit several guard rails and a route sign, suffering moderate damage to the right side of his 1977 four door Chevrolet. The accident happened on Route 5 in Fairlee." Trooper Michael Woodward is investigating an incident of unlawful mischief. Recently at 1 p.m. in the afternoon, Edward Pavlik of Con- necticut, told police damage had been done to his woodlot where trees were cut to gain access to his land. A suspect has been sought and the case continues under investigation. Woodward also investigated a one vehicle accident recently at 4 p.m. on Inter- state 91 in Thetford. The operator, August Bobon of Connecticut suffered front end damage to his vehicle worth $1 O00. when it struck a deer which had run onto the road from a median strip. Woodward also has been investigating a larceny of blankets from the Hollywood Motel in Fairlee. Owner Benoit J. Nadeau claimed that customers staying at his motel may have taken the four blankets. The suspects are from out of state. Trooper Woodward in- vestigated a two car accident at the Laundromat in Brad- ford last week. Phillip W. Sharp of Bradford suffered rear end damage to his Datsun amounting to $500. He was struck in the rear by James D. Nichols of Route 25 in Brad- ford, who suffered $100. in damage. At 2:30 on Nov. 13, a vehicle operated by Gene Levy of East Ryegate suffered front end damage when a deer jumped a guardrail and struck the car. Her vehicle suffered $1,000. damage to the front end. Woodward is' also in- vestigating a case of unlawful mischief when, on Nov. 13 at the East Thefford Laun- dromat, a vehicle owned by Thongdan Sitheddy from Lyrne suffered damage. His 1982 Datsun was scratched on the hood and along both doors to the amount of $150. It ap- peared that the instrument used to inflict the damage was a knife. The suspect is being sought. Trooper Jaime Constantine investigated a two car ac- cident in Bradford which sent one injured person to Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. The accident occurred at 5:30 p.m. on Nov. 15. Mary Blouin of Bradford suffered moderate front end damage to her vehicle when she hit a vehicle occupied by Ronald French who was preparing to make a left hand turn when Blouin failed to stop. t A rea childre n are ready .for Turkey Day VERMONT--NEW HAMP- SHIRE- Area schools are decorated with turkeys, Pilgrims, sailing Mayflower ships and pumpkin pie. Art classes are in high gear, creating all sorts of clever items, all depicting the Thanksgiving theme. For children in the region, Thanksgiving means many different things. For some it is a trip to see a parent, a grandparent or to sit in a local restaurant and partake of a hearty holiday meal. A visit recently with many of these youngsters in local grade schools revealed one thing. By far the most popular guy or gal on the block around Thanksgiving is the turkey. Nearly every child revealed that the turkey was Thanksgiving. Here is what they had to say: At the James R. Morrill School in N. Haverhill a poster there indicated the classes were offering Thanksgiving to water, sun, grandparents, nimals, school, weather, tt'ees, Miss Carom Gidget Rollins said it was a special day because she eats turkey and takes a trip to see her grandfather and grand- mother. Nathan Brown said he eats turkey, then goes outside. "Then my sister and I play inside". At the Woodsville Elementary School, First Graders are under the wat- chful eye of Margaret Kleinfelder. Little Rabble Fagnant says he has lots of turkey. Lisa Corey of Woodsville reveals that she and her folks will he travelling "down to my aunt's" and she is most eager to have "'some carrots and potatoes." Jennifer Whalen is a bud- ding historian. She launched into an accurate record of the Pilgrim's trip across the Atlantic "to somewhere here", where they sat right down with the Indians near the Mayflower. She indicated it was almost her favorite holiday because "I get to see my parents and lots of nice relatives," ........ Odessa Dempsey, who "lives in the blue house in Woodsville" says she likes Thanksgiving because you "celebrate a bi party " Jill Page, 7 Thanlsgiving becau special for she will her dinner in a where she will turkey and dessert". Children at the Elementary School with a Thanks project. Michael said the best Thanksgiving was "Grammies". Tara said her mother of stuff in the cluding turkey and fing." Tara helps in chen with the but Michael said rather not be in the Both are First school. Mary Jane Second Grade Thanksgiving was next week, because "will go to see Walpole". She looks to the meal of pumpkin pie. ".4 Thanl00vin00 At the Union 36 School in Topsham, there knew just around the Nathan Acker of Thanksgiving was a holiday "because had their first feast Indians. It was a big He said he has a big "sometimes" and he sure what he liked Turkey, stuffing berry sauce, however, for "some dinners." Kristin Wheeler River said part of Thanksgiving she can sleep late morning. "Potatoe And Misty Sweet Corinth said she likes and the ride to Topsham. At the School the "y with enthusiastic looking forward Thanksgiving, all mings and visits please turn to page 5 Some are white, others black. Some / frozen, some fresh, some female, others male. And some are wild, while most are domestic. What creature could be so versatile and so popular in this region at this time of the year? The turkey. This large game bird is really related to the pheasant and ranges as far north as Maine. Someday, the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game indicated recently, there will be wild turkeys in this area of New Hamhire. Some havebeen seen in Monroe. And in Vermont, the most successful wild turkey management program in the country has seen a large number of birds taken, each year. Timse wild mrkays gather in small flocks and eat nuts, berries and other small items. At night they rot in trees. Raising turkeys in this region is not really difficult. The day old pours arrive over at Agway in early April and by the second week of November, just 32 weeks later, they are ready for slaught'. We have been raising t-urkys for five years and have always had good luck with them. There are usually one or two of the younger chicks who won't survive those difficult first days, butwe end up with over 90 percent at slaughter time. This year, we started killing them earlier to take advantage of lighter birds. The recent session last wk indicated that hens being made ready for Thanksgiving and Christmas are weighing in at 17 pounds. We are holding back one huge Tom turkey for our family Thanksgiving and his weight is now at 40 pounds! Local prices for a fresh bird are ranging this year around 58 cents up to 80 cents. Fresh killed birds sold at turkey houses are well over $1.00 per pound. Frozen prices this year are equally as attractive. We have so far, my turkey partner and I, lodged 90 pounds each of dressed birds in the freezers. The color of these White Holland birds is excellent, the meat tender and firm and costs to raise them has been reasonable. For just the baby birds at $2.50 each and grain to feed and finish up to this point, each pound of dressed turkey cost us approximately 96 cents. That is not bad for a product this fresh. We find that roasting the bird in the wood fired cook stove is by far the most nnUlar way to produce a very tasty . The bird is cooked breast up in an oven kept around 325 to 350 degrees. It is coated with a light covering of butter, stuffed and cooked for at least 7 hours. We find this time is the best to produce a delicious 25to 30 pound turkey. Two hours, before it is ready to be taken out of the oven, give it one last turn and take the top off the baking pan. The last few cooking lmurs will give the bird an excellent bronzy look. Looking out the window this morning as this is being written, the frost has coated the floor of the turkey pen out to the back of the house. Old Tom .Turkey struts about, clicking and gobblir, g into tbe morning c01d. He seems to he complaining, probably not about the weather, but about the nature of the Thanksgiving holiday. Not much of a Thanksgiving for him. ) (Letters to the Editor Political spirit alive and well! To the Editor: volunteers and contributors, destination was built by Others, were simply out there others. Perhaps no other ef- I Darling Pond, Vail's Pond, and Noyes or Seyon Pond -- all of these are the same body of water in West Gr,ton, the names indicating some of the owners through the years. Around the 170's this area was owned as woodlots by Jonathan Darling and Isaac Ricker, who operated a sawmill in Groton village. In 1884 they dissolved their partnership, Mr. Darling retaining the virgin tim- berland in West Groton and the adjoining uncharted area known as Harris Gore. He began logging it in the early 1890's, erecting a sawmill and a bosrdinghouse, 00ides Se00'on Pond a wilderness retreat large house for his own * family. He also built a dam to enlarge the small natural pond nearby -- which became Darling Pond. In 1898 Mr. Darling sold out to S. F. Griffith, known at that time as the "Lumber King of Vermont." In 1910 the pond and 200 acres around it were pur- chased by Theodore N. Vail, one of America's financial titans, who had built up the American Telephone and Telegraph Company and at that time was its president, He bought Darling Pond because of its reputation as an ex- cellent habitat for native brook trout, and used it as a fishing camp for himself and his many business acquain- tances. When Mr. Vail died, Darling Pond was sold to Robert Peckett, owner of one of New England's most famous summer and winter resorts, in Sugar Hill. In later years, after the Robitzers owned the pond, Mr. Peckett, who was then in his eighties, used to come and visit the place, and would regale ever:gne at lunch with anecdotes of his experiences here, and the famous Americans who had been his guests. concrete dam with an enor- mous spillway, then erected a building to enclose a 20-foot water wheel and generator. He also redecorated and renovated the main house, strengthening it with steel l- beams to support the large living and dining rooms. At the base of a spring that is reputed to be one of the best in Vermont, Mr. Noyes built a fish hatchery building -- but it was never used, because the pond was already producing and supporting as many trout as anyone could want. When Mr. Noyes died in 1924, his will placed the Seyon property in a trust to keep it in the family, and to care for it forever. Although this was a fine thought, it never seemed to work, as the Noyes heirs did not have enough interest in the place. It was largely at the mercy of the bank and the caretakers until 1954, when the estate's trustees obtained a court order breaking the will, and put Seyon up for sale. Sources: Mr. Glover's Groton; recollections of Arland Robitzer. Purchase by Robitzers In the meantime, At!and Robitzer and his wife, Jimmie (Marjorie), of Reading, Pennsylvania, had become December of 1955. Mr. Robitzer's memoirs tell about their first visit to the pond with their realtor: "He led us through several pic- turebook villages and then onto a country dirt road that led us to a lesser dirt road. (We assumed the dirt since everything was snow-covered at that time.) Here we learned that the property had two miles of private road, all uphill, and with three gates to open... The entire entrance road was lined with tall old native hardwoods... "After a long and slow climb, we came into a clearing which resembled a plateau nestled in the mountains, and so it was, as the buildings sat at an altitude of 2000 feet. As we stopped in front of the largest building, the realtor pointed to what seemed to be a large, snow-covered field and said, 'There is the best native trout pond in New England'.. "The house was sturdy and built for the ages. It had 17 assorted rooms, two cellars, and a large, L-shaped, sunny perch. There were a huge barn, several smaller sheds, a boathouse, a caretaker's cottage, and a generating system powered by a 204oot water wheel. There was also the fish hatchery building, agreed on price, and shortly thereafter the bank over- seeing the estate accepted our offer/' For $45,000 the Robitzers got a 65-acre "lake, 11 buildings, furnishings and equipment, and 3436 acres of partially-logged woodland. Moving day After extended goodbyes, Harry Noyes It's the candidate's name in the crowd, shaking my fort requires the help of so In 1929 the pond was sold which is emblazoned on bumper stickers, ad- hand, waving from the car, many. I am most grateful to to Harry K. Noyes of Boston, passing on a good word to a you. vertisements, buttons and neighbor, sharing a warm I believe the political spirit theBuicksmaSterfor all ofdistributrNew England.f handouts. But behind every political figure are the peopte smile, is alive and well in the State of To rename the pond, he who remain anonymous, but I want to say thanks to you Vermont, thanks to the many reversed Noyes to make who have given their support, all. Although in the end, it's individuals who continue to Seyon, and he called the place the candidate who stands at give it life. "Seyon Trout Ranch." Some of them are known,- the podium alone facing the Madeleine M. Kunin Mr. Noyes enlarged the they appear on lists of microphones, the road to that Burlington, Vt. pond by building a huge bored and disilltmioned with city life. He decided to give up his beer wholesaling business, and they made plans to find a new way of life and a new way of earning a living, somewhere out in the country. After a year of searching for the perfect spot, they finally found it at Seyon Pond, in which had never been used. "Love at first sight is a tired and overworked phrase, yet it still expresses best our feelings for what we saw -- although we tried to avvear nonchalant to the realtor. With certain knowledge that this piece of the world was what we had been seeking, we hour gusts, shaking the house former owners, and rocking the beds. of the first telephones Another surprise awaited area, a private line them in the morning -- 22 daring through the inches of snow. As fast as several miles, the possible they emptied the from tree to tree. contents of the tractor-trailer "Our into the sunporch, then controlled by an everybody who was leaving Groton left quickly before the room facing the main snowdrifts became ira- There, in truth, was passable, of information, friendly and warra, Settling in always aware, by Although the house at her front window Seyon was basically sound, it telephone had suffered from years of everything that was haphazard care, and required "We often considerable repairing, advice. Where do cleaning, and painting, doctor? To whom do Through the yearsits defenses our taxes? Who against wintery weather bad syrup? Who is a greatly diminished, so, driven electrician, a by necessity, and with mechanic? She freezing fingers, the Robitzers tell us. hurriedly puttied the windows "Our and replaced stormsash to cut was 39 ring 2, but no down the drafts, how many rings, With all there was to be the line -- and I done, the days were never nine -- would pick long enough, but in this brand telephone and new world of theirs there was conversation. great satisfaction in learning accepted form of and adapting and coping, especially during the What they didn't learn by trial months. Our '39 and error they could usually also a source find out by asking their new, h- our supposedly bors. sophisticated They gradually explored friends, but I tell their new little kingdom by sorely putting on their snowshoes friendliness of the every day a little.before dusk when progress and going out for an hour or and our old so, and as the April sun slowly telephone. "Today's endless of ridiculously long of numbers reauires a finger and one hell memory. It used to be i the Robitzers packed up and headed for Vermont on a sunny, almost summery, day in late March. Their caravan included a stake truck, a tractor-trailer, and their car. In Groton they were joined by the realtor in his new Packard. Everything went fine until they started the two mile consumed the snow, surprises came to light almost daily -- ascent to Seyon. All four such as a large and well-built vehicles got bogged down in dock on the shore-of the the snow and mud and had to pond. he rescued by the combined efforts of a neighboring far- The telephone mer with a tractor, and the Mr. Robitzer speaks of local road agent with an an- their telephone and its fringe cient bulldozer, who hauled all benefits: "For our first four or the vehicles up to the house, five years the old wooden wail It was cold and dark by telephone was still in use. the time they arrived, so Since Theodore N. Vail, the warm Cues and a quieidy telephone magnate of the cooked supper were most early 1900,s, was one of the welcome, and so everyone was bedded down for the night  -- family, friends who were helping them move, truck drivers, and the realtor. Moving day had been springlike, but Mr. Robitzer says that all hell broke loose during the night. They began learning right then and there that the wind was a force to be reckoned with at this high altitude, funneling between the hills and sweeping aoss the lake in 40 to 50 mile an a crank, and say, if P. T. isn't our please get him on the (Note: This was P. T. owner and operator grocery store in village.)  _. (Continued next we" The Living Room Page 4-The Journal Opinion-November 24, 122 NORTHEAST PUBLISHIN(; ('OMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I[ Opinion Wotkly oaWSlNpor pvbltsked in lredled, VarmNt. Sqlbscriptleu ras - Vermont end Nev Hampshire  $9,00 par year; $6.00 far six mono; eat of stab - $1|.Oe par yonr end SY.0O for six mouths; So.Jar cifize discount St.00. Second lass poltl|p; plld at Ilmdferd, Vermont 05033. Published by Northeas! Publishing ompuny, In(., P.0. Be! 371, Bmdfonl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Some thanks-1982 During a recent tour of many area elementary schools in both Vermont and New Hampshire, we were pleased to find that most youngsters were very much looking forward to visits to their "Grammie's" or to "some special relatives" on Thanksgiving Day. This is what the children were thankful for, while others thought the most significant part of Thanksgiving was eating turkey or helping Morn in the kitchen. But most of them, too looked forward to a visit with Grammie, They weren't thankful for television, slick Atari games or things of that sort. They were thankful for a visit to a grandparent or other relative. They were actually looking forward to seeing these special people. And while there, they in- dicated, they will have fun and say thanks to those special people in person. So, let's take an example from our area six year olds and offer a thank you to some, of the special people in our lives, too. Let's see, it could he a close relative, a neighbor down the street who when things .: or Dad who cm were tough. Or how about a boss or pal, who offered a slight pat on the shoulder, reminding you that your not alone when trouble hits. What about your neighbor who offered assistance when you figured people really weren't interested in your personal problem? Or the person at work who looked into helping out someone who is down on hard times. It is always nice to say "thanks" and at no other time of the year would it he more appropriate than at Thanksgiving. We have a few thanks to offer on this holiday. We at the Journal Opinion offer a nice "thanks" to our readers who have always been at our side offering suggestions, assistance and criticism. We appre.c, iate the support and especially the new surge of readership reflected i climbing circulation figures. We thank you for that! We thank our advertisers for telling their messages to thepublic through the medium of the Journal Opinion. We are thankful for this and look forward to many years of this special relationship. And thanks to the area school kids who said so many good and things and us to ) what we were doing and say... "Thank you." Vermont State Police news Teacher tank nearly sugared (continued from page 1 ) hoods and kicked the wind- shields in. Total damage in this spree amounted to $875. fie said it probably is related to a similar incipient in the area. Jennings received a report from a bus driver that a school bus was passed while in front of the Oxbow High School. The bus driver took down the registration, passing it over to the trooper. Jennings interviewed the suspect and issued a $75. citation. Jennings says this week he has a suspect in an unlawful mischief incident in E. Ryegate Village. He said that a Blue Mountain school teacher discovered someone attempted to place sugar in his gas tank. The discovery was made by an attendant at the Wells River Gulf Station. Jennings said the victim was lucky and no sugar en- tered, the tank. Damage amount to $35. to clean the tank. And Jennings is in- vestigating a break in Corinth. The complaintant Marjorie Bobin said her home was entered on Pike Hill and three items removed through the forced front door. Stolen was a metal kitchen cabinet worth $20. along with a box stove worth $125. and a bicycle worth $100. The investigation is continuing. Jennings recently received a complaint from a mechanic at H.O. Taylor's that he was driving a Cabot Creamery Truck in for repairs, when an unidentified female exited Route 91 southbound at the Wells River roadway. She ran the stop sign at a high rate of speed and the mechanic had to take an evasive maneuver to avoid being struck He placed the truck on the raised highway divider, avoiding contact. Jennings is looking for the vehicle, a brown Chevrolet Malibu. Trooper First Class Howard Atherton investigated a one- vehicle accident. A vehicle operated by Jeffrey Boyce at 2:05 recently, left the right side of the road, hit several guard rails and a route sign, suffering moderate damage to the right side of his 1977 four door Chevrolet. The accident happened on Route 5 in Fairlee." Trooper Michael Woodward is investigating an incident of unlawful mischief. Recently at 1 p.m. in the afternoon, Edward Pavlik of Con- necticut, told police damage had been done to his woodlot where trees were cut to gain access to his land. A suspect has been sought and the case continues under investigation. Woodward also investigated a one vehicle accident recently at 4 p.m. on Inter- state 91 in Thetford. The operator, August Bobon of Connecticut suffered front end damage to his vehicle worth $1 O00. when it struck a deer which had run onto the road from a median strip. Woodward also has been investigating a larceny of blankets from the Hollywood Motel in Fairlee. Owner Benoit J. Nadeau claimed that customers staying at his motel may have taken the four blankets. The suspects are from out of state. Trooper Woodward in- vestigated a two car accident at the Laundromat in Brad- ford last week. Phillip W. Sharp of Bradford suffered rear end damage to his Datsun amounting to $500. He was struck in the rear by James D. Nichols of Route 25 in Brad- ford, who suffered $100. in damage. At 2:30 on Nov. 13, a vehicle operated by Gene Levy of East Ryegate suffered front end damage when a deer jumped a guardrail and struck the car. Her vehicle suffered $1,000. damage to the front end. Woodward is' also in- vestigating a case of unlawful mischief when, on Nov. 13 at the East Thefford Laun- dromat, a vehicle owned by Thongdan Sitheddy from Lyrne suffered damage. His 1982 Datsun was scratched on the hood and along both doors to the amount of $150. It ap- peared that the instrument used to inflict the damage was a knife. The suspect is being sought. Trooper Jaime Constantine investigated a two car ac- cident in Bradford which sent one injured person to Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. The accident occurred at 5:30 p.m. on Nov. 15. Mary Blouin of Bradford suffered moderate front end damage to her vehicle when she hit a vehicle occupied by Ronald French who was preparing to make a left hand turn when Blouin failed to stop. t A rea childre n are ready .for Turkey Day VERMONT--NEW HAMP- SHIRE- Area schools are decorated with turkeys, Pilgrims, sailing Mayflower ships and pumpkin pie. Art classes are in high gear, creating all sorts of clever items, all depicting the Thanksgiving theme. For children in the region, Thanksgiving means many different things. For some it is a trip to see a parent, a grandparent or to sit in a local restaurant and partake of a hearty holiday meal. A visit recently with many of these youngsters in local grade schools revealed one thing. By far the most popular guy or gal on the block around Thanksgiving is the turkey. Nearly every child revealed that the turkey was Thanksgiving. Here is what they had to say: At the James R. Morrill School in N. Haverhill a poster there indicated the classes were offering Thanksgiving to water, sun, grandparents, nimals, school, weather, tt'ees, Miss Carom Gidget Rollins said it was a special day because she eats turkey and takes a trip to see her grandfather and grand- mother. Nathan Brown said he eats turkey, then goes outside. "Then my sister and I play inside". At the Woodsville Elementary School, First Graders are under the wat- chful eye of Margaret Kleinfelder. Little Rabble Fagnant says he has lots of turkey. Lisa Corey of Woodsville reveals that she and her folks will he travelling "down to my aunt's" and she is most eager to have "'some carrots and potatoes." Jennifer Whalen is a bud- ding historian. She launched into an accurate record of the Pilgrim's trip across the Atlantic "to somewhere here", where they sat right down with the Indians near the Mayflower. She indicated it was almost her favorite holiday because "I get to see my parents and lots of nice relatives," ........ Odessa Dempsey, who "lives in the blue house in Woodsville" says she likes Thanksgiving because you "celebrate a bi party " Jill Page, 7 Thanlsgiving becau special for she will her dinner in a where she will turkey and dessert". Children at the Elementary School with a Thanks project. Michael said the best Thanksgiving was "Grammies". Tara said her mother of stuff in the cluding turkey and fing." Tara helps in chen with the but Michael said rather not be in the Both are First school. Mary Jane Second Grade Thanksgiving was next week, because "will go to see Walpole". She looks to the meal of pumpkin pie. ".4 Thanl00vin00 At the Union 36 School in Topsham, there knew just around the Nathan Acker of Thanksgiving was a holiday "because had their first feast Indians. It was a big He said he has a big "sometimes" and he sure what he liked Turkey, stuffing berry sauce, however, for "some dinners." Kristin Wheeler River said part of Thanksgiving she can sleep late morning. "Potatoe And Misty Sweet Corinth said she likes and the ride to Topsham. At the School the "y with enthusiastic looking forward Thanksgiving, all mings and visits please turn to page 5 Some are white, others black. Some / frozen, some fresh, some female, others male. And some are wild, while most are domestic. What creature could be so versatile and so popular in this region at this time of the year? The turkey. This large game bird is really related to the pheasant and ranges as far north as Maine. Someday, the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game indicated recently, there will be wild turkeys in this area of New Hamhire. Some havebeen seen in Monroe. And in Vermont, the most successful wild turkey management program in the country has seen a large number of birds taken, each year. Timse wild mrkays gather in small flocks and eat nuts, berries and other small items. At night they rot in trees. Raising turkeys in this region is not really difficult. The day old pours arrive over at Agway in early April and by the second week of November, just 32 weeks later, they are ready for slaught'. We have been raising t-urkys for five years and have always had good luck with them. There are usually one or two of the younger chicks who won't survive those difficult first days, butwe end up with over 90 percent at slaughter time. This year, we started killing them earlier to take advantage of lighter birds. The recent session last wk indicated that hens being made ready for Thanksgiving and Christmas are weighing in at 17 pounds. We are holding back one huge Tom turkey for our family Thanksgiving and his weight is now at 40 pounds! Local prices for a fresh bird are ranging this year around 58 cents up to 80 cents. Fresh killed birds sold at turkey houses are well over $1.00 per pound. Frozen prices this year are equally as attractive. We have so far, my turkey partner and I, lodged 90 pounds each of dressed birds in the freezers. The color of these White Holland birds is excellent, the meat tender and firm and costs to raise them has been reasonable. For just the baby birds at $2.50 each and grain to feed and finish up to this point, each pound of dressed turkey cost us approximately 96 cents. That is not bad for a product this fresh. We find that roasting the bird in the wood fired cook stove is by far the most nnUlar way to produce a very tasty . The bird is cooked breast up in an oven kept around 325 to 350 degrees. It is coated with a light covering of butter, stuffed and cooked for at least 7 hours. We find this time is the best to produce a delicious 25to 30 pound turkey. Two hours, before it is ready to be taken out of the oven, give it one last turn and take the top off the baking pan. The last few cooking lmurs will give the bird an excellent bronzy look. Looking out the window this morning as this is being written, the frost has coated the floor of the turkey pen out to the back of the house. Old Tom .Turkey struts about, clicking and gobblir, g into tbe morning c01d. He seems to he complaining, probably not about the weather, but about the nature of the Thanksgiving holiday. Not much of a Thanksgiving for him. ) (Letters to the Editor Political spirit alive and well! To the Editor: volunteers and contributors, destination was built by Others, were simply out there others. Perhaps no other ef- I Darling Pond, Vail's Pond, and Noyes or Seyon Pond -- all of these are the same body of water in West Gr,ton, the names indicating some of the owners through the years. Around the 170's this area was owned as woodlots by Jonathan Darling and Isaac Ricker, who operated a sawmill in Groton village. In 1884 they dissolved their partnership, Mr. Darling retaining the virgin tim- berland in West Groton and the adjoining uncharted area known as Harris Gore. He began logging it in the early 1890's, erecting a sawmill and a bosrdinghouse, 00ides Se00'on Pond a wilderness retreat large house for his own * family. He also built a dam to enlarge the small natural pond nearby -- which became Darling Pond. In 1898 Mr. Darling sold out to S. F. Griffith, known at that time as the "Lumber King of Vermont." In 1910 the pond and 200 acres around it were pur- chased by Theodore N. Vail, one of America's financial titans, who had built up the American Telephone and Telegraph Company and at that time was its president, He bought Darling Pond because of its reputation as an ex- cellent habitat for native brook trout, and used it as a fishing camp for himself and his many business acquain- tances. When Mr. Vail died, Darling Pond was sold to Robert Peckett, owner of one of New England's most famous summer and winter resorts, in Sugar Hill. In later years, after the Robitzers owned the pond, Mr. Peckett, who was then in his eighties, used to come and visit the place, and would regale ever:gne at lunch with anecdotes of his experiences here, and the famous Americans who had been his guests. concrete dam with an enor- mous spillway, then erected a building to enclose a 20-foot water wheel and generator. He also redecorated and renovated the main house, strengthening it with steel l- beams to support the large living and dining rooms. At the base of a spring that is reputed to be one of the best in Vermont, Mr. Noyes built a fish hatchery building -- but it was never used, because the pond was already producing and supporting as many trout as anyone could want. When Mr. Noyes died in 1924, his will placed the Seyon property in a trust to keep it in the family, and to care for it forever. Although this was a fine thought, it never seemed to work, as the Noyes heirs did not have enough interest in the place. It was largely at the mercy of the bank and the caretakers until 1954, when the estate's trustees obtained a court order breaking the will, and put Seyon up for sale. Sources: Mr. Glover's Groton; recollections of Arland Robitzer. Purchase by Robitzers In the meantime, At!and Robitzer and his wife, Jimmie (Marjorie), of Reading, Pennsylvania, had become December of 1955. Mr. Robitzer's memoirs tell about their first visit to the pond with their realtor: "He led us through several pic- turebook villages and then onto a country dirt road that led us to a lesser dirt road. (We assumed the dirt since everything was snow-covered at that time.) Here we learned that the property had two miles of private road, all uphill, and with three gates to open... The entire entrance road was lined with tall old native hardwoods... "After a long and slow climb, we came into a clearing which resembled a plateau nestled in the mountains, and so it was, as the buildings sat at an altitude of 2000 feet. As we stopped in front of the largest building, the realtor pointed to what seemed to be a large, snow-covered field and said, 'There is the best native trout pond in New England'.. "The house was sturdy and built for the ages. It had 17 assorted rooms, two cellars, and a large, L-shaped, sunny perch. There were a huge barn, several smaller sheds, a boathouse, a caretaker's cottage, and a generating system powered by a 204oot water wheel. There was also the fish hatchery building, agreed on price, and shortly thereafter the bank over- seeing the estate accepted our offer/' For $45,000 the Robitzers got a 65-acre "lake, 11 buildings, furnishings and equipment, and 3436 acres of partially-logged woodland. Moving day After extended goodbyes, Harry Noyes It's the candidate's name in the crowd, shaking my fort requires the help of so In 1929 the pond was sold which is emblazoned on bumper stickers, ad- hand, waving from the car, many. I am most grateful to to Harry K. Noyes of Boston, passing on a good word to a you. vertisements, buttons and neighbor, sharing a warm I believe the political spirit theBuicksmaSterfor all ofdistributrNew England.f handouts. But behind every political figure are the peopte smile, is alive and well in the State of To rename the pond, he who remain anonymous, but I want to say thanks to you Vermont, thanks to the many reversed Noyes to make who have given their support, all. Although in the end, it's individuals who continue to Seyon, and he called the place the candidate who stands at give it life. "Seyon Trout Ranch." Some of them are known,- the podium alone facing the Madeleine M. Kunin Mr. Noyes enlarged the they appear on lists of microphones, the road to that Burlington, Vt. pond by building a huge bored and disilltmioned with city life. He decided to give up his beer wholesaling business, and they made plans to find a new way of life and a new way of earning a living, somewhere out in the country. After a year of searching for the perfect spot, they finally found it at Seyon Pond, in which had never been used. "Love at first sight is a tired and overworked phrase, yet it still expresses best our feelings for what we saw -- although we tried to avvear nonchalant to the realtor. With certain knowledge that this piece of the world was what we had been seeking, we hour gusts, shaking the house former owners, and rocking the beds. of the first telephones Another surprise awaited area, a private line them in the morning -- 22 daring through the inches of snow. As fast as several miles, the possible they emptied the from tree to tree. contents of the tractor-trailer "Our into the sunporch, then controlled by an everybody who was leaving Groton left quickly before the room facing the main snowdrifts became ira- There, in truth, was passable, of information, friendly and warra, Settling in always aware, by Although the house at her front window Seyon was basically sound, it telephone had suffered from years of everything that was haphazard care, and required "We often considerable repairing, advice. Where do cleaning, and painting, doctor? To whom do Through the yearsits defenses our taxes? Who against wintery weather bad syrup? Who is a greatly diminished, so, driven electrician, a by necessity, and with mechanic? She freezing fingers, the Robitzers tell us. hurriedly puttied the windows "Our and replaced stormsash to cut was 39 ring 2, but no down the drafts, how many rings, With all there was to be the line -- and I done, the days were never nine -- would pick long enough, but in this brand telephone and new world of theirs there was conversation. great satisfaction in learning accepted form of and adapting and coping, especially during the What they didn't learn by trial months. Our '39 and error they could usually also a source find out by asking their new, h- our supposedly bors. sophisticated They gradually explored friends, but I tell their new little kingdom by sorely putting on their snowshoes friendliness of the every day a little.before dusk when progress and going out for an hour or and our old so, and as the April sun slowly telephone. "Today's endless of ridiculously long of numbers reauires a finger and one hell memory. It used to be i the Robitzers packed up and headed for Vermont on a sunny, almost summery, day in late March. Their caravan included a stake truck, a tractor-trailer, and their car. In Groton they were joined by the realtor in his new Packard. Everything went fine until they started the two mile consumed the snow, surprises came to light almost daily -- ascent to Seyon. All four such as a large and well-built vehicles got bogged down in dock on the shore-of the the snow and mud and had to pond. he rescued by the combined efforts of a neighboring far- The telephone mer with a tractor, and the Mr. Robitzer speaks of local road agent with an an- their telephone and its fringe cient bulldozer, who hauled all benefits: "For our first four or the vehicles up to the house, five years the old wooden wail It was cold and dark by telephone was still in use. the time they arrived, so Since Theodore N. Vail, the warm Cues and a quieidy telephone magnate of the cooked supper were most early 1900,s, was one of the welcome, and so everyone was bedded down for the night  -- family, friends who were helping them move, truck drivers, and the realtor. Moving day had been springlike, but Mr. Robitzer says that all hell broke loose during the night. They began learning right then and there that the wind was a force to be reckoned with at this high altitude, funneling between the hills and sweeping aoss the lake in 40 to 50 mile an a crank, and say, if P. T. isn't our please get him on the (Note: This was P. T. owner and operator grocery store in village.)  _. (Continued next we" The Living Room