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December 1, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-December 1, 1982 [)RTHEAST PUBIASItl NG (OMPANY] inc. Publisher of Journal | Opinion Weekly nowspepor pvbJ|kod in Brudford, Vermont. $ob|crtptton rotes - Vermont and New Humpsbbo - $9.00 per your; $6,00 fur six mons; oot ef suite - $12.00 per your end $7.00 for six months; Senior citizen discount $2.00. hond cbll polli petd ot |redford, Vermont 05033. Pobitskod by Northeast Publishing Company, |no., P,O. Ilex $70, Imdferd. Robert F. tluminski President & Publisher v Bradford :   Woodsville 02-222-528 !  , 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper 00Editorial--00'0000 Why wash fire trucks? We were interested to see in a press release sent us recently that the N.H. Dept. of Employment Security is touting about a suspect they recently had in court who pleaded guilty to 34 various counts of welfare fraud. District Court Judge James Davis lowered the following sentences on the thief, a resident of Keene. He was sentenced to nine months in jail, but this was suspended (or set aside) on the condition he perform 90 days of community service work. On other counts he was fined $500. and half of that was suspended. And on his third count of taking public funds, he was fined $500., with half of that suspended, or set aside. The remaining counts of fraud were continued for sentencing, perhaps at some later time. OK, so now our subject has 90 days of community work to do and has total fines to pay of $400. Judge Davis said he also must be disqualified from going back ml the ware rolls for one entire year and that he should pay back over $4,000. to the welfare department. The sentencing, to us, seems flabby. Here is someone who was convicted of stealing public funds and received 90 days of community work. Washing police cars and fire trucks or shovelling snow is easy stuff. Or putting a coat of paint on some library. And to suspend fines is ludicrous. And to even bother to levy fines, and then to turn around and suspend the payment of those fines is insane. Since when did someone who stole welfare monies really care about paying hack fines? To deny the convicted felon more welfare for 52 wee is soft and the order to repay $4,000. back to the state is to be a dreamer at best. In talking the matter over with two judges down state, they indicate it is unwise to fine the poor. They have no ability to pay. And when a welfare recipient steals money from the public and is ordered to pay it hack, along with some token fines, the taxpayer is coming up short, because in most liklihood, the money is repaid at such a slow rate, if it is paid back at all. What is suggested then, is a stint in Jailtime. those close behind you, you know you've been convicted of serious wrongdoing. Because when someone steals from honest hard-working taxpayers who support the welfare system, com- munity games and suspended fines are not the way to go. Support Operation Santa Claus In this issue of your Journal Opinion there is a story of the Lions Club and their Operation Santa Claus, where they spomor a program to present a nice Christmas package of gifts, clothes and health care items to 100 of the area's most needy children. It is headed up by Larry Coffin. We feel this is a good program and for the group to find just 100 kids out of the multitude of names submitted is a hard task. They qualify the names to the best of their ability and the 100 lucky youngsters will be having a full package before them on Christmas morning. The Boston Globe Newspaper began a program similar to this some years ago, sending gifts to their city's most needy children. It has been a smashing success and has grown to proportions beyond their wildest imagination. We hope Larry Coffin and the Lions have so much success with their Fourth Annual Operation Santa Claus that they have to start next year's program earlier to accept additional names for consideration. It is an excellent program and very important for some of our young friends out there who really deserve more out of life, especially at Christmas. So, dig deep for this special event. The Lions, Larry Coffin and Operation Santa Claus need your help to make some kid, somewhere in our area just a little happier on Christmas morning. Chances are, that happiness will spread to the next day, perhaps the next and some of the problems of being needy will be forgotten by them for awhile. TV TIMD--Game Supper Co-Chairman Eris Eastman and Barry Nolan of Channel 4, Boston chat about his full plate of delicious game for a future TV show. nxTgR THE %3 Se00,on Pond... a wilderness retreat SEYON POND Mr. and Mrs. Arland Robit- zer.) (Last week we told about the early history of Darling Beavers Pond, which became Seyon The Robitzers were soon Pond while owned by Harry introduced to an animal which Noyes, then wassold in 1955to was to become a source of t" the pond was only partially ice-free, they became aware of the swimming heads, the tail-slappings, and several mounds of homes that were in the shallower coves. When they were able to follow the up into the hills, they discovered that the entire watershed, an area of several square miles, was dotted with beaver ponds, perhaps two dozen, some as large as an acre, and six to eight feet deep. By inquiring they found out that in the 1920's, beavers had been virtually extinct in Vermont, there having been no laws to control trapping. In 1930, Harry Noyes imported a dozen pairs of beavers from New Brunswick and "plan- amusement, a mild irritant, ted" and somewhat of a threat to then in his lake. Their their income -- a hardy, descendants were so clever fellow whom they never numerous that they became really conquered -- the quite a problem. tireless beaver. The Robitzers had hoped In the spring, even while to use the pond and its trout for a source of income, but during their first summer they realized that the water flow into the pond was too sluggish and too warm, driving the trout into a hibernative state in the deeper pools. Older residents told them that it had not always been this way, and it became evident that the beaver dams were slowing the water flow, besides exposing the water too much to the sun in the many shallow beaver ponds. With this knowledge, the Robitzers set out to pull apart the dams, one by one -- but they soon discovered what an impossible task it was, as an J / .' I/' /,/, '/:/ / ' . , - ! , -. Letters to the Editor__) . Executive Councilor tells us more Highway. A consultant contract was approved to be offered to Paul Doherty by the Governor and Council on Nov. 5 on a vote of 4 to 1. Ronald Poltak was ap- proved as the new Parks Director on a vote of 3 to 2. I voted for Mr. Poltak. Given the circumstances, I believe District One came out of this event very well. Dr. Richard Barber is from Lit- tleton, a former businessman from this area of the state and with economic opportunities needed in this area of New Hampshire, I was most happy to see Mr. Gilman bring this name to the Governor and Council. At the same time, Paul Doherty was offered a service contract to continue his contribution to this area of our state. I know and respect that you will not always agree on every matter that I vote on as your representative to the Council in Concord. This was a close one I had to call and believe that in the best interests of the District and the State, we took the appropriate course. Raymond S. Burton Councilor, District One EDITOR'S NOTE: Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton for District One in New Hampshire is responding to an editorial titled "Tell us more, Mr. Burton" published in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal Opinion. To the Editor: Since January of 1982, I have had contact with a number of people, including your contact, concerning the pending nominatio of people to the posts of Commissioner, Director of Parks, Director of Forests, and Director of Economic Development in the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development. New Hamp- shire law provides very clearby that the commissioner is nominated to thCouncil by the Governor and that the commissioner nominates to the Governor and Council the Directors of Parks, Economic Development and Forests. Early on, Commissioner George Gilman made it clear that he desired re- appointment. Mr. Gilman was re-nominated and confirmed by a unanimous vote of the five member Council. Mr. Gilman also brought to the Council and the Governor, Dr. Richard Barber of Littleton for Economic Development, Cleve Kapala of Canterbury for Parks, and Ted NaKi of Pembroke for Forests Director. Mr. Kapala did not receive confirmation. Thus the current parks director Paul Doherty was left in a holdover status. Mr. Gilman then brought to the Council and Governor the name of Ronald Poltak of Manchester. In an Oct. 4, 1982 letter Mr. Gilman states to the Governor and Council: "Mr. Poltak has over 15 years experience in state government and is fully familiar with resources agencies, particularly the Division of Parks. His ex- perience in budgeting, the legislative process and in government generally will serve the Division and the Department well." It has been my belief all along that should Paul Doherty be replaced by his own boss, that there should be some role to retain his vast experience in the Mr. Washington Commission (which voted unanimously on Oct. 12, 1982 to retain Mr. Doberty) and Mr. Doherty, in my judgement, can be ex- tremely helpful in the 8 year, 70 million dollar project of the Franconia Notch Park and Harvest time for seniors To all the staff and volt.,,- teers, thanks again for a start in the up-coming holiday spirit. Jeanette L. Wornall Wells River, Vt. Newbury, who tickled the ivories, did much to put us into the spirit of Thanksgiving, to know that to be an American is an honor. God has blessed us greatly. Thank/n00 our renresentat/ve To the Editor: For heavens sakes, didn't we have a wonderful turnout for our Thanksgiving Senior Citizen Luncheon at the Wells River Congregational ChUrch in Wells River. Sue Goodwin, Site Manager, Paul and Ester Hinman have our most grateful blessings for the delicious food they prepared for 87 people. Our tables were beautifully decorated by volunteers acid most appreciated by all. The sing-a-long led by Gladys Vigent accompanied by Mrs. Thompson of problem on which vital in- formation was needed. Also, on the tragic accident and death of a grandson and son, Donald Blodgett. It was comforting to know we have a legislator who could take the time to extend his sympathy to our bereaved family. Our many thanks to you Wayne. George & Ruth EHe Eugene & Phyllis Davis Joseph Bledgett Corinth, Vt. To the Editor: We wish to let everyone know about the thoughtfulness of our representative, Wayne Kenyon. He recently helped with a Contributions to'our "Letters TO The Editor" should submit name and address with your letter. We will withhold your name if eir- cumstances warrant; however, we do not accept anonymous or unsigned material. Letters should he addressed to: Editor, Journal Opinion, Main street, Bradford, Vt. 05033. time to go home. But which way was home? Cliff claimed to know the area and he pointed "that-a-way" for home -- but Mr. Robitzer's compass indicated Cliff's "that-a-way" to be toward Montpelier, so he told him, "You go your way and I'll follow the brook/' (fervently hoping the brook led to Seyon and not some other pond). Soon he heard a thrashing noise behind him, and there Part 2 was Cliff. Together they followed the brook as best they could in the darkness, even- tually finding their way home. They never really conquered the beavers, but they did keep them from rebuilding their dams in the feeder streams. Many of the beavers remained as bank dwellers, making their homes in deep tunnels in places where the streams had high banks. They continued to come into the lake, where they were welcome -- although at least one fisherman unin- tentionally hooked onto one with a fly and thereby lost an expensive reel and line. Many a time, Mr. and Mrs. Robitzer, relaxing and daydreaming in a canoe, were suddenly startled speechless by a loud tail-slap almost in their faces. Opening to the public afternoon's hard work of The Robitzers' plans tearing out the dams was centered around establishing repaired by the beavers a high quality fishing camp, so before the next morning, with that in mind they Retreating in defeat, the repaired and spruced up their Robitzers consulted the Vermont Fish & Game Department, and shortly a warden was at their door. They discussed live-trapping the beavers to move them elsewhere, but the terrain was judged to be too remote and difficult (although there had been someone coming in on snowshoes from .the back side of the property, trapping beavers and leaving skun carcasses strewn around). The only alternative seemed to be dynamiting the dams, as suggested by their old friend Cliff Darling, the road agent. So one hot mor- ning Mr. Robitzer and Cliff set out, loaded down with dynamite, explosive caps, and Hastings in GREEN BAY, WISC. Student musicians Laurie Hastings and Chuck Dotas will be joined by other University of Wisconsin-Green Bay musicians when they perform m recital Saturday, Dec. 4. The program begins at 2:30 p.m. in the Environmental Sciences Auditorium and admission is free. Laurie's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Carroll T. Hastings of Woodsville. She is a graduate of Woodsville High School. Hastings, a flutist, will be buildings and prepared sleeping dozen paying guests.. They decided that! the pond quiet they would not motors on it -- hut difficult, because d and through the frequently had and energy guests' boats up to end of the pond, wind. As soon as the ( ready, they advertising establishment, modest ads in newspaper, Times and the Journal. At were only a gradually they eventually that they could tracted largely mouth. This when people's were changing, them were Europe or the but the Seyon gravitated to the people who liked a fishing spot, fashioned commodations. Of most desirable ones who knew about fishing or to learn, were with conservation generally get along with. - Seyon was as a hunting hunting as well as eventually that their best come was logging they had to learn and error before successful. recital accompanied Elaine Becker in "Sonata in A Cesar Franck, and Fantaisie," For her parts of Claude "Suite for Flute Piano," joined by pianist Paul Sowinski She is a senior education. as an exchange the Crane School the State York, Potsdam. a detonator attached to a long wire. The dynamite did the job, and their only real problem was to avoid the flying logs and sticks. However, long before nightfall, both men had been ill several times from inhaling too many fumes from the spent nitroglycerin. By twilight they had blown all the dams and it was Mobile home sued for violations MONTPELIER-- A mobile The |awsuit home manufacturer is being Washington sued for violation of Ver- alleges tha mont's Consumer Fraud Act, Manufactured according to Attorney General has sold John J. Easton, Jr.'s Public homes in Protection Division. inadequate and heating__ systems. RoadblockNermont The Vermont deer season ended last Sunday night. And to greet that ending was a comprehensive read block at the Bradford intersection of Route 25 and Interstate 91. Motorists going north, south, east or west could not avoid coming into the clutches of the assortment of Vermont Fish and Game vehicles and the Vermont State Police. They placed vehicles at the intersection so every vehicle through the area was stopped. As we approached the scene, a Fish and Game Officer leaned toward the window and asked if we had a nice day? Yes. Do yon have any weapons in the vehicle? No, Sir. Do you have any .deer in the vehicle? No, Sir, sorry to say. Thank you, Sir, he says and off we go. We pull over to the side and watch the proceeding. Every car and truck is stopped and some given a safety check; lights, etc., to make sure everything is operating in a safe manner. See the funny green car approaching the roadblock. See the funny green car slap on its breaks and do a hasty U turn and proceed off in the opposite direction. No roadblock for the green car. Now, see another green and yellow car start off and catch up to the green car. Come to find out, the operator had no license to drive. And there were other things discovered at these road blocks. Last weekend at the Newbury Bridge in N. Haverhill, the New Hampshire Fish and Game, the state police and both Vermont agencies had as many as nine units at the bridge to stop traffic and check for illegal game tran- sport. Most of these blocks yield many* violations and found among other things, a driver operating on a revoked license. And there have been illegal deer found and confiscated. We have noticed continuing presence of the Fish and Game combinations and it appears it is well worth the time and ef- fort to direct these type of operations. Of course, the detractors don't like it... but isn't that too bad for them? Traffic activity is very revealing and most people are happy to see lots of police Iresence in and around the Bradford area. One thing Commissioner of Fish and involved with his various are at a loss to find out how he complish so much. Gary of activity and his devotion to long hours is amazing. He nine to fiver and his efforts will his department and fellow Meanwhile ba are running smoothly. are some lines beginning to seems irritated. We figure approach to the vehicle and the' polite and cheery. Here loaded with funny dividuais. It is a musical those real acid type units. gentlemen, the Fish and inquires. "Hi. ask. Nothing, Sir, just a rear of the van is opened and assortment of musical clothes, music sheets, stands, food, pillows and I think we some kind. The occupants sent on their way York. And so it goes. Last week at the ] Crossing, there was a a venison detector. This was Labrador Retriever typ name was Meghan. by New Hampshire F'mh Sergeant Rick Estes and e before, -to look for. A short time ']tre ched Meghan sniff passing ca,_ Estes associates jammed a vefI "- up under the wheel well of a poliCe They asked Estes and Meghan to the vehicle to see if Meghan buried treasure. Within I0 second/ sniffed the entire vehicle and  "underneath the wheel well, kn well what was hidden there. [ We know of another dog used I and Game officials that smells  She is used to ferret out illegal  protected fish in New Hampshire. Times are getting so tough, the J.* won t even be able to hide It*  anymore, p Page 4-The Journal Opinion-December 1, 1982 [)RTHEAST PUBIASItl NG (OMPANY] inc. Publisher of Journal | Opinion Weekly nowspepor pvbJ|kod in Brudford, Vermont. $ob|crtptton rotes - Vermont and New Humpsbbo - $9.00 per your; $6,00 fur six mons; oot ef suite - $12.00 per your end $7.00 for six months; Senior citizen discount $2.00. hond cbll polli petd ot |redford, Vermont 05033. Pobitskod by Northeast Publishing Company, |no., P,O. Ilex $70, Imdferd. Robert F. tluminski President & Publisher v Bradford :   Woodsville 02-222-528 !  , 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper 00Editorial--00'0000 Why wash fire trucks? We were interested to see in a press release sent us recently that the N.H. Dept. of Employment Security is touting about a suspect they recently had in court who pleaded guilty to 34 various counts of welfare fraud. District Court Judge James Davis lowered the following sentences on the thief, a resident of Keene. He was sentenced to nine months in jail, but this was suspended (or set aside) on the condition he perform 90 days of community service work. On other counts he was fined $500. and half of that was suspended. And on his third count of taking public funds, he was fined $500., with half of that suspended, or set aside. The remaining counts of fraud were continued for sentencing, perhaps at some later time. OK, so now our subject has 90 days of community work to do and has total fines to pay of $400. Judge Davis said he also must be disqualified from going back ml the ware rolls for one entire year and that he should pay back over $4,000. to the welfare department. The sentencing, to us, seems flabby. Here is someone who was convicted of stealing public funds and received 90 days of community work. Washing police cars and fire trucks or shovelling snow is easy stuff. Or putting a coat of paint on some library. And to suspend fines is ludicrous. And to even bother to levy fines, and then to turn around and suspend the payment of those fines is insane. Since when did someone who stole welfare monies really care about paying hack fines? To deny the convicted felon more welfare for 52 wee is soft and the order to repay $4,000. back to the state is to be a dreamer at best. In talking the matter over with two judges down state, they indicate it is unwise to fine the poor. They have no ability to pay. And when a welfare recipient steals money from the public and is ordered to pay it hack, along with some token fines, the taxpayer is coming up short, because in most liklihood, the money is repaid at such a slow rate, if it is paid back at all. What is suggested then, is a stint in Jailtime. those close behind you, you know you've been convicted of serious wrongdoing. Because when someone steals from honest hard-working taxpayers who support the welfare system, com- munity games and suspended fines are not the way to go. Support Operation Santa Claus In this issue of your Journal Opinion there is a story of the Lions Club and their Operation Santa Claus, where they spomor a program to present a nice Christmas package of gifts, clothes and health care items to 100 of the area's most needy children. It is headed up by Larry Coffin. We feel this is a good program and for the group to find just 100 kids out of the multitude of names submitted is a hard task. They qualify the names to the best of their ability and the 100 lucky youngsters will be having a full package before them on Christmas morning. The Boston Globe Newspaper began a program similar to this some years ago, sending gifts to their city's most needy children. It has been a smashing success and has grown to proportions beyond their wildest imagination. We hope Larry Coffin and the Lions have so much success with their Fourth Annual Operation Santa Claus that they have to start next year's program earlier to accept additional names for consideration. It is an excellent program and very important for some of our young friends out there who really deserve more out of life, especially at Christmas. So, dig deep for this special event. The Lions, Larry Coffin and Operation Santa Claus need your help to make some kid, somewhere in our area just a little happier on Christmas morning. Chances are, that happiness will spread to the next day, perhaps the next and some of the problems of being needy will be forgotten by them for awhile. TV TIMD--Game Supper Co-Chairman Eris Eastman and Barry Nolan of Channel 4, Boston chat about his full plate of delicious game for a future TV show. nxTgR THE %3 Se00,on Pond... a wilderness retreat SEYON POND Mr. and Mrs. Arland Robit- zer.) (Last week we told about the early history of Darling Beavers Pond, which became Seyon The Robitzers were soon Pond while owned by Harry introduced to an animal which Noyes, then wassold in 1955to was to become a source of t" the pond was only partially ice-free, they became aware of the swimming heads, the tail-slappings, and several mounds of homes that were in the shallower coves. When they were able to follow the up into the hills, they discovered that the entire watershed, an area of several square miles, was dotted with beaver ponds, perhaps two dozen, some as large as an acre, and six to eight feet deep. By inquiring they found out that in the 1920's, beavers had been virtually extinct in Vermont, there having been no laws to control trapping. In 1930, Harry Noyes imported a dozen pairs of beavers from New Brunswick and "plan- amusement, a mild irritant, ted" and somewhat of a threat to then in his lake. Their their income -- a hardy, descendants were so clever fellow whom they never numerous that they became really conquered -- the quite a problem. tireless beaver. The Robitzers had hoped In the spring, even while to use the pond and its trout for a source of income, but during their first summer they realized that the water flow into the pond was too sluggish and too warm, driving the trout into a hibernative state in the deeper pools. Older residents told them that it had not always been this way, and it became evident that the beaver dams were slowing the water flow, besides exposing the water too much to the sun in the many shallow beaver ponds. With this knowledge, the Robitzers set out to pull apart the dams, one by one -- but they soon discovered what an impossible task it was, as an J / .' I/' /,/, '/:/ / ' . , - ! , -. Letters to the Editor__) . Executive Councilor tells us more Highway. A consultant contract was approved to be offered to Paul Doherty by the Governor and Council on Nov. 5 on a vote of 4 to 1. Ronald Poltak was ap- proved as the new Parks Director on a vote of 3 to 2. I voted for Mr. Poltak. Given the circumstances, I believe District One came out of this event very well. Dr. Richard Barber is from Lit- tleton, a former businessman from this area of the state and with economic opportunities needed in this area of New Hampshire, I was most happy to see Mr. Gilman bring this name to the Governor and Council. At the same time, Paul Doherty was offered a service contract to continue his contribution to this area of our state. I know and respect that you will not always agree on every matter that I vote on as your representative to the Council in Concord. This was a close one I had to call and believe that in the best interests of the District and the State, we took the appropriate course. Raymond S. Burton Councilor, District One EDITOR'S NOTE: Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton for District One in New Hampshire is responding to an editorial titled "Tell us more, Mr. Burton" published in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal Opinion. To the Editor: Since January of 1982, I have had contact with a number of people, including your contact, concerning the pending nominatio of people to the posts of Commissioner, Director of Parks, Director of Forests, and Director of Economic Development in the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development. New Hamp- shire law provides very clearby that the commissioner is nominated to thCouncil by the Governor and that the commissioner nominates to the Governor and Council the Directors of Parks, Economic Development and Forests. Early on, Commissioner George Gilman made it clear that he desired re- appointment. Mr. Gilman was re-nominated and confirmed by a unanimous vote of the five member Council. Mr. Gilman also brought to the Council and the Governor, Dr. Richard Barber of Littleton for Economic Development, Cleve Kapala of Canterbury for Parks, and Ted NaKi of Pembroke for Forests Director. Mr. Kapala did not receive confirmation. Thus the current parks director Paul Doherty was left in a holdover status. Mr. Gilman then brought to the Council and Governor the name of Ronald Poltak of Manchester. In an Oct. 4, 1982 letter Mr. Gilman states to the Governor and Council: "Mr. Poltak has over 15 years experience in state government and is fully familiar with resources agencies, particularly the Division of Parks. His ex- perience in budgeting, the legislative process and in government generally will serve the Division and the Department well." It has been my belief all along that should Paul Doherty be replaced by his own boss, that there should be some role to retain his vast experience in the Mr. Washington Commission (which voted unanimously on Oct. 12, 1982 to retain Mr. Doberty) and Mr. Doherty, in my judgement, can be ex- tremely helpful in the 8 year, 70 million dollar project of the Franconia Notch Park and Harvest time for seniors To all the staff and volt.,,- teers, thanks again for a start in the up-coming holiday spirit. Jeanette L. Wornall Wells River, Vt. Newbury, who tickled the ivories, did much to put us into the spirit of Thanksgiving, to know that to be an American is an honor. God has blessed us greatly. Thank/n00 our renresentat/ve To the Editor: For heavens sakes, didn't we have a wonderful turnout for our Thanksgiving Senior Citizen Luncheon at the Wells River Congregational ChUrch in Wells River. Sue Goodwin, Site Manager, Paul and Ester Hinman have our most grateful blessings for the delicious food they prepared for 87 people. Our tables were beautifully decorated by volunteers acid most appreciated by all. The sing-a-long led by Gladys Vigent accompanied by Mrs. Thompson of problem on which vital in- formation was needed. Also, on the tragic accident and death of a grandson and son, Donald Blodgett. It was comforting to know we have a legislator who could take the time to extend his sympathy to our bereaved family. Our many thanks to you Wayne. George & Ruth EHe Eugene & Phyllis Davis Joseph Bledgett Corinth, Vt. To the Editor: We wish to let everyone know about the thoughtfulness of our representative, Wayne Kenyon. He recently helped with a Contributions to'our "Letters TO The Editor" should submit name and address with your letter. We will withhold your name if eir- cumstances warrant; however, we do not accept anonymous or unsigned material. Letters should he addressed to: Editor, Journal Opinion, Main street, Bradford, Vt. 05033. time to go home. But which way was home? Cliff claimed to know the area and he pointed "that-a-way" for home -- but Mr. Robitzer's compass indicated Cliff's "that-a-way" to be toward Montpelier, so he told him, "You go your way and I'll follow the brook/' (fervently hoping the brook led to Seyon and not some other pond). Soon he heard a thrashing noise behind him, and there Part 2 was Cliff. Together they followed the brook as best they could in the darkness, even- tually finding their way home. They never really conquered the beavers, but they did keep them from rebuilding their dams in the feeder streams. Many of the beavers remained as bank dwellers, making their homes in deep tunnels in places where the streams had high banks. They continued to come into the lake, where they were welcome -- although at least one fisherman unin- tentionally hooked onto one with a fly and thereby lost an expensive reel and line. Many a time, Mr. and Mrs. Robitzer, relaxing and daydreaming in a canoe, were suddenly startled speechless by a loud tail-slap almost in their faces. Opening to the public afternoon's hard work of The Robitzers' plans tearing out the dams was centered around establishing repaired by the beavers a high quality fishing camp, so before the next morning, with that in mind they Retreating in defeat, the repaired and spruced up their Robitzers consulted the Vermont Fish & Game Department, and shortly a warden was at their door. They discussed live-trapping the beavers to move them elsewhere, but the terrain was judged to be too remote and difficult (although there had been someone coming in on snowshoes from .the back side of the property, trapping beavers and leaving skun carcasses strewn around). The only alternative seemed to be dynamiting the dams, as suggested by their old friend Cliff Darling, the road agent. So one hot mor- ning Mr. Robitzer and Cliff set out, loaded down with dynamite, explosive caps, and Hastings in GREEN BAY, WISC. Student musicians Laurie Hastings and Chuck Dotas will be joined by other University of Wisconsin-Green Bay musicians when they perform m recital Saturday, Dec. 4. The program begins at 2:30 p.m. in the Environmental Sciences Auditorium and admission is free. Laurie's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Carroll T. Hastings of Woodsville. She is a graduate of Woodsville High School. Hastings, a flutist, will be buildings and prepared sleeping dozen paying guests.. They decided that! the pond quiet they would not motors on it -- hut difficult, because d and through the frequently had and energy guests' boats up to end of the pond, wind. As soon as the ( ready, they advertising establishment, modest ads in newspaper, Times and the Journal. At were only a gradually they eventually that they could tracted largely mouth. This when people's were changing, them were Europe or the but the Seyon gravitated to the people who liked a fishing spot, fashioned commodations. Of most desirable ones who knew about fishing or to learn, were with conservation generally get along with. - Seyon was as a hunting hunting as well as eventually that their best come was logging they had to learn and error before successful. recital accompanied Elaine Becker in "Sonata in A Cesar Franck, and Fantaisie," For her parts of Claude "Suite for Flute Piano," joined by pianist Paul Sowinski She is a senior education. as an exchange the Crane School the State York, Potsdam. a detonator attached to a long wire. The dynamite did the job, and their only real problem was to avoid the flying logs and sticks. However, long before nightfall, both men had been ill several times from inhaling too many fumes from the spent nitroglycerin. By twilight they had blown all the dams and it was Mobile home sued for violations MONTPELIER-- A mobile The |awsuit home manufacturer is being Washington sued for violation of Ver- alleges tha mont's Consumer Fraud Act, Manufactured according to Attorney General has sold John J. Easton, Jr.'s Public homes in Protection Division. inadequate and heating__ systems. RoadblockNermont The Vermont deer season ended last Sunday night. And to greet that ending was a comprehensive read block at the Bradford intersection of Route 25 and Interstate 91. Motorists going north, south, east or west could not avoid coming into the clutches of the assortment of Vermont Fish and Game vehicles and the Vermont State Police. They placed vehicles at the intersection so every vehicle through the area was stopped. As we approached the scene, a Fish and Game Officer leaned toward the window and asked if we had a nice day? Yes. Do yon have any weapons in the vehicle? No, Sir. Do you have any .deer in the vehicle? No, Sir, sorry to say. Thank you, Sir, he says and off we go. We pull over to the side and watch the proceeding. Every car and truck is stopped and some given a safety check; lights, etc., to make sure everything is operating in a safe manner. See the funny green car approaching the roadblock. See the funny green car slap on its breaks and do a hasty U turn and proceed off in the opposite direction. No roadblock for the green car. Now, see another green and yellow car start off and catch up to the green car. Come to find out, the operator had no license to drive. And there were other things discovered at these road blocks. Last weekend at the Newbury Bridge in N. Haverhill, the New Hampshire Fish and Game, the state police and both Vermont agencies had as many as nine units at the bridge to stop traffic and check for illegal game tran- sport. Most of these blocks yield many* violations and found among other things, a driver operating on a revoked license. And there have been illegal deer found and confiscated. We have noticed continuing presence of the Fish and Game combinations and it appears it is well worth the time and ef- fort to direct these type of operations. Of course, the detractors don't like it... but isn't that too bad for them? Traffic activity is very revealing and most people are happy to see lots of police Iresence in and around the Bradford area. One thing Commissioner of Fish and involved with his various are at a loss to find out how he complish so much. Gary of activity and his devotion to long hours is amazing. He nine to fiver and his efforts will his department and fellow Meanwhile ba are running smoothly. are some lines beginning to seems irritated. We figure approach to the vehicle and the' polite and cheery. Here loaded with funny dividuais. It is a musical those real acid type units. gentlemen, the Fish and inquires. "Hi. ask. Nothing, Sir, just a rear of the van is opened and assortment of musical clothes, music sheets, stands, food, pillows and I think we some kind. The occupants sent on their way York. And so it goes. Last week at the ] Crossing, there was a a venison detector. This was Labrador Retriever typ name was Meghan. by New Hampshire F'mh Sergeant Rick Estes and e before, -to look for. A short time ']tre ched Meghan sniff passing ca,_ Estes associates jammed a vefI "- up under the wheel well of a poliCe They asked Estes and Meghan to the vehicle to see if Meghan buried treasure. Within I0 second/ sniffed the entire vehicle and  "underneath the wheel well, kn well what was hidden there. [ We know of another dog used I and Game officials that smells  She is used to ferret out illegal  protected fish in New Hampshire. Times are getting so tough, the J.* won t even be able to hide It*  anymore, p