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Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
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December 2, 1981     Journal Opinion
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December 2, 1981
 

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Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont IT A FRi OSS ES AHEAD--After weeks of rain and-or cloudy days, 5 in Newlmry, Vermont. Snow is on the horizon as the area was  peeking through in the above scene taken on Route given a blanket of white over the weekend. GLANOF ...... VERM ts 00lngressman explains tax cu lor to the tax estimated $37 Idl: on :mxt aftez the tax cuts re fllly th. reduction will increase to I me thos 'rage working year, $100 billion in 1983, and implemented, taxes will be 10 percent. This will eliminate is increased L 57 percent of aal earnings in government. worked from h July for the. according to! l'e Pep. Judd the tax cut rgence of a new :t lets people hard earned easure will cut )me taxes an billion next after the tax cuts are fully the reduction will increase to home by those aged55 or over, ? the quality of own Reports b  tnunicipalities ) '| the James P. i Town Report by the UVlVl dee and the 1590 billion by 1986, he added. Individual Tax Cuts Tax Cuts -- Rates will be cut by 25 percent over the next three years beginning with a 5 percent cut effective October 1, 1981, a 10 percent cut July 1, 1982, and a final 10 percent reduction July 1, 1983. If you have your taxes withheld from your paycheck, this additional income will be automatically adjusted, says Gregg. Indexing -- Starting in 1985 inistration- bivision. Wards of Merit to recognize ich met basic ng financial fficer reports ,,, ,,, ecified in- VI litionally, 17 cial the report awards Thetford, Middlebury, government. The Stratford, Barre Town, North- field Village, Sherburne and Woodstock. The judges for the Town Report Contest included the following: Ann Ovitt, Agency of Administration-Public Records Division; Janice Karwoski and Marie Car- penter, Town Clerks and Ti'easurers Association; and Bill Bingham and Ernie Saunders, UVM Extension Service Community and Rural Development Program. The purpose of the James P. Taylor Town Report Contest is indexed to the rate of inflation, the marriage tax penalty for $125,000, effective This prevents increases in 90 percent of the two wage 1985. taxes because of income gains earner families, said Gregg. Savings Incentives that represent inflation and Savings Certificates -- Individual Retirement not an increase in real pur- According to Gregg, banks, Accounts (IRA's) and Keogh chasing power, the savings and loans institutes, Plans -- The maximum congressman said. credit unions, etc. are able to deductible for IRA's is in- Marriage Penalty -- This issue one-year saving cer- creased to $2,000. Under the will allow a married couple tificates that would earn in- Keogh Plan for self-employed filing a joint return in 1982 to terest at 70 percent of the one- individuals, the maximum deduct 5 percent of up to year Treasury bill rate. This deductible contribution is $30,000, from the income of the interest will be tax free up to increased from $7,500 to spouse with the lower ear- $2,000.00. $15,000. These changes take nings. In 1983, and thereafter, Child Care -- A 30 percent effect January 1, 1982, ac- credit for child care is allowed cording to Gregg. to people with incomes of less Dividend and Interest than $10,000. This credit Exclusion -- Gregg said that phases down to where people repealed as of January 1, 1982, with $30,000 of income, or is the current $200 exclusion more, will receive a 20 percent ($400 for couples) allowed for credit, said Gregg. interest and dividend income, Charitable Contributions- and there is reimstated the According to Gregg, in-previous $100 ($200 for UVM Extension Service Community and Rural Development Specialists are available to work with towns to help ac- complish that goal. 1981 Town Report Contest Winners OUTSTANDING -- Nor- thfield Town, Thetford, Middlebury, Stratford, Barre Town, North field Village, Sherburne, and Woodstock. (please turn to page 3) . I SPS December 2, 1981 Petition drive to help save Vermont farmland A statewide petition dri,e future food supplies and our vironmentally sound and well Vermont should has been launched to help save self reliance." Vermont farmland. The Vermont Natural Organic Farmers Association (NOFA), has begun the effort to focus attention on the need to preserve Vermonts agricultural lands. "The National Agricultural Lands Study recently con- firmed that Vermont losses over 20,000 acres 'of agricultural land each year," according to Anthony Pollina of Vermont NOFA. "While some state officials are still arguing the exact figures," Pollina says, "the loss is staggering, and will have widespread and irreversible affects. It will hurt our economy and destroy our environment as well as our farmers. Most importantly, we are losing access to our The petition calls for a "halt to the destruction of agricultural land for in- dustrial-commercial and second home development until Vermont has an effective program to preserve our farmlands and to encourage a strong farm economy," It is a response Pollina said to the "evergrowing number of instances where farmland is being sacrificed for other uses, including highways, second homes and factories, even when alternate sites are available. Act 250 has also come under recent attack by developers who claim it is to great a burden to industrial development. But Act 250 has a real purpose." Pollina says, "to see to it that development within Vermont is en- MOBILE HOME GUTTED--- A blaze of unknown origin gutted this mobile home rented by See Ming. The alarm went off at 9:46 p,m. on Wednesday, Nov. 27. Bradford and Piermont Fire Departments dividuals who do not itemize couples) exclusion for their deductions will now he dividend income only. allowed to deduct 25 percent of Small Business WOODSVILLE-- Last week main ingredients are time and the first $100 of donations in Tax Cuts marked the mid-point for friendship. The segment will 1982. This deduction will in- Corporate Rates -- The Woodsville students involved run for a period of eight weeks crease to 100 percent of all congressman said the lowest in the North Country YMCA -- having group activities at contributions in 1986. corporate income tax rate will Youth Outreach Program. the final session. Sale of Residence -- be reduced from 17 percent on The intent of the program is to The Woodsville Youth According to Gregg, the one the first $25,000 of income, to create a positive one-to-one Outreach program involves time exclusion from tax of 16 percent in 1982, and 15 relationship with the child at students from the Junior class capital from the sale of a (please turntopage3) the elementary level. The two at Woodsville High School, YMCA Youth Outreach passes mid-piont mark the two week Artist-in- Resident program. Film ART AND CREATIVITY-- Ann Swanson's fourth grade class enthusiastically pursues the art of animation during the Artist in Residence program at Thetford Elementary School. matched with a younger elementary school serve as in- partner attending Woodsville school coordinators of the Elementary School. Tim program. Debi Clark, Wbalen, Guidance Counselor Asseciate Director North at Woodsville High School and Country YMCA is responsible Charles Meyers, Principal at for working with the high the Woodsville Elementary school Youth Outreach School and Kathy D'Alessio, Workers and overseeing all Special Needs Teacher at the (please turn to page 3) animation became part of the  normal school day at Thetford Elementary. Ann Swanson's fourth' grade and Mary Scattergood's sixth grade took part in the program. :  David Ehrlich, film maker spent nine school days, Nov. 2- 12, working with the two classes. Basic animation skills were learned and used to produce 15-second films for each student. During his free time, Ehrlich did mini projects with other classrooms to expose them to the art of animation. Ehrlich will return to the school for an evening film festival that parents will he invited to see the finished ojects in January. Under he direction of Arts Coor- dinator, Valerie Pilcher, students will work from now to then to add music to the animated films. This project was organized by the Orange East Arts Program arid funded by ACTION! CAMERA!-- Master Thefford Elementary School filming another and The Vermont Council on the Arts. project. Hoffman is seen student's work on an animation -- She is a staunch sup- porter of the school, willingly speaking, in public for teachers and students. -- She never criticizes or complaim. -- She is a willing worker, a loyal employee, a steadfast friend to anyone who seeks her help. The Blue Mt. Employee of the Month is a program initiated by the School Board to allow the community, students, parents, and em- ployees a chance to say thank you to someone they feel is worthy of recognition. Any employee can be nominated by submitting a statement in writing to either the principal or the superintendent. .2112 -5F2 ) St00 Navy as an ese, provided ' and taught in Alaska, tPloyed as a Virginia. In te courses ive health j s kept her Ith related :ipating in ,MT, child disorders, hearing learning he needs of d. Mrs. resident of eh led to her herself in a ralIce at Blue Mt. Union 1 .|,Tbe Blue professional manner at all llll Board has times. e October -- She maintains con- 4,Ionth. She is fidentiality. ,I It l,Vlllue, School -- She is knowledgeable in - Educator. her field. ,$1n, ,i ert,_ vt,. - She is approacbable. . . te of the -- She m reahstm. ermont, she -- She is understanding. ,ee of the Month be thought out. Act 250 does not strengthening its agriculture stop development. It can now, by diversifying its improve the quality of production base and development. One look at cultivating more local and Chittenden County will tell you regional markets. The loss of that industrial and corn-farms ripples through a mercial development in community. We also lose Vermont is quite healthy, agricultural industries that Agriculture, on the other hand farmers provide a base for, is in steady decline." and we hurt small business in "We are seeing industrial farming communities. developers competing with We also find more and more agriculture for available land. of our fertile and productive The farmers almost always land under the ownership and use. Not because we don't control of out of state business need farming but because interests. Worse of all, we are farmers can not compote with going to lose our capability to industrial corporations. They produce food here in Vermont. don't have the money or the We are hurt economically, political power. We feel it is environmentally and essential to show there is culturally, Yet state policy widespread support among makers and agricultural of. Vermonters to preserve ficials are moving much to farmland and keep our far- slow towards preserving land mers in business. (please turn to page 3) an Excellent to belptownofficiaisprepare animation at Thetford schools town reports informative town reports that Film 1 as Out-help the taxpayer make r in Vet- knowledgeable decisions !ield Town, about the operation of town responded to the alarm. The fire is under investigation within the Bradford Fire Department. The structure is located just off Mink Hill Road in Bradford and is owned by Helen Wflliamson. THETFORD--"This is fun!" was a common remark during Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont IT A FRi OSS ES AHEAD--After weeks of rain and-or cloudy days, 5 in Newlmry, Vermont. Snow is on the horizon as the area was  peeking through in the above scene taken on Route given a blanket of white over the weekend. GLANOF ...... VERM ts 00lngressman explains tax cu lor to the tax estimated $37 Idl: on :mxt aftez the tax cuts re fllly th. reduction will increase to I me thos 'rage working year, $100 billion in 1983, and implemented, taxes will be 10 percent. This will eliminate is increased L 57 percent of aal earnings in government. worked from h July for the. according to! l'e Pep. Judd the tax cut rgence of a new :t lets people hard earned easure will cut )me taxes an billion next after the tax cuts are fully the reduction will increase to home by those aged55 or over, ? the quality of own Reports b  tnunicipalities ) '| the James P. i Town Report by the UVlVl dee and the 1590 billion by 1986, he added. Individual Tax Cuts Tax Cuts -- Rates will be cut by 25 percent over the next three years beginning with a 5 percent cut effective October 1, 1981, a 10 percent cut July 1, 1982, and a final 10 percent reduction July 1, 1983. If you have your taxes withheld from your paycheck, this additional income will be automatically adjusted, says Gregg. Indexing -- Starting in 1985 inistration- bivision. Wards of Merit to recognize ich met basic ng financial fficer reports ,,, ,,, ecified in- VI litionally, 17 cial the report awards Thetford, Middlebury, government. The Stratford, Barre Town, North- field Village, Sherburne and Woodstock. The judges for the Town Report Contest included the following: Ann Ovitt, Agency of Administration-Public Records Division; Janice Karwoski and Marie Car- penter, Town Clerks and Ti'easurers Association; and Bill Bingham and Ernie Saunders, UVM Extension Service Community and Rural Development Program. The purpose of the James P. Taylor Town Report Contest is indexed to the rate of inflation, the marriage tax penalty for $125,000, effective This prevents increases in 90 percent of the two wage 1985. taxes because of income gains earner families, said Gregg. Savings Incentives that represent inflation and Savings Certificates -- Individual Retirement not an increase in real pur- According to Gregg, banks, Accounts (IRA's) and Keogh chasing power, the savings and loans institutes, Plans -- The maximum congressman said. credit unions, etc. are able to deductible for IRA's is in- Marriage Penalty -- This issue one-year saving cer- creased to $2,000. Under the will allow a married couple tificates that would earn in- Keogh Plan for self-employed filing a joint return in 1982 to terest at 70 percent of the one- individuals, the maximum deduct 5 percent of up to year Treasury bill rate. This deductible contribution is $30,000, from the income of the interest will be tax free up to increased from $7,500 to spouse with the lower ear- $2,000.00. $15,000. These changes take nings. In 1983, and thereafter, Child Care -- A 30 percent effect January 1, 1982, ac- credit for child care is allowed cording to Gregg. to people with incomes of less Dividend and Interest than $10,000. This credit Exclusion -- Gregg said that phases down to where people repealed as of January 1, 1982, with $30,000 of income, or is the current $200 exclusion more, will receive a 20 percent ($400 for couples) allowed for credit, said Gregg. interest and dividend income, Charitable Contributions- and there is reimstated the According to Gregg, in-previous $100 ($200 for UVM Extension Service Community and Rural Development Specialists are available to work with towns to help ac- complish that goal. 1981 Town Report Contest Winners OUTSTANDING -- Nor- thfield Town, Thetford, Middlebury, Stratford, Barre Town, North field Village, Sherburne, and Woodstock. (please turn to page 3) . I SPS December 2, 1981 Petition drive to help save Vermont farmland A statewide petition dri,e future food supplies and our vironmentally sound and well Vermont should has been launched to help save self reliance." Vermont farmland. The Vermont Natural Organic Farmers Association (NOFA), has begun the effort to focus attention on the need to preserve Vermonts agricultural lands. "The National Agricultural Lands Study recently con- firmed that Vermont losses over 20,000 acres 'of agricultural land each year," according to Anthony Pollina of Vermont NOFA. "While some state officials are still arguing the exact figures," Pollina says, "the loss is staggering, and will have widespread and irreversible affects. It will hurt our economy and destroy our environment as well as our farmers. Most importantly, we are losing access to our The petition calls for a "halt to the destruction of agricultural land for in- dustrial-commercial and second home development until Vermont has an effective program to preserve our farmlands and to encourage a strong farm economy," It is a response Pollina said to the "evergrowing number of instances where farmland is being sacrificed for other uses, including highways, second homes and factories, even when alternate sites are available. Act 250 has also come under recent attack by developers who claim it is to great a burden to industrial development. But Act 250 has a real purpose." Pollina says, "to see to it that development within Vermont is en- MOBILE HOME GUTTED--- A blaze of unknown origin gutted this mobile home rented by See Ming. The alarm went off at 9:46 p,m. on Wednesday, Nov. 27. Bradford and Piermont Fire Departments dividuals who do not itemize couples) exclusion for their deductions will now he dividend income only. allowed to deduct 25 percent of Small Business WOODSVILLE-- Last week main ingredients are time and the first $100 of donations in Tax Cuts marked the mid-point for friendship. The segment will 1982. This deduction will in- Corporate Rates -- The Woodsville students involved run for a period of eight weeks crease to 100 percent of all congressman said the lowest in the North Country YMCA -- having group activities at contributions in 1986. corporate income tax rate will Youth Outreach Program. the final session. Sale of Residence -- be reduced from 17 percent on The intent of the program is to The Woodsville Youth According to Gregg, the one the first $25,000 of income, to create a positive one-to-one Outreach program involves time exclusion from tax of 16 percent in 1982, and 15 relationship with the child at students from the Junior class capital from the sale of a (please turntopage3) the elementary level. The two at Woodsville High School, YMCA Youth Outreach passes mid-piont mark the two week Artist-in- Resident program. Film ART AND CREATIVITY-- Ann Swanson's fourth grade class enthusiastically pursues the art of animation during the Artist in Residence program at Thetford Elementary School. matched with a younger elementary school serve as in- partner attending Woodsville school coordinators of the Elementary School. Tim program. Debi Clark, Wbalen, Guidance Counselor Asseciate Director North at Woodsville High School and Country YMCA is responsible Charles Meyers, Principal at for working with the high the Woodsville Elementary school Youth Outreach School and Kathy D'Alessio, Workers and overseeing all Special Needs Teacher at the (please turn to page 3) animation became part of the  normal school day at Thetford Elementary. Ann Swanson's fourth' grade and Mary Scattergood's sixth grade took part in the program. :  David Ehrlich, film maker spent nine school days, Nov. 2- 12, working with the two classes. Basic animation skills were learned and used to produce 15-second films for each student. During his free time, Ehrlich did mini projects with other classrooms to expose them to the art of animation. Ehrlich will return to the school for an evening film festival that parents will he invited to see the finished ojects in January. Under he direction of Arts Coor- dinator, Valerie Pilcher, students will work from now to then to add music to the animated films. This project was organized by the Orange East Arts Program arid funded by ACTION! CAMERA!-- Master Thefford Elementary School filming another and The Vermont Council on the Arts. project. Hoffman is seen student's work on an animation -- She is a staunch sup- porter of the school, willingly speaking, in public for teachers and students. -- She never criticizes or complaim. -- She is a willing worker, a loyal employee, a steadfast friend to anyone who seeks her help. The Blue Mt. Employee of the Month is a program initiated by the School Board to allow the community, students, parents, and em- ployees a chance to say thank you to someone they feel is worthy of recognition. Any employee can be nominated by submitting a statement in writing to either the principal or the superintendent. .2112 -5F2 ) St00 Navy as an ese, provided ' and taught in Alaska, tPloyed as a Virginia. In te courses ive health j s kept her Ith related :ipating in ,MT, child disorders, hearing learning he needs of d. Mrs. resident of eh led to her herself in a ralIce at Blue Mt. Union 1 .|,Tbe Blue professional manner at all llll Board has times. e October -- She maintains con- 4,Ionth. She is fidentiality. ,I It l,Vlllue, School -- She is knowledgeable in - Educator. her field. ,$1n, ,i ert,_ vt,. - She is approacbable. . . te of the -- She m reahstm. ermont, she -- She is understanding. ,ee of the Month be thought out. Act 250 does not strengthening its agriculture stop development. It can now, by diversifying its improve the quality of production base and development. One look at cultivating more local and Chittenden County will tell you regional markets. The loss of that industrial and corn-farms ripples through a mercial development in community. We also lose Vermont is quite healthy, agricultural industries that Agriculture, on the other hand farmers provide a base for, is in steady decline." and we hurt small business in "We are seeing industrial farming communities. developers competing with We also find more and more agriculture for available land. of our fertile and productive The farmers almost always land under the ownership and use. Not because we don't control of out of state business need farming but because interests. Worse of all, we are farmers can not compote with going to lose our capability to industrial corporations. They produce food here in Vermont. don't have the money or the We are hurt economically, political power. We feel it is environmentally and essential to show there is culturally, Yet state policy widespread support among makers and agricultural of. Vermonters to preserve ficials are moving much to farmland and keep our far- slow towards preserving land mers in business. (please turn to page 3) an Excellent to belptownofficiaisprepare animation at Thetford schools town reports informative town reports that Film 1 as Out-help the taxpayer make r in Vet- knowledgeable decisions !ield Town, about the operation of town responded to the alarm. The fire is under investigation within the Bradford Fire Department. The structure is located just off Mink Hill Road in Bradford and is owned by Helen Wflliamson. THETFORD--"This is fun!" was a common remark during