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Bradford , Vermont
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December 1, 1982     Journal Opinion
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December 1, 1982
 

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L l'bree special issues of and SO set for Deceml00r The month of December will see special issues of the Journal Opinion The issue of Wednesday, Dec. 8 will issue with the Second Opinion. for this special issue is expected to 10,400 copies. , second special edition will hit the the following week, Monday, Dec. 13. ! third and final special Christmas issue will USP 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont Decemberl, 1982 [Bradford Lions looking at names Haverhill lookin00 at drainage for their Operation Santa Claus WOODSVILLE-- Haverhill Borden Walker, off Route 10. Road Agent James Boucher Erosion of surrounding proposed that the town lands and improper drainage replace a damaged drainage were cited as the main pipe bordering the land of T. concerns of the existing pipe by Boucher. A figure between Town of g:arren waits for dump talk results by FLOYD R. RAY of the Solid Waste Board, and WARREN-- Thursday, Nov. Peter Benaire of the Nashua 18 several people and the Advisory Board. Doug Clark, selectmen of Warren met with of Warren who lives within 500 the Air Resources or Pollution feet of the Warren dump $1,000. and $13,000. was suggested to selectmen to be budgeted for the needed timber reinforced system, a steel culvert, catch basin, and walls. Included was an estimate of special equipment for the job. Selectmen tabled the item until more exact estimation of materials could be made by Boucher and budget decisions could be voted by the town. Monday, Dec. 20. This will mark of expanded circulation, plus lots and advertisers should make every get their material into our Journal in Bradford without delay, as the ehedule will reflect new deadlines. isingi"-- -- deadline for the first special issue - noon, Dec. 6. For the issue of Dec. 13, ing should be in by Wednesday, ber 8, and for the issue of Dec. 20, this l should be submitted by Wednesday, 00.ral local people micted on a 00etv of charges RIRHILL-- The against them came as a result ty Grand Jury of their arrest by Haverhill ed down a series Police on the night of Oct. 17: nts relative to Smith and Hanaford were elony charg s charged with possession of local and Ste marijuana with the intent to BRADFORD-- The Bradford Lions Club is accepting names for consideration into their Operation Santa Claus, where they will be giving Christmas gifts to 100 of the area's most needy children. The program, founded four years ago on an idea of Larry Coffin, will again give con- sideration in finding the needy children and providing them with a Christmas package with at least five items. Coffin told the Journal Opinion he is expecting at least 300 name submissions. Four years ago, Coffin had developed the very popular project to a point where he thought it might work in the Bradford area including Corinth, Topsham, Piermont, Fairlee and the Newbury Town District. He ap- proached the Lions Club, and they agreed to sponsor the program. From there it was off and tuning. Each child in the past received a personal gift, a knitted item, a toothbrush kit, Christmas candy, fruit and several stocking stuffers. The items will be both purchased and donated and just prior to Christmas, will be distributed by members to individual homes. Coffin said at least one family game will also be in- cluded with the gift packet, one that is stimulating and educational. He noted that a lot of thought goes into the gift purchases and in years past, happily applied to next year's excellent quality items are program. obtained. He said all the Recommendations, Coffin purchases are done locally, noted, come from agencies, He saidadeadlineofDec. 10 groups and individuals. He has been set for receiving said the more the program recommendations. Dec. 18 knows about a needy family, will be the deadline for con- the better it will be for the tributions. Any monies selection. He said all in- received after Dec. 23 will be formation is strictly con- tasg them: George sell, possession Of LD with indicted for the intent to sell and Small fire in ,ssession of a manufacturing marijuana. :a convicted felole Hanaford is from S. Ryegate. !edin Woodsvi Kenneth Milazzo has been g:e//s River Police on Oct. 3. charged with the possession of th resident, a controlled drug in Bath, his ,13ath resident, second offense. Milazzo is WELLS RIVER--Fire units from Wells River and aick has been from Bath. Woodsville responded early asecond offense'of Sheri L. Crown of Barnet [a controlled drug. was indicted on a burglary Monday morning, Nov. 29 to ted Oct. 14. charge, which authorities say douse a small burning shed located beside railroad tracks mith and Robert occurred in Monroe. of 22 Maple St. Thomas A. Reed of Concord at Shaker Hill. Were both indicted was indicted on two felony The Wells River Fire Department was toned out at of drug related charges; that he allegedly the Grand Jury. escaped from cnstody and that 6:36, followed shortly by charges lodged (please turn to page 10) Woodsville.sounded at 6:46.The all clear was Bradford, Way back in 1957, Cliff and Gary and Marcia Tomlinson, Wild Game Helen McLam organized a the supper, although served on by the little church supper to raise a Saturday afternoon for a six of Christ on money to construct a church hour stretch, is actually under has reached the sidewalk From the original of 25 years and attendance of 100 diners, the fidential. Coffin said the program has been a success and has always exceeded its goals. This year they are seeking at least $2,000. for the Operation Santa Claus project and he says that area residents and businesses have in the past been very (please turn to page 10) , i  Board in Concord. Not only did Warren people attend but also delegations from Piermont and Orford attended. Other towns represented there were Goshen, Washington and Freedom. Larry Gardner from Hanover is leading the effort to exclude all towns under 1,000. population from having to, stop all burning at their open dumps in October 1983. This is the final date for dumps if the state has their way. A study has been made by the towns represented that it will cost towns from $20,000. to $30,000. each year if they are = forced to close these dumps. : Furthermore no one has yet proved that these dumps are .... polluting the mr m these towns. In fact they have never tested it in Warren as far as can be determined. Warren operating during the one day := ::: per week, weather permitting. A lot of people are now bur- ning wood; will the powers that be now attempt to stop this as it pollutes the 3it as much as the dump one day per week, The WOOd fires burn' i!i!::, night and day seven days per week. Among those speaking for : the elimination of the law for the towns under 1,000. were Representative Gete Thomson of Orford, Everett Blake of Orford, Floyd R. Ray of "" Warren, Chester Jones of Freedom, Nelson Works of .:: Freedom, Robert Wright of Washington. Attorney Larry Gardner did a masterful job in presenting the case that the law is illegal, and unen- forceable. Two people spoke for the law, one was Thomas Sweeney ! stated that the dump was not offeflsive to his habitat. Moody of the North Country Council spoke for the towns in his territory. Among those attending from Warren were Mr. and Mrs. Floyd R. Ray, Mr. and Mrs. Robert White, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Whitcher, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mosholder, Eva Bowles, Vera Whitcher, Earl Ramsay,- Everett Goodwin, Douglas Clark, and Grover Libby. These towns expect to hear in 30 days the results of the hearing. Ouick stop credited in Bradford nre BRADFORD-- An apartment occupied by Bradford Police Chief Lynn S. Clogston broke out in flames early Saturday morning while he was out on a Skyway lookin00 for town assist MOUNTAIN LAKES -- Haverhill Selectmen last week said they will look into a proposal by residents of the Skyway area of Mountain Lakes asking that their rural system of roads be upgraded ,and then later possibly ac- cepted as a town road prior to next fall. This follows on the "heels of an on-site inspection of the undeveloped road system by Selectman A. Frank Stiegler, Jr. The proposal was made on behalf of the Skyway residents by William Morrow, a Mt. Lakes resident. The section of road involved a half mile stretch on which set seven lots, two of them town owned. domestic complaint. Morrow indicated that the Clogston said he left the Skyway residents are raising room, which is located over money to accept this possible the Corner Boutique on Main ,rbid street in the village at 4:4o Taxes:gerl by a.m. He said heaved at G:55 1 would benefit  t iown, to find the place in flames. A and the improved access passerby, David Taylor saw would benefit Mountain the fire and called the Lakes, Morrow said. Selec- Bradford Fire Department. They responded with Piermont and doused the blaze in what one witness said "was a darn good stop." Clogston arrived back at the scene slightly ahead of fire units. He said not too much was destroyed, but offered that he had a hole burned in his police jacket. He said sheets, blankets, a window, a wall and the ceiling was destroyed. He said it was a smoky fire. tman Stiegler said that he was not encouraged by his previous inspection of the sight, but that Haverhill Road Agent James Boucher would be called in to discuss the situation. Stiegler felt that since "the town was not in the road building business" and that the town's manpower and equipment for the job might be lacking, the issue would be discussed after further research was complefed. hour feeding. The game comes from all quarters, so to speak. The wild Boar and Moufflon Ram hail locally from the Wild Game Preserve in Ely. Venison is close operation with lots of coon roast, game sausage, local people pulling together rabbit roast, bear roast, boar to get the meal done. sausage and smoked boar, Eris Eastman is a vibrant beaver and buffalo, lady. Under the fire of meal Also Moufflon Ram deadline, she is cool. And as meatloaf, bear meat loaf, preparation plans extending a VENISON SIZZLE--Hod Palmer rustles up over 1,000 hunks of bear and venison week earlier, meat for the annual Game Supper held in Bradford. 00Bradford Game Supper sure-fire 25 year hit eli done history, the event has grown into a Here is where the that when Eris Eastman charge of an event like the a marinaded in an nationally known feast, now management comes in, along stands on the line to the right Annual Game Supper. The recipe of good being attended by 1,000 lucky with that special blend of of the bountiful feast at two vegetables are up at Oxbow t, hard working ticket holders, cooperation with the staff of at minutes before three o'clock, High School and the ,s and a dedicated Under the eyes of co- least 100 stalwarts, who begin everything is ready to go. meatloafs, sausages, the Chairmen Eris Eastman with to put the show together so Several people must be in roasts and pies are all cooked f I at various times.., but at the magic time, everything must be on line and ready to be offered hungry diners. Gary and Marcia Tomlinson are in charge of things surrounding the food, with Gary heading up the game procurement group. He also sees that the items are prepared and Marcia in obtained from the Vermont Fish and Game Department and hunting parishioners. The bear, beaver and coon are from area hunters, parishioners and trappers, while the rabbits are obtained from a broker. From S. Dakota comes the buffalo and the remaining antelope, caribou or elk are the big hand crept closer to the hour, where outside the huge crowds began to assemble, Mrs. Eastman went about her rounds, politely and with the grace of a professional. And she m an involved person, not just with the Game Supper, but with other positions as well She as the treasurer at Oxbow. has her rabbit pie, rabbit liver casserole, game dressing, pheasant and wild rice casserole. Now, for you hungry folks who like bear, this was the year. Plates were heaped with all three versions of bear. Bear roast, bear steak and bear meat loaf were offered as a unit . . . They have never charge of the serving table taken by area hunters, Ver- own business, Trustee of the been able to do this. and one other program. She mont Game folks and other Library, Clerk of the church, Marcia Tomlinson began will see to it, through a hunters. To distinguish the and soon =/ her stint with the Game "l Game Supper a national event I I 4 iON-CAMERA--TV crew from Channel 4 Bradford's recent Wild Game Supper. News Magazine from Boston shoot table full of wild game at meticulous program of notes and schedules, that the 2900 pounds of game is cooked and ready. To be more specific, to feed the 1,000 ticket holders and members of the staff shifts, the organizers need four wild boars, 100 rabbits, 3 bears, 12 beavers, 40 coons, 40 pheasants, one small buffalo (or half a large one), eight deer and usually at least 100 pounds of other meats. OK, the big stuff is out of the way.., what about the other things that make the Game Supper so popular? They need 1200 pounds of assorted vegetables. They need over 1100 portions of ginger bread, up to 2500 rolls and 30 quarts of whipping cream. That is quite a menu for a continuous six types of game, up to 17,000 toothpicks of assorted colors are inserted each piece of meat so the diner may determine the bear from the venison or ram. Each plate bearer is issued a small card, indicating what the various colors refer to. On the magic day as 3:00 nears, the pace inside the notable White Church on Main street picks up. This year, things were running smoothly as the Evening Magazine team out of Channel 4 in Boston set up their gear to film the event. Announcer Barry No}an told the Journal Opinion the show will be on television in about six weeks. Preparations a week prior to the supper are intense. The intricate schedule reflects a She said the event is not a local time. Rather. it has grown from the early for- mative days of 1957 into a national event. She mentions regular customers coming from Tennessee, Florida, the West Coast, Arizona. Channel 5 from Boston has covered the event in the past. and in 1971 the dinner was named as one of the top 20 national events by the Discover America group. They have had to limit seating to 1,000 because of the increasing scarcity of game and that "the number is comfortable to serve. Over 1,000 and it is late at night and the workers are tired. So it remains at 1,000. Heading the menu are a variety of meats, including bear steak, venison roasts. Supper for this year on Saturday Nov. 12, when Buffalo boneless roasts were cooked. Monday Nov. 15 was venison day, when the 325 degree ovens cooked the venison in a marinade with celery and onions. Ken Vit- turn, George Durgin, John Knight, Charlie Stimson, Bud Cole sliced away on thi project. Bear day was the following day. Clove garlic marinade, salt pork bits, with celery and onion surrounded the meat. Slicing and picking bones were Bud Cole, Ken Vittum and George Durgin. Smoked boar was featured on Wed. Nov. 17 after Rev. John Knight picked up the critter in Burlington. (please turn to page I0) L l'bree special issues of and SO set for Deceml00r The month of December will see special issues of the Journal Opinion The issue of Wednesday, Dec. 8 will issue with the Second Opinion. for this special issue is expected to 10,400 copies. , second special edition will hit the the following week, Monday, Dec. 13. ! third and final special Christmas issue will USP 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont Decemberl, 1982 [Bradford Lions looking at names Haverhill lookin00 at drainage for their Operation Santa Claus WOODSVILLE-- Haverhill Borden Walker, off Route 10. Road Agent James Boucher Erosion of surrounding proposed that the town lands and improper drainage replace a damaged drainage were cited as the main pipe bordering the land of T. concerns of the existing pipe by Boucher. A figure between Town of g:arren waits for dump talk results by FLOYD R. RAY of the Solid Waste Board, and WARREN-- Thursday, Nov. Peter Benaire of the Nashua 18 several people and the Advisory Board. Doug Clark, selectmen of Warren met with of Warren who lives within 500 the Air Resources or Pollution feet of the Warren dump $1,000. and $13,000. was suggested to selectmen to be budgeted for the needed timber reinforced system, a steel culvert, catch basin, and walls. Included was an estimate of special equipment for the job. Selectmen tabled the item until more exact estimation of materials could be made by Boucher and budget decisions could be voted by the town. Monday, Dec. 20. This will mark of expanded circulation, plus lots and advertisers should make every get their material into our Journal in Bradford without delay, as the ehedule will reflect new deadlines. isingi"-- -- deadline for the first special issue - noon, Dec. 6. For the issue of Dec. 13, ing should be in by Wednesday, ber 8, and for the issue of Dec. 20, this l should be submitted by Wednesday, 00.ral local people micted on a 00etv of charges RIRHILL-- The against them came as a result ty Grand Jury of their arrest by Haverhill ed down a series Police on the night of Oct. 17: nts relative to Smith and Hanaford were elony charg s charged with possession of local and Ste marijuana with the intent to BRADFORD-- The Bradford Lions Club is accepting names for consideration into their Operation Santa Claus, where they will be giving Christmas gifts to 100 of the area's most needy children. The program, founded four years ago on an idea of Larry Coffin, will again give con- sideration in finding the needy children and providing them with a Christmas package with at least five items. Coffin told the Journal Opinion he is expecting at least 300 name submissions. Four years ago, Coffin had developed the very popular project to a point where he thought it might work in the Bradford area including Corinth, Topsham, Piermont, Fairlee and the Newbury Town District. He ap- proached the Lions Club, and they agreed to sponsor the program. From there it was off and tuning. Each child in the past received a personal gift, a knitted item, a toothbrush kit, Christmas candy, fruit and several stocking stuffers. The items will be both purchased and donated and just prior to Christmas, will be distributed by members to individual homes. Coffin said at least one family game will also be in- cluded with the gift packet, one that is stimulating and educational. He noted that a lot of thought goes into the gift purchases and in years past, happily applied to next year's excellent quality items are program. obtained. He said all the Recommendations, Coffin purchases are done locally, noted, come from agencies, He saidadeadlineofDec. 10 groups and individuals. He has been set for receiving said the more the program recommendations. Dec. 18 knows about a needy family, will be the deadline for con- the better it will be for the tributions. Any monies selection. He said all in- received after Dec. 23 will be formation is strictly con- tasg them: George sell, possession Of LD with indicted for the intent to sell and Small fire in ,ssession of a manufacturing marijuana. :a convicted felole Hanaford is from S. Ryegate. !edin Woodsvi Kenneth Milazzo has been g:e//s River Police on Oct. 3. charged with the possession of th resident, a controlled drug in Bath, his ,13ath resident, second offense. Milazzo is WELLS RIVER--Fire units from Wells River and aick has been from Bath. Woodsville responded early asecond offense'of Sheri L. Crown of Barnet [a controlled drug. was indicted on a burglary Monday morning, Nov. 29 to ted Oct. 14. charge, which authorities say douse a small burning shed located beside railroad tracks mith and Robert occurred in Monroe. of 22 Maple St. Thomas A. Reed of Concord at Shaker Hill. Were both indicted was indicted on two felony The Wells River Fire Department was toned out at of drug related charges; that he allegedly the Grand Jury. escaped from cnstody and that 6:36, followed shortly by charges lodged (please turn to page 10) Woodsville.sounded at 6:46.The all clear was Bradford, Way back in 1957, Cliff and Gary and Marcia Tomlinson, Wild Game Helen McLam organized a the supper, although served on by the little church supper to raise a Saturday afternoon for a six of Christ on money to construct a church hour stretch, is actually under has reached the sidewalk From the original of 25 years and attendance of 100 diners, the fidential. Coffin said the program has been a success and has always exceeded its goals. This year they are seeking at least $2,000. for the Operation Santa Claus project and he says that area residents and businesses have in the past been very (please turn to page 10) , i  Board in Concord. Not only did Warren people attend but also delegations from Piermont and Orford attended. Other towns represented there were Goshen, Washington and Freedom. Larry Gardner from Hanover is leading the effort to exclude all towns under 1,000. population from having to, stop all burning at their open dumps in October 1983. This is the final date for dumps if the state has their way. A study has been made by the towns represented that it will cost towns from $20,000. to $30,000. each year if they are = forced to close these dumps. : Furthermore no one has yet proved that these dumps are .... polluting the mr m these towns. In fact they have never tested it in Warren as far as can be determined. Warren operating during the one day := ::: per week, weather permitting. A lot of people are now bur- ning wood; will the powers that be now attempt to stop this as it pollutes the 3it as much as the dump one day per week, The WOOd fires burn' i!i!::, night and day seven days per week. Among those speaking for : the elimination of the law for the towns under 1,000. were Representative Gete Thomson of Orford, Everett Blake of Orford, Floyd R. Ray of "" Warren, Chester Jones of Freedom, Nelson Works of .:: Freedom, Robert Wright of Washington. Attorney Larry Gardner did a masterful job in presenting the case that the law is illegal, and unen- forceable. Two people spoke for the law, one was Thomas Sweeney ! stated that the dump was not offeflsive to his habitat. Moody of the North Country Council spoke for the towns in his territory. Among those attending from Warren were Mr. and Mrs. Floyd R. Ray, Mr. and Mrs. Robert White, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Whitcher, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mosholder, Eva Bowles, Vera Whitcher, Earl Ramsay,- Everett Goodwin, Douglas Clark, and Grover Libby. These towns expect to hear in 30 days the results of the hearing. Ouick stop credited in Bradford nre BRADFORD-- An apartment occupied by Bradford Police Chief Lynn S. Clogston broke out in flames early Saturday morning while he was out on a Skyway lookin00 for town assist MOUNTAIN LAKES -- Haverhill Selectmen last week said they will look into a proposal by residents of the Skyway area of Mountain Lakes asking that their rural system of roads be upgraded ,and then later possibly ac- cepted as a town road prior to next fall. This follows on the "heels of an on-site inspection of the undeveloped road system by Selectman A. Frank Stiegler, Jr. The proposal was made on behalf of the Skyway residents by William Morrow, a Mt. Lakes resident. The section of road involved a half mile stretch on which set seven lots, two of them town owned. domestic complaint. Morrow indicated that the Clogston said he left the Skyway residents are raising room, which is located over money to accept this possible the Corner Boutique on Main ,rbid street in the village at 4:4o Taxes:gerl by a.m. He said heaved at G:55 1 would benefit  t iown, to find the place in flames. A and the improved access passerby, David Taylor saw would benefit Mountain the fire and called the Lakes, Morrow said. Selec- Bradford Fire Department. They responded with Piermont and doused the blaze in what one witness said "was a darn good stop." Clogston arrived back at the scene slightly ahead of fire units. He said not too much was destroyed, but offered that he had a hole burned in his police jacket. He said sheets, blankets, a window, a wall and the ceiling was destroyed. He said it was a smoky fire. tman Stiegler said that he was not encouraged by his previous inspection of the sight, but that Haverhill Road Agent James Boucher would be called in to discuss the situation. Stiegler felt that since "the town was not in the road building business" and that the town's manpower and equipment for the job might be lacking, the issue would be discussed after further research was complefed. hour feeding. The game comes from all quarters, so to speak. The wild Boar and Moufflon Ram hail locally from the Wild Game Preserve in Ely. Venison is close operation with lots of coon roast, game sausage, local people pulling together rabbit roast, bear roast, boar to get the meal done. sausage and smoked boar, Eris Eastman is a vibrant beaver and buffalo, lady. Under the fire of meal Also Moufflon Ram deadline, she is cool. And as meatloaf, bear meat loaf, preparation plans extending a VENISON SIZZLE--Hod Palmer rustles up over 1,000 hunks of bear and venison week earlier, meat for the annual Game Supper held in Bradford. 00Bradford Game Supper sure-fire 25 year hit eli done history, the event has grown into a Here is where the that when Eris Eastman charge of an event like the a marinaded in an nationally known feast, now management comes in, along stands on the line to the right Annual Game Supper. The recipe of good being attended by 1,000 lucky with that special blend of of the bountiful feast at two vegetables are up at Oxbow t, hard working ticket holders, cooperation with the staff of at minutes before three o'clock, High School and the ,s and a dedicated Under the eyes of co- least 100 stalwarts, who begin everything is ready to go. meatloafs, sausages, the Chairmen Eris Eastman with to put the show together so Several people must be in roasts and pies are all cooked f I at various times.., but at the magic time, everything must be on line and ready to be offered hungry diners. Gary and Marcia Tomlinson are in charge of things surrounding the food, with Gary heading up the game procurement group. He also sees that the items are prepared and Marcia in obtained from the Vermont Fish and Game Department and hunting parishioners. The bear, beaver and coon are from area hunters, parishioners and trappers, while the rabbits are obtained from a broker. From S. Dakota comes the buffalo and the remaining antelope, caribou or elk are the big hand crept closer to the hour, where outside the huge crowds began to assemble, Mrs. Eastman went about her rounds, politely and with the grace of a professional. And she m an involved person, not just with the Game Supper, but with other positions as well She as the treasurer at Oxbow. has her rabbit pie, rabbit liver casserole, game dressing, pheasant and wild rice casserole. Now, for you hungry folks who like bear, this was the year. Plates were heaped with all three versions of bear. Bear roast, bear steak and bear meat loaf were offered as a unit . . . They have never charge of the serving table taken by area hunters, Ver- own business, Trustee of the been able to do this. and one other program. She mont Game folks and other Library, Clerk of the church, Marcia Tomlinson began will see to it, through a hunters. To distinguish the and soon =/ her stint with the Game "l Game Supper a national event I I 4 iON-CAMERA--TV crew from Channel 4 Bradford's recent Wild Game Supper. News Magazine from Boston shoot table full of wild game at meticulous program of notes and schedules, that the 2900 pounds of game is cooked and ready. To be more specific, to feed the 1,000 ticket holders and members of the staff shifts, the organizers need four wild boars, 100 rabbits, 3 bears, 12 beavers, 40 coons, 40 pheasants, one small buffalo (or half a large one), eight deer and usually at least 100 pounds of other meats. OK, the big stuff is out of the way.., what about the other things that make the Game Supper so popular? They need 1200 pounds of assorted vegetables. They need over 1100 portions of ginger bread, up to 2500 rolls and 30 quarts of whipping cream. That is quite a menu for a continuous six types of game, up to 17,000 toothpicks of assorted colors are inserted each piece of meat so the diner may determine the bear from the venison or ram. Each plate bearer is issued a small card, indicating what the various colors refer to. On the magic day as 3:00 nears, the pace inside the notable White Church on Main street picks up. This year, things were running smoothly as the Evening Magazine team out of Channel 4 in Boston set up their gear to film the event. Announcer Barry No}an told the Journal Opinion the show will be on television in about six weeks. Preparations a week prior to the supper are intense. The intricate schedule reflects a She said the event is not a local time. Rather. it has grown from the early for- mative days of 1957 into a national event. She mentions regular customers coming from Tennessee, Florida, the West Coast, Arizona. Channel 5 from Boston has covered the event in the past. and in 1971 the dinner was named as one of the top 20 national events by the Discover America group. They have had to limit seating to 1,000 because of the increasing scarcity of game and that "the number is comfortable to serve. Over 1,000 and it is late at night and the workers are tired. So it remains at 1,000. Heading the menu are a variety of meats, including bear steak, venison roasts. Supper for this year on Saturday Nov. 12, when Buffalo boneless roasts were cooked. Monday Nov. 15 was venison day, when the 325 degree ovens cooked the venison in a marinade with celery and onions. Ken Vit- turn, George Durgin, John Knight, Charlie Stimson, Bud Cole sliced away on thi project. Bear day was the following day. Clove garlic marinade, salt pork bits, with celery and onion surrounded the meat. Slicing and picking bones were Bud Cole, Ken Vittum and George Durgin. Smoked boar was featured on Wed. Nov. 17 after Rev. John Knight picked up the critter in Burlington. (please turn to page I0)