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December 2, 1981     Journal Opinion
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December 2, 1981
 

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December 2, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 must be deterred Gregg looks at crime in U.S. Survey conducted by the to our economic Bureau of Justice Statistics is a topic of said nearly one of every three concern for households in the United throughout the States was directly affected to almost by some kind of serious crime public opinion last year. The FBI's Uniform Crime Report says the chance National Crime of being a victim of crime has grateful for the of the town Underhill last Fellowship the home of Mrs. Dec. 9th with Underhill and Putnam as co- are proud of who came in National Track last week. Keene, which he the 10th place leolleges. of hook awards in contest the library are: What I Think of it reminds me "and 4th grades -- 5th and 6th Dawn Stygles. and 2nd grades - 2nd Shane The winning collages are on library. They While there some craft different Craft are available for as well as the in the We know who is chair from and directions Wife. A complete )edia of 25 can also The staff are all willing to help of designs or execution. evening concert on his Estey he brought a rare treat. He construction of which he had tiny reeds, stops" which =is like even base viol, He out of town funeral service Goodwin last service for of W. Rumney, at 2:00 p.m. Chapel. , at the in White Friday after a two him at then played music from Handel, including "Water Music". Bach and Beethoven were beautifully performed, often giving the impression of full orchestra. Some ragtime followed by some requests and hymns sung by the audience completed the delightful evening. To some it recalled singing around the organ in earlier years and to others the time when a little boy pumped the church organ. Refresh- ments were served with an opportunity to talk with Bruce and see the organ at close range. A family gathering for Thanksgiving at the home of Mrs. Stephen Underhill in- cluded her sister, Mrs. Hazel Underhill from Marie's Nursing Home in Orford; Miriam - the Nortons and John's family from New Hampshire; and Buddy and family from Connecticut. The Lawrence Underhill fulfilled a long-time dream of spending the holiday quietly at their camp. We are proud of Mary Jane Hood, the only Piermont student to make a high school honor roll, -- Oxbow. The Floyd Smith family celebrated their first Thanksgiving in their new home with 18 members of the family present, ranging in age from Mrs. George Webster who is 90 to Eric Smith, age 4. Also spending their first Thanksgiving in their new home were the Smith-Evans family. Houses through the village were empty as Mrs. Clement Kinghorn spent the holiday with her son, Guy and family in Saxton's River, the James family had dinner in Glen- cliffe with Mr. and Mrs. Dale Knapp and family and Robert Evans and Mrs., Eugene Robbins celebrated at the home of the Arnold Shields. Floyd R. Ray 764-9979 the Parsonage. Church Sale Don't forget the Methodist Christmas Sale Friday, Dec. 4th at the Town Hall. Have a Happy Thanksgiving, you deserve it, then make someone else happy. Mrs. Doris Ball will not be in the town office this week as she will be enjoying a trip to Florida with relatives. !: PUBLIC NOTICE "Crime Index Offense" every two seconds (refer to Crime Clock Chart). Under present Federal Criminal Codes, only five percent of the street crimes fall under federal jurisdiction. However, despite this limited jurisdiction, there is a great deal that the federal gover- nment can do to holster anti- crime efforts by working with state and local authorities. Attorney General William French Smith recently released a report compiled by a special Administration Task Force on Violent Crime. These recommendations form the basis for legislative action to help stem the tide of violent crime. Sentencing Reforms The Task Force recom- mends abolishing parole at the federal level and substituting tripled since1960, awaiting sentencing or the According to the FBI, a outcome of an appcal. violent crime such as murder, Insanity Pleas forceable rape, robbery or Juries should be allowed to aggravated assault occurs find defendants "guilty but every 24 seconds. Property mentally ill," so that a crimes such as burglary, mentally ill defendant could larceny-theft or motor vehicle remain in custody even if theft occur eery three technically cleared of seconds. This translates into a responsibility of a crime. Narcotics Under this plan, we would see tougher enforcement of drug laws by beefing-up border patrols; increasing domestic enforcement; responsible use of herbicides to destroy drug crops; and increased military assistance in detecting air and sea drug traffic. Crime Watch Citizens would be en- couraged to take an active role in the deterrence of local neighborhood crime. Under this program community residents would he called upon to organize evening crime watch programs, and schedule meetings for dissemination of crime defense information. These are only some of the Administration's Crime Task Force recommendations for CRIME M&o%. off@ every 3 mlnulios every 6 minutes eve./ om, o AGGRAVATED ASSAULT every 4e ,ecoe, / %/ sets VIOI.ENT CRIME every 24 eeconde \\; / .... N CRIME INDEX OFFENBIE every :t seconds LT. GENERAL SPEAKS IN VERMONT-- Lt. General La Verne E. Weber, chief at the National Guard Bureau at the Pentagon, spoke recently to the Ethan Allen Chapter of The Association of the United States Army. In his address, Weber stressed the role of today's National Guard in our nation's defense, CLOCK State Police patrols will increase for the holidays PROPERTY CRIME ever/$oMe A # % LARCENY.THEFT BURGLARY 4 soconcle one MOTOR YEHiCLE THEFT every :tO eocoe,de Sem:.CnmolmlkeUelmdimjee. rib. :me,, 10 0el a system of modest good- both legislative and cam- behavior credits which would mnnity action to help stem be used to earn early parole, increases in crime. There is no Sentencing. , uder. this reasen that cities, and proviSion would '! for a rural areas of this country specific number of years should be plagued with rather than a 5 to 10 to 20years criminal destruction that to life period, effects our every-day daily Bail Reform activities. The people of this This program would deny country are becoming hailtodefendantswhopresent frustrated and angry at a clear danger to society, having to live in fear of per- relative to previous criminal sonal harm at the hands of records; toughen thepenalties hoodlums and theives. They for bail jumping; deny in expect action, and Congress serious cases the release of and the federal government convicted defendants who are must respond. CONCORD--New Hampshire Gov. Hugh Gallen and the Executive Council have paved the way for intensified State Police patrols to promote highway safety during the holiday season. The Governor and Council approved a New Hampshire --. Highway Safety Agency ex- penditure of more than $25,800 to pay for the additional i patrols. The patrols will be manned by 136 overtime State Troopers who will be working a total of 19 extra days beginning with the Thanksgiving Day weekend and extending through New Year's. State Police Traffic Bureau Commander Major George Iverson characterized the extra effort as a "highly visible patrol". Iverson said "We want motorists to he aware of ore' vresence. We know tha A  greatest number of 6sts  will Obey the law when they are kept aware of the presence of State Police patrols." Iverson stressed the need for public cooperation. He urged that holiday party goers refrain from driving after drinking -- a major cause of accidents and highway fatalities. The extra patrols will be on the road throughout the state, though Iverson indicates the biggest problem area is in the Aimmn receives AF commendalion HANOVER-Senior Airman service in the performance of Mark W. Larocbe, son of their duties on behalf of the FrankA. Laroche of Berlin, AirForce. N.H., and Sylvia K. Laroche of Laroche, a security Hanover has been decorated specialist with the 42nd with the U.S. Air Force Security Police Squadron, is a Commendation Medal at 1980 graduate of Hanover High Loring Air Force Base, Me. School. The Air Force Cam- His wife, Ellen, is the mendation Medal is awarded daughter of Mr. and Mrs. to those individuals who Charles Stickwey of Norwich, demonstrate outstanding Vt. achievement or meritorious RI !AL BANK CELEBRATES VERSHIRE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR AND DANCE VERSHIRE--The PTA will sponsor a Christmas Bazaar on Dec. 12 at the Vershire Elementary School from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00p.m. Baked goods, ornaments, white elephant, a raffle, and movies will be on hand. Following the Bazaar will be a Contra Dance beginning at 7:30 p.m. A live band will be provided. Admission: adults, $2.00, children under 12, free. INTERESTING FACT Tailorbirds are named so because they sew large leaves together to form their nests. Using their bills as needles, they sew with strips of wool and silk, or plant fiber. , QUOTE "Where there is music there can be no harm." Spanish Proverb KORNER by L.F. BARNES a For the wee folk The leaves are fallen and tissue, half the tissue, or the brown. We await the snow, smaller square ones. Make (with a mixture of excitement and trepidation). flowers of yellow, pink, blue, green, or white; or a .special effect by mixing the colors together in one flower. Decorate packages with these tissue carnations, or arrange different sizes and colors together for a table bouquet. You could save some to hang on the Christmas tree, or hang as a fluffy pom-pom ball by a window. Scent with perfume if desired. (2) Paper lanterns. Fold a piece of colored construction paper in half lengthwise. Cut slits about one inch apart, stopping one inch from the edge of the paper. Unfold the paper. Roll it in a circle. Tape or paste the short ends together. And there is a paper lantern. The Halloween costumes are put away; and it's a bit early for Christmas. A teenage friend, Lois Wilder, suggested the , following paper decorations 8TH AN- which are fun for kids to Highlighting the Bank's gth make. They are non-seasonal, but can be used at any season. the awarding of a 1981 Honda (1.) Fluffy paper flowers: Jo Ann Hutchins of Lebanon. Use six or more two-ply facial to right) Kurt Gerrlsh of Gerrish tissues, laid evenly on top of one another. Tie together where the car was purchased; Jo tightly in the middle across Bank Staff; and Fred Dawe, the folded edges with string or The lucky entry was picked by Santa light wire. Carefully smrate 24th when be visited the Bank. On the tissue layers and push toward the center. This gives at 10 a.m., Santa Claus will again visit the layered petal effect of a at Hanover Street, Lebanon, and flower. to all children accompanied by an Different size flowers can be made by using the whole southern portion of the state where population density is greatest. Jay McDuffe,, coordinator of the New Hampshire High- way Safety Agency, says the holiday patrols are part of his agency's ongoing effort to reduce drunk driving, and promote highway safety in- cluding adherence to the 55 m.p.h, speed limit. Funds collected I for cancer in Obltuafles Orange County MONTPELIER--Mrs. Ruth Clements of Bradford and Dr. " James Woodruff of Randolph, Orange County Crusade Chairmen for the American Cancer Society, Vermont Division have reported that Orange County residents contributed $10,124 during the 1981 crusade. The Vermont Division raised $335,757 in this year's Crusade. The Division ranks third of 58 Divisions nationally in contributions per thousand dollars personal spendable income. Legacy gifts in the amount of $23,877. increased annual income to $359,634. The funds will be used to further the Society's programs of research, education and service. Sixty percent of the funds raised remains in Vermont to benefit residents. Forty percent goes to the Society's national office and is used primarily in the national research program. Here is a town-by-town analysis of Orange County results: ORANGE COUNTY Bradford $ 193.00 Braintree 701.60 Brookfield & East 1,336.50 Chelsea 376.47 Corinth, Corners & East 82.00 Fairlee & Ely 105.00 West Fairlee 179.75 Newbury & West 205.00 Orange 61.80 Randolph 3,800.45 Stratford & South 427.00 Thetford & Post Mills 93.00 Topsham & West 325.50 Tunbridge 382.10 Vershire 5.OO Washington -- Wells River 60.00 Williamstown 1,370.55 Countywide Special Events 419.28 TOTAL $10,124.00 Board says unlicensed "psychologists" may be practicing in Vermont MONTPELIER--The Board and social conflicts. of Psychological Examiners The law does however, has become" increasingly exclude qualified members of concerned about the people in other professional groups Vermont who are practicing from this restriction, in- psychology without a license cluding social workers. according to Molly Abare, physicians, teachers, secretaryf rd. ......... guidance  coelors, d very clear, ff you are not vermonters:sh'ould not be licensed, you cannot practice hesitant to inquire of the psychology, or call yourself a ecretary of State s Office if there ns any doubt that psychologist." The law defines the practice of psychology as including "assessment, diagnosis, prevention and amelioration of adjustment problems, and emotional and mental disorders of individuals and groups"..The law also in- cludes the use of hypnosis and the resolution of interpersonal New health coordinator for Alice Peck Day someone practicing psychology is properly qualified or licensed," said Abare. If Vermonters have com- plaints about licensed or unlicensed psychologists, Abate says the Board wants to hear about them. The board will investigate all complaints and "demand swift prosecution" of violations of the law. Abare said, "The practice of psychology is a new and vital profession, that the Gnerai Assembly has seen fit to regulate by our licensing board since 1976. Unqualified practitioners can pose a serious health risk to the public, and for that reason the board takes most seriously its responsibility to ensure that only qualified, licensed in- dividuals offer psychological services in Vermont." LEBANON--Daniel P. Fund Drive in Lebanon in 1975 and 1976. She also served as a long-time Girl Scout leader in Hanover. "We feel very lucky in having found someone of Pat Brent's caliber to carry on the work begun by Kathy Han- son," said Daniel Northrup. Ms. Brent, a resident of Thetford Center, Vt., ex- presses enthusiasm for APD's community health care ef- forts. "I feel a strong com- mitment," she said, "to community hospRals and to community involvement in health care issues. And I have a great deal of respect for the work that has been done in the community health program at APD. I hope to continue the projects started by Kathy Hanson, as well as expand on opportunities to work with local industry on developing programs specific to their needs." Another special area 603-353-4848. 2t12-9--p of interest for her is in ex- - Chapman H. Chamberlitt; schooled at Newbu00. SPRINGFIELD-- Chapman West Newbury; a son, H..Chamberlin, 64, died Chapman H. Chamberlin Jr., Sunday, Nov. 29 upon arrival Springfield; a granddaughter; at Springfield Hospital. two brothers, George H Born Oct..13, 1917 in Chamberlin, Laramie, Wyo., Merrimack, Mass.,hewasson and Irving W. Chamberlin, of George H. and Louella (Heath) Chamberlin. He graduated from Newbury High School and the Lincoln (Neb.) School of Aeronautics and Design. He retired in 1976 from the Fellows Corp. here after 38 years of employment as a toolmaker. Mr. Chamberlin was a member of the Church of Christ; St. John Masonic Lodge 41; the Experimental Aircraft Association and was a past commander of the local Civil Air Patrol. Surviving are his widow, the former June Solomon, whom panding health care programs for senior citizens. Northrup, Executive Director of Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital, has announced the appointment of Patricia Brent as the hospital's new Com- munity Health Care Coor- dinator. Ms. Brent replaces Kathleen Hanson, wbo created the Community Health Care Department at APD and started such programs as the award-winning "Safe Rider" project, a grant-funded adolescent parenting program, and an active volunteers program. Ms. Hanson has moved from the area. Ms. Brent brings to APD a master's degree in Com- munity Health from Emory University in Atlanta. She also holds a B.S. in medical technology from Vermont College. She is coming to APD from the Dartmouth Medical INTERESTING FACT The Battle of Bunker Hill was unique in that thousands of spectators in the Boston area had ringside seats for the spectacle. They sat on roof- tops, in treetops, on church steeples, and in the rigging of the ships in the harbor. School's Department of Community and Family Medicine, where she was a health educator on a chronic lung disease, project. Her previous involvement in the field has included work as a research technician in the Dartmouth Medical School's Department of Pathology, work as a volunteer educator for Planned Parenthood of the Upper Valley, and co-chair of the American Cancer Society Newbury; four sisters, Mrs. Vincent Jeroma, Randolph, Mass.; Mrs. C. George Wheeler, Haverhill, N.H. ; Mrs. Eric Piper, Newbury and Mrs. Alden Atwood, Orwell. Also surviving is Sarah A Chamberlin of Montpelier. who was raised by the Chamberlin family, as well as more distant relatives. Funeral services were held Tuesday in. the Church of Christ here. Arnold Holmes officiated. Burial was at the Oxbow Cemetery in Newbury. Memorial contributions may be made to the Church of Christ Memorial Fund, ARTESIAN WELL CO. ince 1930 Dex 176, Lebemm, N.H. .1.4102-29.5112 Free btbNdW he married Aug. 12, 1939 in Springfield05156. IN MEMORY SHELDON SIMPSON-- 1913 - 1981 Happy birthday, Daddy At last you've earned your rest You worked so hard through all the years To give us all the best. I miss your smile, your loving touch And ever helping hand You've risen to new Glory In God's illustrous land. We never got to say goodbye But Dad I feel you know You went ahead to pave the way For us to say hello. I Love you Dad, Marguerite Christ is coming again! We believe: "In the personal and premillennial and imminent coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and that this 'Blessed Hope' has a vital bearing on the personal life and service of the believer." You will find a group of believers who are eagerly awaiting His coming at: Bredford Evangelical Free Church % ,, ,,hi I) ,'r ire I I :o0 I{I)L "rE 5 unday %t'hool 9:4 I,I )4EI{ PI,AIN Bill % ick, M. Die.. Pastor , t,,2,222-,,2| r. " " Illll APARTMENT FOR Piermont. 3-room, second " EARING floor. For information call 603- PUBLIC H 272-5884. 2t--12-9--c TWO ROOM apartment. No pets. Heated, $140 per month, Bradford Village. 802-222-5777. Newbury Town Clerk's Office It---12-2---c FOR RENT-- 4-room apar- tment with bath. All utihties furnished. No pets. No children. $300 a month. Security deposit. Available now. Main St. Orford, N.H. Ill II II WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE (OMPt[ TF W Til YT[ M% IrTALL[ D FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL OR WRITE The E. BENEDINI I ; Newbury Planning Commission Application of Newbury Hydro Associates to re- activate a hydro electric site at Wells River Artesian Well Co. R D Bre, V 17, ,832 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE Thursday, December 17, 1981 7:30 P.M. Paper Mill. I Montebello Street Woodsville, NII/03785 603-747.2000 / I,I,()KI' ' "1{ ' N ,',()('IATI,L : "  PulMayette Albi,,,' .L I.,'ulhold , / 787-6270 Robert l)upuis 747-253 ! / LIST NO. 112 -- 7 room home in E. H;verhill, com- pletely remodeled kitchen -- 24' x 20'. Home is well kept inside & out. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath -- oil hot water heat. acre + or - for privacy and room for garden spot. Offered at $38,000. INCOME PROPERTY: 4 apartment building in very good condition inside & out. Downstairs has two 3 room apartments -- upstairs has one 3 room and one 4 room apartment. Each one comes with W-W carpet, closet space -- stove & refrigerator. Full basement --4 zones hot water oil heat. Third floor could be a 5th apartment. Income & expense figures available to in- terested buyers. $44,750. December 2, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 must be deterred Gregg looks at crime in U.S. Survey conducted by the to our economic Bureau of Justice Statistics is a topic of said nearly one of every three concern for households in the United throughout the States was directly affected to almost by some kind of serious crime public opinion last year. The FBI's Uniform Crime Report says the chance National Crime of being a victim of crime has grateful for the of the town Underhill last Fellowship the home of Mrs. Dec. 9th with Underhill and Putnam as co- are proud of who came in National Track last week. Keene, which he the 10th place leolleges. of hook awards in contest the library are: What I Think of it reminds me "and 4th grades -- 5th and 6th Dawn Stygles. and 2nd grades - 2nd Shane The winning collages are on library. They While there some craft different Craft are available for as well as the in the We know who is chair from and directions Wife. A complete )edia of 25 can also The staff are all willing to help of designs or execution. evening concert on his Estey he brought a rare treat. He construction of which he had tiny reeds, stops" which =is like even base viol, He out of town funeral service Goodwin last service for of W. Rumney, at 2:00 p.m. Chapel. , at the in White Friday after a two him at then played music from Handel, including "Water Music". Bach and Beethoven were beautifully performed, often giving the impression of full orchestra. Some ragtime followed by some requests and hymns sung by the audience completed the delightful evening. To some it recalled singing around the organ in earlier years and to others the time when a little boy pumped the church organ. Refresh- ments were served with an opportunity to talk with Bruce and see the organ at close range. A family gathering for Thanksgiving at the home of Mrs. Stephen Underhill in- cluded her sister, Mrs. Hazel Underhill from Marie's Nursing Home in Orford; Miriam - the Nortons and John's family from New Hampshire; and Buddy and family from Connecticut. The Lawrence Underhill fulfilled a long-time dream of spending the holiday quietly at their camp. We are proud of Mary Jane Hood, the only Piermont student to make a high school honor roll, -- Oxbow. The Floyd Smith family celebrated their first Thanksgiving in their new home with 18 members of the family present, ranging in age from Mrs. George Webster who is 90 to Eric Smith, age 4. Also spending their first Thanksgiving in their new home were the Smith-Evans family. Houses through the village were empty as Mrs. Clement Kinghorn spent the holiday with her son, Guy and family in Saxton's River, the James family had dinner in Glen- cliffe with Mr. and Mrs. Dale Knapp and family and Robert Evans and Mrs., Eugene Robbins celebrated at the home of the Arnold Shields. Floyd R. Ray 764-9979 the Parsonage. Church Sale Don't forget the Methodist Christmas Sale Friday, Dec. 4th at the Town Hall. Have a Happy Thanksgiving, you deserve it, then make someone else happy. Mrs. Doris Ball will not be in the town office this week as she will be enjoying a trip to Florida with relatives. !: PUBLIC NOTICE "Crime Index Offense" every two seconds (refer to Crime Clock Chart). Under present Federal Criminal Codes, only five percent of the street crimes fall under federal jurisdiction. However, despite this limited jurisdiction, there is a great deal that the federal gover- nment can do to holster anti- crime efforts by working with state and local authorities. Attorney General William French Smith recently released a report compiled by a special Administration Task Force on Violent Crime. These recommendations form the basis for legislative action to help stem the tide of violent crime. Sentencing Reforms The Task Force recom- mends abolishing parole at the federal level and substituting tripled since1960, awaiting sentencing or the According to the FBI, a outcome of an appcal. violent crime such as murder, Insanity Pleas forceable rape, robbery or Juries should be allowed to aggravated assault occurs find defendants "guilty but every 24 seconds. Property mentally ill," so that a crimes such as burglary, mentally ill defendant could larceny-theft or motor vehicle remain in custody even if theft occur eery three technically cleared of seconds. This translates into a responsibility of a crime. Narcotics Under this plan, we would see tougher enforcement of drug laws by beefing-up border patrols; increasing domestic enforcement; responsible use of herbicides to destroy drug crops; and increased military assistance in detecting air and sea drug traffic. Crime Watch Citizens would be en- couraged to take an active role in the deterrence of local neighborhood crime. Under this program community residents would he called upon to organize evening crime watch programs, and schedule meetings for dissemination of crime defense information. These are only some of the Administration's Crime Task Force recommendations for CRIME M&o%. off@ every 3 mlnulios every 6 minutes eve./ om, o AGGRAVATED ASSAULT every 4e ,ecoe, / %/ sets VIOI.ENT CRIME every 24 eeconde \\; / .... N CRIME INDEX OFFENBIE every :t seconds LT. GENERAL SPEAKS IN VERMONT-- Lt. General La Verne E. Weber, chief at the National Guard Bureau at the Pentagon, spoke recently to the Ethan Allen Chapter of The Association of the United States Army. In his address, Weber stressed the role of today's National Guard in our nation's defense, CLOCK State Police patrols will increase for the holidays PROPERTY CRIME ever/$oMe A # % LARCENY.THEFT BURGLARY 4 soconcle one MOTOR YEHiCLE THEFT every :tO eocoe,de Sem:.CnmolmlkeUelmdimjee. rib. :me,, 10 0el a system of modest good- both legislative and cam- behavior credits which would mnnity action to help stem be used to earn early parole, increases in crime. There is no Sentencing. , uder. this reasen that cities, and proviSion would '! for a rural areas of this country specific number of years should be plagued with rather than a 5 to 10 to 20years criminal destruction that to life period, effects our every-day daily Bail Reform activities. The people of this This program would deny country are becoming hailtodefendantswhopresent frustrated and angry at a clear danger to society, having to live in fear of per- relative to previous criminal sonal harm at the hands of records; toughen thepenalties hoodlums and theives. They for bail jumping; deny in expect action, and Congress serious cases the release of and the federal government convicted defendants who are must respond. CONCORD--New Hampshire Gov. Hugh Gallen and the Executive Council have paved the way for intensified State Police patrols to promote highway safety during the holiday season. The Governor and Council approved a New Hampshire --. Highway Safety Agency ex- penditure of more than $25,800 to pay for the additional i patrols. The patrols will be manned by 136 overtime State Troopers who will be working a total of 19 extra days beginning with the Thanksgiving Day weekend and extending through New Year's. State Police Traffic Bureau Commander Major George Iverson characterized the extra effort as a "highly visible patrol". Iverson said "We want motorists to he aware of ore' vresence. We know tha A  greatest number of 6sts  will Obey the law when they are kept aware of the presence of State Police patrols." Iverson stressed the need for public cooperation. He urged that holiday party goers refrain from driving after drinking -- a major cause of accidents and highway fatalities. The extra patrols will be on the road throughout the state, though Iverson indicates the biggest problem area is in the Aimmn receives AF commendalion HANOVER-Senior Airman service in the performance of Mark W. Larocbe, son of their duties on behalf of the FrankA. Laroche of Berlin, AirForce. N.H., and Sylvia K. Laroche of Laroche, a security Hanover has been decorated specialist with the 42nd with the U.S. Air Force Security Police Squadron, is a Commendation Medal at 1980 graduate of Hanover High Loring Air Force Base, Me. School. The Air Force Cam- His wife, Ellen, is the mendation Medal is awarded daughter of Mr. and Mrs. to those individuals who Charles Stickwey of Norwich, demonstrate outstanding Vt. achievement or meritorious RI !AL BANK CELEBRATES VERSHIRE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR AND DANCE VERSHIRE--The PTA will sponsor a Christmas Bazaar on Dec. 12 at the Vershire Elementary School from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00p.m. Baked goods, ornaments, white elephant, a raffle, and movies will be on hand. Following the Bazaar will be a Contra Dance beginning at 7:30 p.m. A live band will be provided. Admission: adults, $2.00, children under 12, free. INTERESTING FACT Tailorbirds are named so because they sew large leaves together to form their nests. Using their bills as needles, they sew with strips of wool and silk, or plant fiber. , QUOTE "Where there is music there can be no harm." Spanish Proverb KORNER by L.F. BARNES a For the wee folk The leaves are fallen and tissue, half the tissue, or the brown. We await the snow, smaller square ones. Make (with a mixture of excitement and trepidation). flowers of yellow, pink, blue, green, or white; or a .special effect by mixing the colors together in one flower. Decorate packages with these tissue carnations, or arrange different sizes and colors together for a table bouquet. You could save some to hang on the Christmas tree, or hang as a fluffy pom-pom ball by a window. Scent with perfume if desired. (2) Paper lanterns. Fold a piece of colored construction paper in half lengthwise. Cut slits about one inch apart, stopping one inch from the edge of the paper. Unfold the paper. Roll it in a circle. Tape or paste the short ends together. And there is a paper lantern. The Halloween costumes are put away; and it's a bit early for Christmas. A teenage friend, Lois Wilder, suggested the , following paper decorations 8TH AN- which are fun for kids to Highlighting the Bank's gth make. They are non-seasonal, but can be used at any season. the awarding of a 1981 Honda (1.) Fluffy paper flowers: Jo Ann Hutchins of Lebanon. Use six or more two-ply facial to right) Kurt Gerrlsh of Gerrish tissues, laid evenly on top of one another. Tie together where the car was purchased; Jo tightly in the middle across Bank Staff; and Fred Dawe, the folded edges with string or The lucky entry was picked by Santa light wire. Carefully smrate 24th when be visited the Bank. On the tissue layers and push toward the center. This gives at 10 a.m., Santa Claus will again visit the layered petal effect of a at Hanover Street, Lebanon, and flower. to all children accompanied by an Different size flowers can be made by using the whole southern portion of the state where population density is greatest. Jay McDuffe,, coordinator of the New Hampshire High- way Safety Agency, says the holiday patrols are part of his agency's ongoing effort to reduce drunk driving, and promote highway safety in- cluding adherence to the 55 m.p.h, speed limit. Funds collected I for cancer in Obltuafles Orange County MONTPELIER--Mrs. Ruth Clements of Bradford and Dr. " James Woodruff of Randolph, Orange County Crusade Chairmen for the American Cancer Society, Vermont Division have reported that Orange County residents contributed $10,124 during the 1981 crusade. The Vermont Division raised $335,757 in this year's Crusade. The Division ranks third of 58 Divisions nationally in contributions per thousand dollars personal spendable income. Legacy gifts in the amount of $23,877. increased annual income to $359,634. The funds will be used to further the Society's programs of research, education and service. Sixty percent of the funds raised remains in Vermont to benefit residents. Forty percent goes to the Society's national office and is used primarily in the national research program. Here is a town-by-town analysis of Orange County results: ORANGE COUNTY Bradford $ 193.00 Braintree 701.60 Brookfield & East 1,336.50 Chelsea 376.47 Corinth, Corners & East 82.00 Fairlee & Ely 105.00 West Fairlee 179.75 Newbury & West 205.00 Orange 61.80 Randolph 3,800.45 Stratford & South 427.00 Thetford & Post Mills 93.00 Topsham & West 325.50 Tunbridge 382.10 Vershire 5.OO Washington -- Wells River 60.00 Williamstown 1,370.55 Countywide Special Events 419.28 TOTAL $10,124.00 Board says unlicensed "psychologists" may be practicing in Vermont MONTPELIER--The Board and social conflicts. of Psychological Examiners The law does however, has become" increasingly exclude qualified members of concerned about the people in other professional groups Vermont who are practicing from this restriction, in- psychology without a license cluding social workers. according to Molly Abare, physicians, teachers, secretaryf rd. ......... guidance  coelors, d very clear, ff you are not vermonters:sh'ould not be licensed, you cannot practice hesitant to inquire of the psychology, or call yourself a ecretary of State s Office if there ns any doubt that psychologist." The law defines the practice of psychology as including "assessment, diagnosis, prevention and amelioration of adjustment problems, and emotional and mental disorders of individuals and groups"..The law also in- cludes the use of hypnosis and the resolution of interpersonal New health coordinator for Alice Peck Day someone practicing psychology is properly qualified or licensed," said Abare. If Vermonters have com- plaints about licensed or unlicensed psychologists, Abate says the Board wants to hear about them. The board will investigate all complaints and "demand swift prosecution" of violations of the law. Abare said, "The practice of psychology is a new and vital profession, that the Gnerai Assembly has seen fit to regulate by our licensing board since 1976. Unqualified practitioners can pose a serious health risk to the public, and for that reason the board takes most seriously its responsibility to ensure that only qualified, licensed in- dividuals offer psychological services in Vermont." LEBANON--Daniel P. Fund Drive in Lebanon in 1975 and 1976. She also served as a long-time Girl Scout leader in Hanover. "We feel very lucky in having found someone of Pat Brent's caliber to carry on the work begun by Kathy Han- son," said Daniel Northrup. Ms. Brent, a resident of Thetford Center, Vt., ex- presses enthusiasm for APD's community health care ef- forts. "I feel a strong com- mitment," she said, "to community hospRals and to community involvement in health care issues. And I have a great deal of respect for the work that has been done in the community health program at APD. I hope to continue the projects started by Kathy Hanson, as well as expand on opportunities to work with local industry on developing programs specific to their needs." Another special area 603-353-4848. 2t12-9--p of interest for her is in ex- - Chapman H. Chamberlitt; schooled at Newbu00. SPRINGFIELD-- Chapman West Newbury; a son, H..Chamberlin, 64, died Chapman H. Chamberlin Jr., Sunday, Nov. 29 upon arrival Springfield; a granddaughter; at Springfield Hospital. two brothers, George H Born Oct..13, 1917 in Chamberlin, Laramie, Wyo., Merrimack, Mass.,hewasson and Irving W. Chamberlin, of George H. and Louella (Heath) Chamberlin. He graduated from Newbury High School and the Lincoln (Neb.) School of Aeronautics and Design. He retired in 1976 from the Fellows Corp. here after 38 years of employment as a toolmaker. Mr. Chamberlin was a member of the Church of Christ; St. John Masonic Lodge 41; the Experimental Aircraft Association and was a past commander of the local Civil Air Patrol. Surviving are his widow, the former June Solomon, whom panding health care programs for senior citizens. Northrup, Executive Director of Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital, has announced the appointment of Patricia Brent as the hospital's new Com- munity Health Care Coor- dinator. Ms. Brent replaces Kathleen Hanson, wbo created the Community Health Care Department at APD and started such programs as the award-winning "Safe Rider" project, a grant-funded adolescent parenting program, and an active volunteers program. Ms. Hanson has moved from the area. Ms. Brent brings to APD a master's degree in Com- munity Health from Emory University in Atlanta. She also holds a B.S. in medical technology from Vermont College. She is coming to APD from the Dartmouth Medical INTERESTING FACT The Battle of Bunker Hill was unique in that thousands of spectators in the Boston area had ringside seats for the spectacle. They sat on roof- tops, in treetops, on church steeples, and in the rigging of the ships in the harbor. School's Department of Community and Family Medicine, where she was a health educator on a chronic lung disease, project. Her previous involvement in the field has included work as a research technician in the Dartmouth Medical School's Department of Pathology, work as a volunteer educator for Planned Parenthood of the Upper Valley, and co-chair of the American Cancer Society Newbury; four sisters, Mrs. Vincent Jeroma, Randolph, Mass.; Mrs. C. George Wheeler, Haverhill, N.H. ; Mrs. Eric Piper, Newbury and Mrs. Alden Atwood, Orwell. Also surviving is Sarah A Chamberlin of Montpelier. who was raised by the Chamberlin family, as well as more distant relatives. Funeral services were held Tuesday in. the Church of Christ here. Arnold Holmes officiated. Burial was at the Oxbow Cemetery in Newbury. Memorial contributions may be made to the Church of Christ Memorial Fund, ARTESIAN WELL CO. ince 1930 Dex 176, Lebemm, N.H. .1.4102-29.5112 Free btbNdW he married Aug. 12, 1939 in Springfield05156. IN MEMORY SHELDON SIMPSON-- 1913 - 1981 Happy birthday, Daddy At last you've earned your rest You worked so hard through all the years To give us all the best. I miss your smile, your loving touch And ever helping hand You've risen to new Glory In God's illustrous land. We never got to say goodbye But Dad I feel you know You went ahead to pave the way For us to say hello. I Love you Dad, Marguerite Christ is coming again! We believe: "In the personal and premillennial and imminent coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and that this 'Blessed Hope' has a vital bearing on the personal life and service of the believer." You will find a group of believers who are eagerly awaiting His coming at: Bredford Evangelical Free Church % ,, ,,hi I) ,'r ire I I :o0 I{I)L "rE 5 unday %t'hool 9:4 I,I )4EI{ PI,AIN Bill % ick, M. Die.. Pastor , t,,2,222-,,2| r. " " Illll APARTMENT FOR Piermont. 3-room, second " EARING floor. For information call 603- PUBLIC H 272-5884. 2t--12-9--c TWO ROOM apartment. No pets. Heated, $140 per month, Bradford Village. 802-222-5777. Newbury Town Clerk's Office It---12-2---c FOR RENT-- 4-room apar- tment with bath. All utihties furnished. No pets. No children. $300 a month. Security deposit. Available now. Main St. Orford, N.H. Ill II II WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE (OMPt[ TF W Til YT[ M% IrTALL[ D FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL OR WRITE The E. BENEDINI I ; Newbury Planning Commission Application of Newbury Hydro Associates to re- activate a hydro electric site at Wells River Artesian Well Co. R D Bre, V 17, ,832 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE Thursday, December 17, 1981 7:30 P.M. Paper Mill. I Montebello Street Woodsville, NII/03785 603-747.2000 / I,I,()KI' ' "1{ ' N ,',()('IATI,L : "  PulMayette Albi,,,' .L I.,'ulhold , / 787-6270 Robert l)upuis 747-253 ! / LIST NO. 112 -- 7 room home in E. H;verhill, com- pletely remodeled kitchen -- 24' x 20'. Home is well kept inside & out. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath -- oil hot water heat. acre + or - for privacy and room for garden spot. Offered at $38,000. INCOME PROPERTY: 4 apartment building in very good condition inside & out. Downstairs has two 3 room apartments -- upstairs has one 3 room and one 4 room apartment. Each one comes with W-W carpet, closet space -- stove & refrigerator. Full basement --4 zones hot water oil heat. Third floor could be a 5th apartment. Income & expense figures available to in- terested buyers. $44,750.