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December 2, 1981     Journal Opinion
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December 2, 1981
 

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Page @The Journal Opinlon-December 2, 1981 t THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. " Publisher of Journal / Opinion Wookly mlml iMIokd b Irodfd, Vomno. Seburlpb too Vormit ud New Nempsldre - St.00 pot yw; $i.Se fer sx ; 4wt 4f  - $I.N Ir yINer 4uld $7J0 fl six mHtbs; hNi cltin 4kmwnt St.O0. Seogld chess pestle paid el Ilmdferd, Vermemt 0$0|3. Peblisbed by Noreost Pvbliskiq Comply, Inc., P.0. lies 378, |mdfsnl. Robert F. Humlnski President & Publisher ,..O 4 Bradford /   Woodsville -2-51  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper " i i i i i iii --= = Letters to the Editor Vermont celebration of Children and Youth To the Editor: I am writing this letter in support of the Vermont Celebration of Children and Youth. The White House Conference on Children and Youth has been decentralized and these conferences will occur in each individual state. In Vermont, there is a three part plan. The bulk of the funding is being used to help sponsor regional cdlebrations of children and youth with activities for the whole family, activities that promote positive parenting, and others that promote health, physical fitness and good nutrition. Governor Snelling has declared the week of Nov. 29 - Dec. 5, an official week to honor the children and youth in Vermont. December 5th is the official Children and Youth day. We read so much about juvenile criminals, and social problems of which children are either victims or causitive agents. These are a small fraction of children and youth in our state. On Dec. 5th there will be eight celebrations to honor children and youth around the state. The reason we are having these celebrations is to recognize children, and to recognize our responsibilities as parents. Many areas will have parenting workshops, health screenings, balloons, en- tertainment, craft making, family swims and skates, and other activities to strengthen families and honor our children. I hope that everyone is able to contribute to the celebrations in some way and , , ,, ,,,,,,,,, , I Editorial 1 Newsolution toan oldproblem TotheEdltor: effective solution to the ......  On 11 November the Union nuclear war problem. Simply of Concerned Scientists sponsored convocations on many college campuses to publicize the dangers of nuclear war. Literature I picked up at Harvard and MIT urged all countries, especially the US and USSR, to stop the arms buildup and reduce their inventory of nuclear weapons. I think every person of perception and intelligence will agree this is the most logical way to prevent a nuclear conflict. Unfor- tonately national leaders do. not always act in so reasonable a manner. It is conceivable.that two adversaries could follow-a predetermined course of action on a long-term basis; but, as the number of par- ticipants increase, the probability of all staying on the chosen path rapidly ap- proaches zero. Just one of a proliferating number of nations with the nuclear capability can easily throw sand into any arms reduction plans agreed upon by the two superpowers. If this happens Armageddon will be upon us. I qualified as chief engineer on a nuclear powered sub- marine, was a startup specialist at three commercial nuclear power plants, am the author of the worst-selling hook in 1981 (J. J.'S BLUFF or The Theory of Business Relativity), and I have a more Left behind assume the worst-case situation will happen and then use proven technologies from submarines, nuclear power plants, and the space program to he prepared for it. Off-the-shelf designs and manufacturing capability already exist to build a con- tainment complex in each local community of the United States such that the entire population can survive an unlimited nuclear war. Sur- vival system units could be designed for an initial capacity of twenty thousand people with a stretch capability to thirty thousand. It would take, as an order-of- magnitude estimate, one On Monday, Nov. 16, Massachusetts passed a bottle bill leaving New Hampshire literally surrounded by states that already require returnable bottles. Other New England states have gone to a system of returnable bottles for a variety of sensible reasons, but they have stayed with the system for one obvious reason: because it works. Returnable bottles save on money in the long run, according to govern- ment studies. More importantly, throw-away bottles represent a throw-away society in which waste is condoned and taken for granted even in the face of a better alternative. Many retailers in New Hampshire are finding themselves stocking both returnable and non-returnable bottles to accommodate both in-state and out- of-state business. This adds to the distributor's" operating costs. New Hampshire Rep. Mary P, Chambers has said recently that the distributors, who have traditionally opposed bottle legislation, now are ready to support a bottle bill in New Hampshire. It appears that it is unlikely that the New Hampshire legislature will pass any similar bottle bill this year, hut it is likely that the bill may be rein- trnduced in the state next year. Support of a bottle bill is not as politically crippling as many New Hampshire politicians may think and apparently Massachusetts legislators have come to believe this is so. The Massachusetts bill was finalized by overriding the governor's veto of the bill by a 29 to 10 vote. But, between now and the next legislative session, there is a state election that may .stand in the way of a rational returnable bottle policy in New Hampshire. Politicians rarely make ideological turn-arounds in an election year. Let us hope that next year can be different, Ben Thresher's mill almost any kind of oldor modern implements or fur- niture, but this summer he has spent a lot of his time con- structing the carriage for a brand-new full-sized cannon, for a hobbyist in Denver. About two years ago, Ben sold his mill to the Woodstock Foundation, a Rockefeller- hacked organization which is establishing a museum in Woodstock, Vermont. The Foundation originally planned to build an identical mill in Woodstock, then move the machinery of the Thresher Mill down there. However, it could never be quite the same as the mellow old mill is now, with its worn old floors and its accumulation of shavings and cobwebs, and there are many who feel that the mill should stay just as it is. The Wood- stock Foundation people may decide the same thing, and help to keep the mill preserved and in operation, right here where it has been running for 133 years. In the meantime, the Foundation has sponsored the production by John Emrol of i Orford of two documentary television films showing Ben Ther at work in the mill, the first one of him con- structing a wooden water tub, the second showing the entire process of making a wooden sled, from cutting the trees way through to the time the sled was put into use. The logistics of shooting the film in the old shop were rather in- volved, such as getting the proper lighting into the place by covering all the windows with pink-tinted plastic sheets so that the daylight would combine properly with the artificial light. A separate electric line had to be run into the mill from the nearby utility pole transformer. The qttend them. Children in elementary and high schools are being asked to write their opinions about families and parenting and submit these to Governor Snelling. Some of these letters may be published in local newspapers and should give Vermonters a feel for what our children and young people are thinking. Look for the Vermont Celebration of Children and Youth posters in your area to find out more about the local celebration in your area. Claudia Jacobs White House Conference on Children and Youth contact person in Vermont, c-o Social Services, 103 So. Main St., Waterbury, Vermont hundred million dollars to develop a prototype and one hundred billion dollars to build the standard design at ten thousand places throughout the country. The Hide Foundation was incorporated so as to bring this solution into public awareness. Its immediate goal is to place newsletters in each of the above ten thousand locations Members are needed to set-up this distribution system. More information can be obtained by sending a self-addressed, stamped return envelope to: The Hide Foundation, P. O. Box 72, Bath, Maine 04530. Leon Nelhonse, President The Hide Foundation Bath, Maine Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton District citizens appointed On the Stevens River in Barnet Center (on the road to West Barnet) is another water-powered mill, operated by Ben Thresher. There was an up-and-down sawmill on this site sometime be[ore 1836, then the present mill was built in 1848 by Alexander Jack, who used it as a steam dye works for tanning and dying sheepskins for carriage robes and parlor rugs. He later manufactured hydraulic extractors and did other machine work. At one time Someone also used to make feather dusters here. Ben Thresher has worked here since 1941, then he bought the mill in 1947. He does custom woodworking and metalworking -- such as converting an old pitchfork into a "soddifter" for the local grave-digger -- and Charges next-to-nothing for his time, besides dispensing a liberal amount of homespun philosophy along with the job. Ben is pretty easy-gning, and although he can do most anything, he does it at his own pace, without much concern for deadlines. Like the Garland Mill, Thresher's Mill runs by a turbine. The millpond has a 16- foot plank dam, some of the planks being over 100 years old, The waterpower runs a drill press, trip hammer, horizontal boring machine, lathe, threader, emery wheel, and various saws. The turbine can generate almost  hor- sepower, but when the water gets ton low, Ben can shift to the power4akeoff of his Jeep or to electricity. Part of the mill is set up as a blacksmith shop. Ben has been described as a blaith, carpenter, cidermaker, sawyer, wheelwright, machinist, ax- rieieinder and welder -- besides ng an example of Six District One citizens were nominated for high State positions at the Nov. 25th Council Meeting. Lyle Hersom of Groveton to the State Liquor Commission, James Wemyss of Groveton and Milo Pike of Laconia to the Industrial Development Authority, Frederick Marrigan of Colebrook to the Justice of the Colebrook District Court, and Lawrence Miller of Errol to the Special Justice of the Colebrook District Court. Robert Bodwe]l of Sanbornton, Kenneth Ryan of Lebanon and Kendall Norcott of Gorham were confirmed to several boards and Com- missions. I take much pride in seeing many citizens from our district involved in State Government and will continue to seek out people who are truly interested in making a positive contribution to our state. If anyone is interested in serving on a state board or commission please con- tact me by sending your resume and some general area of interests. Other items passed at the meeting in- cluded over 2 million dollars for low in- come energy assistance with over 1 million coming to district one fgr assistance to those in need during the winter months. Individuals interested in obtaining in- formation should call toll free 1-800-852- 3311 or 1-800-552-4617. Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Council in Lebanon received by state contract $10,050 for regional planning assistance. BRADFORD PLANNING BOARD BRADFORD--The Bradford Planning Board will meet at a special meeting on Thursday, Dec. 3 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bradford Academy Con- ference Room. Selectmen and trustees are invited. Exchange student writes home To the Editor: Well, I'm finally on my two week exchange to Warialda. I took the train from Toukley, a very long ride from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. I read two books and slept a little. From the moment I step off the train, I fell in love with this place. How I miss the coun- tryside! It will be good to get back to Vermont. My host family, the Bowers, are great people. Dad is quiet with a good sense of humor. Mom is heaps of fun and cooks great meals. I have four sisters and no brothers. The years old. Then comes Sarah, 13, Meredith (Meri) 16, and Megan, 17. Nana also lives with us. Da (Grandad) died in July. Nana is always pert and full of life. She makes sur we get our cup of tea and are happy. I love the farm we live on. The Bowers own 3800 acres! They have about 2000 sheep, a couple hundred cattle, about 9 horses and as many cats if not more. Can you imagine owning all of that? It doesn't seem as if they do because yJu can see only a couple of cattle Note: Confirmed dates for showin of "Ben's Mill" on the Odysse series are as follows: Vt. ETV - Tuesday; Dec. 8, - 9 PM; N.H. Public TV- Sunday, Dec. 13 - 8 PM and Saturday Dec. 19 - 3:30 PM youngest is Rowena (Ro), 11 here and there, the sheep are in the far paddocks. I haven't been on a tour of the Ilace yet. Meri and I were going out on horses during the weekend, but it was raising so we'll go next weekend. Our house is a nice cozy farmhouse and we drink fresh cows milk. It takes about 30- 45 minutes to get to school. Morn drives us from the house to the road to catch the bus. The school here is really small, 300 kids from 7th to 12th grades. The teachers are very friendly with the students. At the 6th form farewell (graduation party), we all had fun dancing together. It is now Monday. On the weekend we did lots of things. Dad, Ro, Sara and I went around in the Toyota jeep and looked at all of the paddocks. It is so beautiful to see acres and acres of wheat or just green grass. Dad told and showed me the difference between wheat, barley and wild oats, when you plant them, sow them etc. He had just planted sorghum so it hadn't come through the ground yet. It was really in- teresting. I loved riding along the rough ground looking at everything. When we were in one of the higher paddocks, Dad saw some car tracks on one of the lower paddocks. Apparently, he's had some trouble with people killing his sheep. We went to the lower paddock and there were the tracks with three pools of blood where the sheep were killed. You could see where the people rounded them up, too. He had a good idea who killed them, but unfortunately there's no way to prove it. Yesterday we went to church. The whole church was about as big as our kitchen. It was the typical country church. There were only 11 people there, 8 Bowers and 3 other friends. It seemed strange with so few people. Mter church, we came home and dropped Megan and Meri off so they could study for exams. The rest of us went to a farm for lunch with other neighbors. We had a nice cold lunch and sweets, then went for a look around the pad- docks. There was a young bloke there, about 21 or 22, whose name was Randall. He was very nice and we had a long talk. When we were leaving, the host asked me if I was looking for a rich farmer. I said "yes." He pointed to Randall, said he was prac- tically a millionaire! I told him I'd be back in four years time to marry him! (Can I pick them or can't I?) When we got home, Dad and I went for another drive to see what we hadn't seen on Saturday. Then we rounded up the cattle for milking. Dad asked me ff I could drive 4-on- the-floor and I said yes, so he told me to drive the jeep back to the house while he walked in the cattle. Believe me, I didn't mind. After almost a year without driving, I still hadn't (please turn to page 5) BEN THRESHER'S MILL movies will be eventually be shown at the Foundation's museum in Woodstock, and the first one has already been on television. Parts of the movies will be featured in the Educational TV series " sse " Ody y , scheduled for December 8, 1981, and perhaps repeated at later. dates. Also, organizations may be able to make : arrangements with John Karol for showings of the movies. An increase in the consultant summit snowmaking $389,013.50 for bridge widening Route 112 over Lost River and Smith in Woodstock, $89,750.00 for elevator in the Sherman Adams on Mr. Washington N.H., and the sale of an obsolete Effingham rounded out the Public The Governor's Council also the contract with the Wolfeboro the Aged Inc., of $82,252.00 which ' social services support to the housing demonstration project the Farmer's Home Adrr the Administration on the Aging. Also approved was N.H. the Arts grants to The Lafa Council in Franconia, Ply the Arts, Plymouth, N.H. Center Harbor, N.H. Youth Concord. The Governor and Council also the contract for a Federal Preservation Fund Grant in Aid Canaan Town Library, in Canaan, The Next Governor & Council will be Dec. 10th. Everyone is attend any of our meetings. December meeting will he Dec. State House. It is a pleasure and service this district as Councilor! i iili!  Michel Chalufour with TV camera and John Karol with mike, making movl of Ben Thresher bildl,g a wooden sled. Our Northeast and acid by ROBERT A. MiCHENFELDER Reed talk about acid rain. The occasion was Country Resource Conservation and annual dinner meeting. Frank is a biologist who the University of Vermont and the Vermont Royalton. Between times he monitors rain test devices on Camel's Hump western (weather) slopes have been under years. " - Today's mail brought a flier from Gregg -- subject -- The Clean Air Act and rain. I mention the two events because of the lebate on the Act, due to be overhauled and !s probabl, one of the most important, frmtrating issues confronting the 97th Congress; because it is the "country's most important (Gregg) and may well determine who will live die: controversial because like most legislation it I on all sides and the Administration wants many dards relaxed: and frustrating, at least for the because the final shape of the act will he based rather than scientific or technical decisions theast just doesn't have the clout to seriously outcome. To get back to acid rain, there are several "mark-up" stage in the committees that of Senator George Mitchell (ME), Deposition Control Act" is typical and Senator Moynihan (IVY), proposes Senator Dodd (CT) focusses on revisions Implementation Plans. Unfortunately, the states produce little acid pollutant and about what is done by its neighbors to the west. In the House the Moffett-Gregg bill is almost the Mitchell Senate bill. HR 4816, Norman rather comprehensive and will have to be sidered along with the Moffett-Gregg. A Congressman Gregg would speed up reports by investigators. In the meantime, the Administration, through proposing substantial increases in the amount dioxide (SO2) that coal-fired plants may emit, the burning of high sulphur coal in the Ohio proposes greater increases in the levels of (NOx) emission from automotive sources to tak{ heat off Detroit and $40-$60 per car. Cone doubts that figure will everi the sticker price). While all this sounds encouraging, hear in average acid precipitate in New England is percent NOx and 60 percent SO2, so vehicles and hundreds of smoke stacks. sibility and then assigning it will give since in our judicial system, cause and eontrovertibly linked. Here the sublety of process becomes painfully apparent. Frank Reed and his associates know that decade, at altitudes above 2000 feet grow, now new seedlings have appeared red spruce have no more than half their normal of needles. Why? One fact: aluminum normal compound forms and not ordinarily dissolved by high acid levels in the soil and is l shows up in plant tissue in heavy blocking the ducts by which nutrients are cause of plant mortaliq Another fact; soil bacteria, necessary to detritus on the forest floor (leaves, disappearing. Result, the litter depths are stuff doesn't rot, humuS is not being formed; not being released. Plant starvation is would not stand a routine judicial test. And another: bacteria found on there to break down soil chemic readily absorb. These forms are Suspect; acid rain. Proof; not yet, but for the dying spruce, the missing! seedlingS, needles. No other likel The ecological system in our upper highest acid levels are measured) are dramatically, but at a rate far in excess of cha a changing world. How far will it have to vious enough for our courts, our legislatureS, community to face up to the avoided, perhaps deliberation is a virtue. reaching the point of no return with "all So what to do? Short of insurrection, all (indeed urge) is that you write to delegation (Senator Stafford, as committee the list) and encourage Moffett-Gregg bills. Senator Stafford is quick public support for the Clean Air Act (in s the contrary) seems to have been shot down of the Administration and Industry lobbyists. It should bother you. Page @The Journal Opinlon-December 2, 1981 t THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. " Publisher of Journal / Opinion Wookly mlml iMIokd b Irodfd, Vomno. Seburlpb too Vormit ud New Nempsldre - St.00 pot yw; $i.Se fer sx ; 4wt 4f  - $I.N Ir yINer 4uld $7J0 fl six mHtbs; hNi cltin 4kmwnt St.O0. Seogld chess pestle paid el Ilmdferd, Vermemt 0$0|3. Peblisbed by Noreost Pvbliskiq Comply, Inc., P.0. lies 378, |mdfsnl. Robert F. Humlnski President & Publisher ,..O 4 Bradford /   Woodsville -2-51  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper " i i i i i iii --= = Letters to the Editor Vermont celebration of Children and Youth To the Editor: I am writing this letter in support of the Vermont Celebration of Children and Youth. The White House Conference on Children and Youth has been decentralized and these conferences will occur in each individual state. In Vermont, there is a three part plan. The bulk of the funding is being used to help sponsor regional cdlebrations of children and youth with activities for the whole family, activities that promote positive parenting, and others that promote health, physical fitness and good nutrition. Governor Snelling has declared the week of Nov. 29 - Dec. 5, an official week to honor the children and youth in Vermont. December 5th is the official Children and Youth day. We read so much about juvenile criminals, and social problems of which children are either victims or causitive agents. These are a small fraction of children and youth in our state. On Dec. 5th there will be eight celebrations to honor children and youth around the state. The reason we are having these celebrations is to recognize children, and to recognize our responsibilities as parents. Many areas will have parenting workshops, health screenings, balloons, en- tertainment, craft making, family swims and skates, and other activities to strengthen families and honor our children. I hope that everyone is able to contribute to the celebrations in some way and , , ,, ,,,,,,,,, , I Editorial 1 Newsolution toan oldproblem TotheEdltor: effective solution to the ......  On 11 November the Union nuclear war problem. Simply of Concerned Scientists sponsored convocations on many college campuses to publicize the dangers of nuclear war. Literature I picked up at Harvard and MIT urged all countries, especially the US and USSR, to stop the arms buildup and reduce their inventory of nuclear weapons. I think every person of perception and intelligence will agree this is the most logical way to prevent a nuclear conflict. Unfor- tonately national leaders do. not always act in so reasonable a manner. It is conceivable.that two adversaries could follow-a predetermined course of action on a long-term basis; but, as the number of par- ticipants increase, the probability of all staying on the chosen path rapidly ap- proaches zero. Just one of a proliferating number of nations with the nuclear capability can easily throw sand into any arms reduction plans agreed upon by the two superpowers. If this happens Armageddon will be upon us. I qualified as chief engineer on a nuclear powered sub- marine, was a startup specialist at three commercial nuclear power plants, am the author of the worst-selling hook in 1981 (J. J.'S BLUFF or The Theory of Business Relativity), and I have a more Left behind assume the worst-case situation will happen and then use proven technologies from submarines, nuclear power plants, and the space program to he prepared for it. Off-the-shelf designs and manufacturing capability already exist to build a con- tainment complex in each local community of the United States such that the entire population can survive an unlimited nuclear war. Sur- vival system units could be designed for an initial capacity of twenty thousand people with a stretch capability to thirty thousand. It would take, as an order-of- magnitude estimate, one On Monday, Nov. 16, Massachusetts passed a bottle bill leaving New Hampshire literally surrounded by states that already require returnable bottles. Other New England states have gone to a system of returnable bottles for a variety of sensible reasons, but they have stayed with the system for one obvious reason: because it works. Returnable bottles save on money in the long run, according to govern- ment studies. More importantly, throw-away bottles represent a throw-away society in which waste is condoned and taken for granted even in the face of a better alternative. Many retailers in New Hampshire are finding themselves stocking both returnable and non-returnable bottles to accommodate both in-state and out- of-state business. This adds to the distributor's" operating costs. New Hampshire Rep. Mary P, Chambers has said recently that the distributors, who have traditionally opposed bottle legislation, now are ready to support a bottle bill in New Hampshire. It appears that it is unlikely that the New Hampshire legislature will pass any similar bottle bill this year, hut it is likely that the bill may be rein- trnduced in the state next year. Support of a bottle bill is not as politically crippling as many New Hampshire politicians may think and apparently Massachusetts legislators have come to believe this is so. The Massachusetts bill was finalized by overriding the governor's veto of the bill by a 29 to 10 vote. But, between now and the next legislative session, there is a state election that may .stand in the way of a rational returnable bottle policy in New Hampshire. Politicians rarely make ideological turn-arounds in an election year. Let us hope that next year can be different, Ben Thresher's mill almost any kind of oldor modern implements or fur- niture, but this summer he has spent a lot of his time con- structing the carriage for a brand-new full-sized cannon, for a hobbyist in Denver. About two years ago, Ben sold his mill to the Woodstock Foundation, a Rockefeller- hacked organization which is establishing a museum in Woodstock, Vermont. The Foundation originally planned to build an identical mill in Woodstock, then move the machinery of the Thresher Mill down there. However, it could never be quite the same as the mellow old mill is now, with its worn old floors and its accumulation of shavings and cobwebs, and there are many who feel that the mill should stay just as it is. The Wood- stock Foundation people may decide the same thing, and help to keep the mill preserved and in operation, right here where it has been running for 133 years. In the meantime, the Foundation has sponsored the production by John Emrol of i Orford of two documentary television films showing Ben Ther at work in the mill, the first one of him con- structing a wooden water tub, the second showing the entire process of making a wooden sled, from cutting the trees way through to the time the sled was put into use. The logistics of shooting the film in the old shop were rather in- volved, such as getting the proper lighting into the place by covering all the windows with pink-tinted plastic sheets so that the daylight would combine properly with the artificial light. A separate electric line had to be run into the mill from the nearby utility pole transformer. The qttend them. Children in elementary and high schools are being asked to write their opinions about families and parenting and submit these to Governor Snelling. Some of these letters may be published in local newspapers and should give Vermonters a feel for what our children and young people are thinking. Look for the Vermont Celebration of Children and Youth posters in your area to find out more about the local celebration in your area. Claudia Jacobs White House Conference on Children and Youth contact person in Vermont, c-o Social Services, 103 So. Main St., Waterbury, Vermont hundred million dollars to develop a prototype and one hundred billion dollars to build the standard design at ten thousand places throughout the country. The Hide Foundation was incorporated so as to bring this solution into public awareness. Its immediate goal is to place newsletters in each of the above ten thousand locations Members are needed to set-up this distribution system. More information can be obtained by sending a self-addressed, stamped return envelope to: The Hide Foundation, P. O. Box 72, Bath, Maine 04530. Leon Nelhonse, President The Hide Foundation Bath, Maine Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton District citizens appointed On the Stevens River in Barnet Center (on the road to West Barnet) is another water-powered mill, operated by Ben Thresher. There was an up-and-down sawmill on this site sometime be[ore 1836, then the present mill was built in 1848 by Alexander Jack, who used it as a steam dye works for tanning and dying sheepskins for carriage robes and parlor rugs. He later manufactured hydraulic extractors and did other machine work. At one time Someone also used to make feather dusters here. Ben Thresher has worked here since 1941, then he bought the mill in 1947. He does custom woodworking and metalworking -- such as converting an old pitchfork into a "soddifter" for the local grave-digger -- and Charges next-to-nothing for his time, besides dispensing a liberal amount of homespun philosophy along with the job. Ben is pretty easy-gning, and although he can do most anything, he does it at his own pace, without much concern for deadlines. Like the Garland Mill, Thresher's Mill runs by a turbine. The millpond has a 16- foot plank dam, some of the planks being over 100 years old, The waterpower runs a drill press, trip hammer, horizontal boring machine, lathe, threader, emery wheel, and various saws. The turbine can generate almost  hor- sepower, but when the water gets ton low, Ben can shift to the power4akeoff of his Jeep or to electricity. Part of the mill is set up as a blacksmith shop. Ben has been described as a blaith, carpenter, cidermaker, sawyer, wheelwright, machinist, ax- rieieinder and welder -- besides ng an example of Six District One citizens were nominated for high State positions at the Nov. 25th Council Meeting. Lyle Hersom of Groveton to the State Liquor Commission, James Wemyss of Groveton and Milo Pike of Laconia to the Industrial Development Authority, Frederick Marrigan of Colebrook to the Justice of the Colebrook District Court, and Lawrence Miller of Errol to the Special Justice of the Colebrook District Court. Robert Bodwe]l of Sanbornton, Kenneth Ryan of Lebanon and Kendall Norcott of Gorham were confirmed to several boards and Com- missions. I take much pride in seeing many citizens from our district involved in State Government and will continue to seek out people who are truly interested in making a positive contribution to our state. If anyone is interested in serving on a state board or commission please con- tact me by sending your resume and some general area of interests. Other items passed at the meeting in- cluded over 2 million dollars for low in- come energy assistance with over 1 million coming to district one fgr assistance to those in need during the winter months. Individuals interested in obtaining in- formation should call toll free 1-800-852- 3311 or 1-800-552-4617. Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Council in Lebanon received by state contract $10,050 for regional planning assistance. BRADFORD PLANNING BOARD BRADFORD--The Bradford Planning Board will meet at a special meeting on Thursday, Dec. 3 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bradford Academy Con- ference Room. Selectmen and trustees are invited. Exchange student writes home To the Editor: Well, I'm finally on my two week exchange to Warialda. I took the train from Toukley, a very long ride from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. I read two books and slept a little. From the moment I step off the train, I fell in love with this place. How I miss the coun- tryside! It will be good to get back to Vermont. My host family, the Bowers, are great people. Dad is quiet with a good sense of humor. Mom is heaps of fun and cooks great meals. I have four sisters and no brothers. The years old. Then comes Sarah, 13, Meredith (Meri) 16, and Megan, 17. Nana also lives with us. Da (Grandad) died in July. Nana is always pert and full of life. She makes sur we get our cup of tea and are happy. I love the farm we live on. The Bowers own 3800 acres! They have about 2000 sheep, a couple hundred cattle, about 9 horses and as many cats if not more. Can you imagine owning all of that? It doesn't seem as if they do because yJu can see only a couple of cattle Note: Confirmed dates for showin of "Ben's Mill" on the Odysse series are as follows: Vt. ETV - Tuesday; Dec. 8, - 9 PM; N.H. Public TV- Sunday, Dec. 13 - 8 PM and Saturday Dec. 19 - 3:30 PM youngest is Rowena (Ro), 11 here and there, the sheep are in the far paddocks. I haven't been on a tour of the Ilace yet. Meri and I were going out on horses during the weekend, but it was raising so we'll go next weekend. Our house is a nice cozy farmhouse and we drink fresh cows milk. It takes about 30- 45 minutes to get to school. Morn drives us from the house to the road to catch the bus. The school here is really small, 300 kids from 7th to 12th grades. The teachers are very friendly with the students. At the 6th form farewell (graduation party), we all had fun dancing together. It is now Monday. On the weekend we did lots of things. Dad, Ro, Sara and I went around in the Toyota jeep and looked at all of the paddocks. It is so beautiful to see acres and acres of wheat or just green grass. Dad told and showed me the difference between wheat, barley and wild oats, when you plant them, sow them etc. He had just planted sorghum so it hadn't come through the ground yet. It was really in- teresting. I loved riding along the rough ground looking at everything. When we were in one of the higher paddocks, Dad saw some car tracks on one of the lower paddocks. Apparently, he's had some trouble with people killing his sheep. We went to the lower paddock and there were the tracks with three pools of blood where the sheep were killed. You could see where the people rounded them up, too. He had a good idea who killed them, but unfortunately there's no way to prove it. Yesterday we went to church. The whole church was about as big as our kitchen. It was the typical country church. There were only 11 people there, 8 Bowers and 3 other friends. It seemed strange with so few people. Mter church, we came home and dropped Megan and Meri off so they could study for exams. The rest of us went to a farm for lunch with other neighbors. We had a nice cold lunch and sweets, then went for a look around the pad- docks. There was a young bloke there, about 21 or 22, whose name was Randall. He was very nice and we had a long talk. When we were leaving, the host asked me if I was looking for a rich farmer. I said "yes." He pointed to Randall, said he was prac- tically a millionaire! I told him I'd be back in four years time to marry him! (Can I pick them or can't I?) When we got home, Dad and I went for another drive to see what we hadn't seen on Saturday. Then we rounded up the cattle for milking. Dad asked me ff I could drive 4-on- the-floor and I said yes, so he told me to drive the jeep back to the house while he walked in the cattle. Believe me, I didn't mind. After almost a year without driving, I still hadn't (please turn to page 5) BEN THRESHER'S MILL movies will be eventually be shown at the Foundation's museum in Woodstock, and the first one has already been on television. Parts of the movies will be featured in the Educational TV series " sse " Ody y , scheduled for December 8, 1981, and perhaps repeated at later. dates. Also, organizations may be able to make : arrangements with John Karol for showings of the movies. An increase in the consultant summit snowmaking $389,013.50 for bridge widening Route 112 over Lost River and Smith in Woodstock, $89,750.00 for elevator in the Sherman Adams on Mr. Washington N.H., and the sale of an obsolete Effingham rounded out the Public The Governor's Council also the contract with the Wolfeboro the Aged Inc., of $82,252.00 which ' social services support to the housing demonstration project the Farmer's Home Adrr the Administration on the Aging. Also approved was N.H. the Arts grants to The Lafa Council in Franconia, Ply the Arts, Plymouth, N.H. Center Harbor, N.H. Youth Concord. The Governor and Council also the contract for a Federal Preservation Fund Grant in Aid Canaan Town Library, in Canaan, The Next Governor & Council will be Dec. 10th. Everyone is attend any of our meetings. December meeting will he Dec. State House. It is a pleasure and service this district as Councilor! i iili!  Michel Chalufour with TV camera and John Karol with mike, making movl of Ben Thresher bildl,g a wooden sled. Our Northeast and acid by ROBERT A. MiCHENFELDER Reed talk about acid rain. The occasion was Country Resource Conservation and annual dinner meeting. Frank is a biologist who the University of Vermont and the Vermont Royalton. Between times he monitors rain test devices on Camel's Hump western (weather) slopes have been under years. " - Today's mail brought a flier from Gregg -- subject -- The Clean Air Act and rain. I mention the two events because of the lebate on the Act, due to be overhauled and !s probabl, one of the most important, frmtrating issues confronting the 97th Congress; because it is the "country's most important (Gregg) and may well determine who will live die: controversial because like most legislation it I on all sides and the Administration wants many dards relaxed: and frustrating, at least for the because the final shape of the act will he based rather than scientific or technical decisions theast just doesn't have the clout to seriously outcome. To get back to acid rain, there are several "mark-up" stage in the committees that of Senator George Mitchell (ME), Deposition Control Act" is typical and Senator Moynihan (IVY), proposes Senator Dodd (CT) focusses on revisions Implementation Plans. Unfortunately, the states produce little acid pollutant and about what is done by its neighbors to the west. In the House the Moffett-Gregg bill is almost the Mitchell Senate bill. HR 4816, Norman rather comprehensive and will have to be sidered along with the Moffett-Gregg. A Congressman Gregg would speed up reports by investigators. In the meantime, the Administration, through proposing substantial increases in the amount dioxide (SO2) that coal-fired plants may emit, the burning of high sulphur coal in the Ohio proposes greater increases in the levels of (NOx) emission from automotive sources to tak{ heat off Detroit and $40-$60 per car. Cone doubts that figure will everi the sticker price). While all this sounds encouraging, hear in average acid precipitate in New England is percent NOx and 60 percent SO2, so vehicles and hundreds of smoke stacks. sibility and then assigning it will give since in our judicial system, cause and eontrovertibly linked. Here the sublety of process becomes painfully apparent. Frank Reed and his associates know that decade, at altitudes above 2000 feet grow, now new seedlings have appeared red spruce have no more than half their normal of needles. Why? One fact: aluminum normal compound forms and not ordinarily dissolved by high acid levels in the soil and is l shows up in plant tissue in heavy blocking the ducts by which nutrients are cause of plant mortaliq Another fact; soil bacteria, necessary to detritus on the forest floor (leaves, disappearing. Result, the litter depths are stuff doesn't rot, humuS is not being formed; not being released. Plant starvation is would not stand a routine judicial test. And another: bacteria found on there to break down soil chemic readily absorb. These forms are Suspect; acid rain. Proof; not yet, but for the dying spruce, the missing! seedlingS, needles. No other likel The ecological system in our upper highest acid levels are measured) are dramatically, but at a rate far in excess of cha a changing world. How far will it have to vious enough for our courts, our legislatureS, community to face up to the avoided, perhaps deliberation is a virtue. reaching the point of no return with "all So what to do? Short of insurrection, all (indeed urge) is that you write to delegation (Senator Stafford, as committee the list) and encourage Moffett-Gregg bills. Senator Stafford is quick public support for the Clean Air Act (in s the contrary) seems to have been shot down of the Administration and Industry lobbyists. It should bother you.