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December 2, 1981     Journal Opinion
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EMMA ( ;" Ill.VltiG Ill:Ill,IN 1911 tune, the Alley's most popular song, did not have a ragtime beat at all. MENDELSOHN Service lqUite a racket. From of "music tiny to be as rooms--there court- sound. Above the rmaginative listener hear the lone cash register. the song of a There went the tune uartet clamored .All the while, pounded long- hts. peopl hard at job was buying and selling popular songs. Their office was a New York publishing house at the turn of the century. Throughout the building, rows of cubicles held staff singers and company pianists demonstrating and teaching new songs to vaudevillians and musical performers eager for fresh material. In the early 1900s, New York City was not yet the Big Apple, but it was certainly the top banana of the American en- tertainment business. Th@ Gay White Way was lined with theaters stretching along Broadway from 14th to 42nd. Only a Paper Tune Marquees, twinkling with star lights, thanks to the new Edison lamps, beckoned to the dark hinterland. The saloons and bistros even had singing waiters. An 18- year-old lad named Irving Berlin served tables, swept floors and entertained the customers at Pelham's Cafe in New York's Chinatown. Here, in 1907, Berlin wrote the lyrics for his first published song, "Marie from Sunny Italy." It earned him 37 cents. His fortune would improve in short order--and not in a restaurant. When "Alexan- der's Ragtime Band" was presented in 1911 by the likes of Sophie Tucker, no one cared that it was not written in ragtime. In a few months, Berlin's song bad sold well over a million copies. "If you follow the footsteps of Irving Berlin, you can trace the pathway of Tin Pan Alley," says Carl Scheele, curator of community life at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. Irving Berlin did it all. He wrote "ragtime" songs, ballads and comic songs. He wrote songs for Broadway and for Hollywood. In two world wars, he wrote songs for the troops. For 70 years, top talents have sung his songs in vaudeville, musicals and movies, on records, radio and television. We sing them today. Berlin's "Easter Parade" (1933) will always conjure up a stroll down Fifth Avenue awash with fantastic bonnets. "White Christmas" (1942) is second only to "Silent Night" as a yuletide favorite. "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1946) is the unofficial anthem of the en- tertainment world. And Berlin's "God Bless America" (1939) is the second anthem of the nation itself. In the musical mecca where the young singing waiter from the Lower East Side got his start, new songs were in constant demand. They were turned out on an assembly line: composers, lyricists, arrangers and demonstrators. The publisher was king of this castle of song and got most of the gold. But the "plugger" was prince and got most of the attention. Before radio and talking pictures, the success or failure of a song depended on the plugger's skill in selling it. He would burst into song at the drop of a parade, picnic, political rally or packed playhouse. Wherever people played, he worked. Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern and George Gershwin all got their Tin Pan Alley Quiz by INK MENDELSOHN songs? What were the songs? Bacall's in the film To Have Smithsonian News Service (20) 4. Which brothers were 100-150TOP BANANA musical team as composer 75- 99 BIG APPLE and lyricist? (5) 55- 74 YOU'RE THE 5. In what film was the song BERRIES "Singin' in the Rain" first 25- 54 NOT A LEMON heard? (5) (exactly) a. Broadway Melody under 25 SOUR GRAPES b. Singin' in the Rain c. Hollywood Revue of 1929 1. Which of these songs was 6. Which of these celestial number one on the very first Academy Award-winning Your Hit Parade radio show songs was cut from the picture on April 20, 19357 Name the throe times before its ultimate composers. (20 points) a. "Lovely to Look At" b. "Lullaby of Broadway" C. "Soon" 2. Which song below was the first to win an Oscar as best screen song? In what movie was each first heard? (20) a. "Sonny Boy" (De Sylva, Brown and Henderson) b. "You Were Meant For Me" (Brown and Freed) c. "The Continental" (Conrad and Magidson) 3. Which two top female singers of the forties took their names from Tin Pan Alley triumph? In what motion picture was each first heard? (2) a. "Over the Rainbow" b. "Swinging on a Star" c. "Moon River" 7. Who was "the groaner"? The "swooner"? (10) 8. Name the respective composer subjects of these 1940s musical movie biographies: (15) a. Till the Clouds Roll By b. Night and Day c. Words and Music 9. (Warning, this is a tonghie. ) Whose singing voice was dubbed for Lauren and Have Not? What was the song? Who was the composer? (15) I0. CA Smithsonain bonus.) Name the composition, written in honor of a famous newspaper's essay award ceremony on the grounds of the Smithsonain Institution in 1889, that came to influence • Tin Pan Alley with its martial rhythms. (Give yourself 20 points. ) ANSWERS I. (I); Jerome Kern, A1 Dubin & Harry Warren, Rodgers & Hart. 2. (c); from The Gay Divorcee; (a) The Singing Fool, (b) Broadway Melody. 3. Doris Day, "Day after Day"; Dinah Shore, "Dinah". 4. George and Ira Gershwin. 5. (c). 6. (a) The Wizard of Oz; (b) was in Going My Way; (c) in Break- fast at Tiffany's. 7. Bang Crosby, Frank Sinatra. 8. Ca) Jerome Kern, (b) Cole Porter, (c) Rodgers & Hart. 9. Andy Williams, "How Little We Know", Joagy Carmichael. I0. "The Washington Post" (John Philip Sousa). start as pluggers. Until World War I, the largest concentration of music publishing houses in the world was on both sides of a single New York block--28th Street between 5th Avenue and Broadway. This was Tin Pan Alley. Or so it came to be called around 1903, popularized by one Monroe H. Rosenfeld, song-writer, journalist, ban vivant and connoisseur of promising ponies. One historic day, the story goes, instead of visiting the racetrack, Rosenfeld went to see Harry o Van Tilzer, the most prolific "6 tunesmith of the time.._ Rosenfeld needed a title for an . article he had written about the popular music business. - Not one to waste time, Van = Tilzer, who wrote throe songs a day, began to play his 5 special piano, which had strips of newspaper woven through its strings. The result was a tinny sound. "There's my name," exclaimed In 1928, a musical tribute to Henry Ford's "Lizzie" applauded her lack of rattles and  her new "sex- appeal." Rosenfeld. "Your Kindler and was full of inventiveness and A magnetic performer, it Collins sounds exactly like a enthusiasm. His famous seemed, could sell almost any Tin Pan. I'll call my article bended-knoe delivery was the song. A banana-split of music Tin Pan Alley." result of an ingrown toenail, from Handel's "Hallelujah During a performance one Chorus". and three otbersonga night, he got down on one knee was a flop until Eddie Cantor to relieve the pressure from brought down the house in 1923 the offending toe and span- with "Yes, We Have No taneously throw out his arms Bananas." as if to embrace the audience. Far from the lights of They loved it. He kept it in the Broadway, America was act. singing on its own. By the turn Jolson put over George of the century, mass-produeod Gershwin's first hit, pianos had brought music into "Swanee," in 1919, after 70 even the most modest parlor. musicians and 60 chorus girls In 1902, a great popular dancing in the dark with composer's career began on electric lights on their shoes this note. failed to sell it. (please turn to page 9A) Tin Pan Alley. The words have a harsh sound, and in- deed, tough scraps were fought in the Alley. Pluggers competed fiercely, enticing performers with cash and gifts to get their songs before the public. A1 Jolson once received a race horse for performing a number. The conventional Alley wisdom was that if Jolson sang your song, it would be a hit. Most often it was. AI Jolson was a STAR. He TODAY'S CHUCKLE By the time a man realizes that maybe his father was right, he usually has a son who thinks he's wrong!" €IICUIATING IN:  NAIIPSNIM -- Lyres, Lyme Center, afford, Orfordvil/a, Pisrmont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, tisbon, tandaff, Benton. Lyman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . VlilMOIIT -- Thetford, Łast Thefford, Theffo_rd Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairies, West Fairies, Bradford, Bradford Vii/age, Corinth, East Cor;nth, Topshom, West Topsham, Hewhury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryegote Corner, Łast RyegOte, Sooth Ryeuote, r=eocham, Barnet, West Bsrnet. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,220 Number32 .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont A guide to *:,. rOlqllng the holiday hustle Christmas mailing and ZIP Code reserved for the Christmas and other holiday few simple suggestions: hassle-free holidays ahead, Bradford lastline, cards. Letter size standards CUSHION--Make sure McDonald is "It is also a good idea to put require that envelopes be at contents are well-cushioned by LOUISE PARKER months ago in order to enjoy and which ca you do without? to a slip of paper with the least 3v2 inches high and 5 and there is no empty space in HOYDE this Christmas season. The Giving up the usual week- their cards and recipient's name and address arrive on time and and your return address inside parcels, and be sure the ad- to shopping and dressing on the outside of the customers are parcel includes your return properly address address and ZIP Code," Packages with the McDonald says. number and Customers are also office box reminded to check the size of the city, state their envelopes before mailing inches long to be accepted for mailing. The Postal Service is also asking customers to put an ounce of extra care into preparing parcel post and other packages for mailing. Parcels will arrive at their intended destination in good shape if mailers will follow a A COLORFUL CHRISTMAS greens, purples, to your holiday blaze to brighten festive season. All is a little pow- boric acid {bright copper sulfate chloride chloride (red), lithium chloride (crimson), potassium chloride (pur- chloride (orange), baking soda (yellow orange), or ordinary table salt !that--except for the very common boric acid, baking soda, and table salt--all are either chlorides or sulfates. (Do which can be hazardous.) Any well-stocked. should be able to furnish you with a pound or so of most of the specified For those you can't locate at a pharmacy, try the nearest chemical sup- not at all dangerous to work with.., or to burn, when hen- But a few precautions are in order: Store all your prismatic fireplace in tightly sealed glass or plastic containers in a dry and well-ventilated out of the reach of both children and pets. Prepare only as much of each you need at one time, wear rubber gloves when you work, and do outdoors. Don't burn treated wood, paper, etc. until your fire has a good developed a healthy draft. And, of course, never attempt to roast other treats over such a fire, to avoid food contamination by any smoke. way to add these multiple colors to .holiday fis is by soaking wood corncobs, and other burnables in a one-to-three solution of any of the above. That is: Mix one cup of a coloring substance with three and stir the solution thoroughly until the powder has completely uid in a plastic garbage can. Then soak chunks of wood for about newspapers until they're completely saturated, and pinecones small items for five to ten minutes. Once that's done, remove the materi- coloring agent, let them drain over the garbage can, and place them on of paper. (These "drying" papers can, of course, later be rolled up and the colorful glow of your fire, you mighillke to make a few  decorations. Here's how: half-cup of kernels {but not over a fire using the decorative chemicals) the fluffy corn Is cooling--place one-half cup of light corn syrup, one-half saucepan. Cook the mixture, over me- the sugar is thoroughly dissolved, then add a few drops of red (or you pfer) food coloring and one-half teaspoon of lemon extract. Stir until and color are well spread throughout the [oey concoction, and pour eo Xture over the bowlful of popcorn. Stir agem, making sure every piece steal. Finally, working with buttered hands, ball up the coated popcorn ornaments". Wrap the finished baubles in clear cellophane, use a paper tdd a bright bow, and use them for colorful holiday decorationsl on Christmas projects or on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS • magazine, Send MORE... With LESS!, bare at this paper. Ask for Reprint No. 636: "The MI the box. Use crumpled newspaper around the item--including all sides, top and bottom. Commercially avaiiahle foam shells or air- pocket padding also make good cushioning materials. DON'T OVERWRAP--Just use your carton. Brown paper and twine cord are not necessary. Paper can rip, and twine can become entangled with processing equipment. SEAL PROPERLY--Close your parcel with one of the three recommended types of tape: pressure sensitive, nylon-reinforced kraft paper, or glass-reinforced pressure sensitive. AVOID SMUDGES--Use smudge-proof ink for your addressing. LOCATE ADDRESSES PROPERLY-- Put the recipient's address in the lower right portion of the container. Put your return address in the upper left hand corner. Remove all other labels from the box. USE ZIP CODES-- Be sure to include the ZIP Code in both the recipient's and your return address. TIME IT RIGHT-- Mail early in the month and early in the day. This will help you avoid the rush. USE THE RIGHT SER- VICE -- Irreplaceable items, cash and other valuables should be sent hy registered mail. IF YOU RUN OUT OF TIME-- Priority Mail affords First-Class handling for packages weighing over 12 ounces and up to 70 pounds. Priority Mail can be sent from any post office, station or branch or through rural carriers to any address in the U. S. Priority Mail can even be used for foreign mailings. The service is available with insurance, return receipt, COD, certificates of mailing and special delivery. Customers interested in Priority Mail should contact the post office for details. Extension Specialist, Family Resource Management University of N.H. Less than a month is left until Christmas. How can it be? The holiday was creeping up while you were still busy thinking about where to store the summer beach umbrella, how to =make the Star Wars costume your child requested for Halloween and when you should take the car in for its snow tire fitting. So whom are you comparing yourself to this year? Maybe it's your neighbor whose cards were addressed in September, whose shopping was com- pleted in October and whose cookies were baked ahead and frozen in November. She's the one who will have the spare bulbs on hand when a tree light fails and manages eaeh year to have the last strand of post-holiday tinsel picked out of the corner before yon even take down the decorations. Before you spend a lot of energy feeling guilty about your less impressive Christmas credentials, remember the number one rule of holiday management: No Comparisons. Everybody knows and envies that person who appears to have a habitual handle on the holidays. But you don't need to be accomplishing all the tasks that the "perfect planner" chooses to take on. Nor do you need to have started on them secret is setting your own standards, the ones that are both realistic and satisfying for you and your family. R's not too late to make plans for a hassle-free holiday. Where to begin? Here are a few ideas: -- Establish a holiday target. This is an important first step as it provides direction for the rest of your holiday plans. Set a dollar amount which is consistent with your current financial situation, one which will not require a large pereentage of your savings or plunge you into post-holiday debt. Once you've chosen an expense limit, decide how much to allocate to specific categories: gifts, decorations, entertainment, travel and any others that fit your situation. Then stick to it. Be con- scientious about recording holiday expenses as they occur and don't fudge more than a few dollars over your original budget. -- Make Christmas planning a family affair. Sit down together and talk about how you'll celebrate this year. Which "traditions" are musts FIREWOOD & TREE SERVICE Mixed Hardwood $70. cord. Cut, split, delivered. Bob Holly: call 222-4566 before 8:00 a.m., after 5: 00 after-Christmas ski trip may be necessary in order to finance gift-giving this year. Set priorities as a family and talk it through until com- promises are reaehed. It's helpful to use a system in looking at holiday-related tasks. Try making a family list of "to be dorms" and run each item through this set of questions: -- Why is this to be done? Decide if the task is essential in meeting family holiday goals. Could it, or parts of it, be eliminated? You might be surprised how effectively this step can shorten your list. -- Who should do it? If holiday work is still a one- person proposition, this is the year for a change. Balance the load among family members. Have the kids do the decorating and Dad take over the Christmas card list. Try (please turn to page 6A) PROFESSIONAL TYPING LEITERS - REPORTS - RESUME TECHNICAL 1YPING - THESIS LOUKE MOON BOX 409, BRADFORD, VT. 05033 222-9029 TABOR VALLEY PLAYERS PRESENTS: Treasures On Earth Dee. 3-4-5 at 8 p.m. j Town Hall--E. Topsham, Vt. TICKETS AT THE DOORI Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 i.t Your ad, this size, on page of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 Deer Skins and all wild furs. Coon, Fox, Coyote, Rats, Mink. TOP PRICES ASSURED FAIRLEE GENERAL STORE Fairlee, Vt. -- 333-9407 BRADFORD GAME ROOM VIDEO-- SUPERVISED -- PINBALL (Behind Allen's Western Auto) Monday-Friday-- 3-9 PM -- Sat. 1-9 PM December 2,191 1981 beef cook-off champ Sweet Meat Bars captured Beef Industry Council of the the first prize at the eighth National Live Stock and Meat annual National Beef Cook-Off Board, is held. each year to held recently in Sioux Falls, promote the understanding South Dakota. The creator of and preparation of the more these novel beef cookies or economical cuts of beef. Since dessert squares was Con- its beginning in 1974, the Cook- stance Beckwith of North Off has grown annually with Franklin, Connecticut. To win this year's contest drawing the prize of $1,500, Mrs. Beck- entrants from 47 states. with sandwiched a minced The 1982 National Beef meat-like filling made with Cook-Off promises to be ground beef chuck and bigger and better than ever. cranberry sauce between Prize money has been in- layers of rich cookie dough. Creased for next year's con- A salad entry, "Tarragon test. The first prize awardwill Beefsteak Salad", won second be $5,000; the second, $2,500; place and $750 for Marcia the third, $1,000 and five Dillon Whitson of Silver honorable mentions of $300 Springs, Maryland. Awarded each. To be held in San the $500 third prize was Antonio, Texas September 20- "Magic Eye of the Round," 22, 1982, it is open to all non- the entry of Carol Carroll of professional cooks. Rules Winchester, Virginia. folders, including entry forms, The National Beef Cook-Off, can be obtained from Mrs. sponsored by the American Bailey Crain, P.O. Box 245, National CowBelles and the Pearsali, Texas 78061. l 5th An?ual Workbench Christmas Bazaar ] I qkr" s :h edU7361Sc h'5L lW MR'i; ;rlV t" i / [ SANTA'S VISITING HOURS-- II AM- I rm Orange East Senior Citizens Clu00 Bradford, Vt.-- (Colatina Bakery) ff b Friday, Dec. 4th -- 10AM - 4 PM ., ff' HANDICRAFTS-- GIFTS-- BAKED GOODS  'i CHRISTMAS ITEMS -- ATTIC TREASURES ilMJ---- CHRISTMAS WREATHIqRI Sale & Luncheo SATURDAY. DEC. Methodist Church, Bradford, Vt. EMMA ( ;" Ill.VltiG Ill:Ill,IN 1911 tune, the Alley's most popular song, did not have a ragtime beat at all. MENDELSOHN Service lqUite a racket. From of "music tiny to be as rooms--there court- sound. Above the rmaginative listener hear the lone cash register. the song of a There went the tune uartet clamored .All the while, pounded long- hts. peopl hard at job was buying and selling popular songs. Their office was a New York publishing house at the turn of the century. Throughout the building, rows of cubicles held staff singers and company pianists demonstrating and teaching new songs to vaudevillians and musical performers eager for fresh material. In the early 1900s, New York City was not yet the Big Apple, but it was certainly the top banana of the American en- tertainment business. Th@ Gay White Way was lined with theaters stretching along Broadway from 14th to 42nd. Only a Paper Tune Marquees, twinkling with star lights, thanks to the new Edison lamps, beckoned to the dark hinterland. The saloons and bistros even had singing waiters. An 18- year-old lad named Irving Berlin served tables, swept floors and entertained the customers at Pelham's Cafe in New York's Chinatown. Here, in 1907, Berlin wrote the lyrics for his first published song, "Marie from Sunny Italy." It earned him 37 cents. His fortune would improve in short order--and not in a restaurant. When "Alexan- der's Ragtime Band" was presented in 1911 by the likes of Sophie Tucker, no one cared that it was not written in ragtime. In a few months, Berlin's song bad sold well over a million copies. "If you follow the footsteps of Irving Berlin, you can trace the pathway of Tin Pan Alley," says Carl Scheele, curator of community life at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. Irving Berlin did it all. He wrote "ragtime" songs, ballads and comic songs. He wrote songs for Broadway and for Hollywood. In two world wars, he wrote songs for the troops. For 70 years, top talents have sung his songs in vaudeville, musicals and movies, on records, radio and television. We sing them today. Berlin's "Easter Parade" (1933) will always conjure up a stroll down Fifth Avenue awash with fantastic bonnets. "White Christmas" (1942) is second only to "Silent Night" as a yuletide favorite. "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1946) is the unofficial anthem of the en- tertainment world. And Berlin's "God Bless America" (1939) is the second anthem of the nation itself. In the musical mecca where the young singing waiter from the Lower East Side got his start, new songs were in constant demand. They were turned out on an assembly line: composers, lyricists, arrangers and demonstrators. The publisher was king of this castle of song and got most of the gold. But the "plugger" was prince and got most of the attention. Before radio and talking pictures, the success or failure of a song depended on the plugger's skill in selling it. He would burst into song at the drop of a parade, picnic, political rally or packed playhouse. Wherever people played, he worked. Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern and George Gershwin all got their Tin Pan Alley Quiz by INK MENDELSOHN songs? What were the songs? Bacall's in the film To Have Smithsonian News Service (20) 4. Which brothers were 100-150TOP BANANA musical team as composer 75- 99 BIG APPLE and lyricist? (5) 55- 74 YOU'RE THE 5. In what film was the song BERRIES "Singin' in the Rain" first 25- 54 NOT A LEMON heard? (5) (exactly) a. Broadway Melody under 25 SOUR GRAPES b. Singin' in the Rain c. Hollywood Revue of 1929 1. Which of these songs was 6. Which of these celestial number one on the very first Academy Award-winning Your Hit Parade radio show songs was cut from the picture on April 20, 19357 Name the throe times before its ultimate composers. (20 points) a. "Lovely to Look At" b. "Lullaby of Broadway" C. "Soon" 2. Which song below was the first to win an Oscar as best screen song? In what movie was each first heard? (20) a. "Sonny Boy" (De Sylva, Brown and Henderson) b. "You Were Meant For Me" (Brown and Freed) c. "The Continental" (Conrad and Magidson) 3. Which two top female singers of the forties took their names from Tin Pan Alley triumph? In what motion picture was each first heard? (2) a. "Over the Rainbow" b. "Swinging on a Star" c. "Moon River" 7. Who was "the groaner"? The "swooner"? (10) 8. Name the respective composer subjects of these 1940s musical movie biographies: (15) a. Till the Clouds Roll By b. Night and Day c. Words and Music 9. (Warning, this is a tonghie. ) Whose singing voice was dubbed for Lauren and Have Not? What was the song? Who was the composer? (15) I0. CA Smithsonain bonus.) Name the composition, written in honor of a famous newspaper's essay award ceremony on the grounds of the Smithsonain Institution in 1889, that came to influence • Tin Pan Alley with its martial rhythms. (Give yourself 20 points. ) ANSWERS I. (I); Jerome Kern, A1 Dubin & Harry Warren, Rodgers & Hart. 2. (c); from The Gay Divorcee; (a) The Singing Fool, (b) Broadway Melody. 3. Doris Day, "Day after Day"; Dinah Shore, "Dinah". 4. George and Ira Gershwin. 5. (c). 6. (a) The Wizard of Oz; (b) was in Going My Way; (c) in Break- fast at Tiffany's. 7. Bang Crosby, Frank Sinatra. 8. Ca) Jerome Kern, (b) Cole Porter, (c) Rodgers & Hart. 9. Andy Williams, "How Little We Know", Joagy Carmichael. I0. "The Washington Post" (John Philip Sousa). start as pluggers. Until World War I, the largest concentration of music publishing houses in the world was on both sides of a single New York block--28th Street between 5th Avenue and Broadway. This was Tin Pan Alley. Or so it came to be called around 1903, popularized by one Monroe H. Rosenfeld, song-writer, journalist, ban vivant and connoisseur of promising ponies. One historic day, the story goes, instead of visiting the racetrack, Rosenfeld went to see Harry o Van Tilzer, the most prolific "6 tunesmith of the time.._ Rosenfeld needed a title for an . article he had written about the popular music business. - Not one to waste time, Van = Tilzer, who wrote throe songs a day, began to play his 5 special piano, which had strips of newspaper woven through its strings. The result was a tinny sound. "There's my name," exclaimed In 1928, a musical tribute to Henry Ford's "Lizzie" applauded her lack of rattles and  her new "sex- appeal." Rosenfeld. "Your Kindler and was full of inventiveness and A magnetic performer, it Collins sounds exactly like a enthusiasm. His famous seemed, could sell almost any Tin Pan. I'll call my article bended-knoe delivery was the song. A banana-split of music Tin Pan Alley." result of an ingrown toenail, from Handel's "Hallelujah During a performance one Chorus". and three otbersonga night, he got down on one knee was a flop until Eddie Cantor to relieve the pressure from brought down the house in 1923 the offending toe and span- with "Yes, We Have No taneously throw out his arms Bananas." as if to embrace the audience. Far from the lights of They loved it. He kept it in the Broadway, America was act. singing on its own. By the turn Jolson put over George of the century, mass-produeod Gershwin's first hit, pianos had brought music into "Swanee," in 1919, after 70 even the most modest parlor. musicians and 60 chorus girls In 1902, a great popular dancing in the dark with composer's career began on electric lights on their shoes this note. failed to sell it. (please turn to page 9A) Tin Pan Alley. The words have a harsh sound, and in- deed, tough scraps were fought in the Alley. Pluggers competed fiercely, enticing performers with cash and gifts to get their songs before the public. A1 Jolson once received a race horse for performing a number. The conventional Alley wisdom was that if Jolson sang your song, it would be a hit. Most often it was. AI Jolson was a STAR. He TODAY'S CHUCKLE By the time a man realizes that maybe his father was right, he usually has a son who thinks he's wrong!" €IICUIATING IN:  NAIIPSNIM -- Lyres, Lyme Center, afford, Orfordvil/a, Pisrmont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, tisbon, tandaff, Benton. Lyman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . VlilMOIIT -- Thetford, Łast Thefford, Theffo_rd Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairies, West Fairies, Bradford, Bradford Vii/age, Corinth, East Cor;nth, Topshom, West Topsham, Hewhury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryegote Corner, Łast RyegOte, Sooth Ryeuote, r=eocham, Barnet, West Bsrnet. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,220 Number32 .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont A guide to *:,. rOlqllng the holiday hustle Christmas mailing and ZIP Code reserved for the Christmas and other holiday few simple suggestions: hassle-free holidays ahead, Bradford lastline, cards. Letter size standards CUSHION--Make sure McDonald is "It is also a good idea to put require that envelopes be at contents are well-cushioned by LOUISE PARKER months ago in order to enjoy and which ca you do without? to a slip of paper with the least 3v2 inches high and 5 and there is no empty space in HOYDE this Christmas season. The Giving up the usual week- their cards and recipient's name and address arrive on time and and your return address inside parcels, and be sure the ad- to shopping and dressing on the outside of the customers are parcel includes your return properly address address and ZIP Code," Packages with the McDonald says. number and Customers are also office box reminded to check the size of the city, state their envelopes before mailing inches long to be accepted for mailing. The Postal Service is also asking customers to put an ounce of extra care into preparing parcel post and other packages for mailing. Parcels will arrive at their intended destination in good shape if mailers will follow a A COLORFUL CHRISTMAS greens, purples, to your holiday blaze to brighten festive season. All is a little pow- boric acid {bright copper sulfate chloride chloride (red), lithium chloride (crimson), potassium chloride (pur- chloride (orange), baking soda (yellow orange), or ordinary table salt !that--except for the very common boric acid, baking soda, and table salt--all are either chlorides or sulfates. (Do which can be hazardous.) Any well-stocked. should be able to furnish you with a pound or so of most of the specified For those you can't locate at a pharmacy, try the nearest chemical sup- not at all dangerous to work with.., or to burn, when hen- But a few precautions are in order: Store all your prismatic fireplace in tightly sealed glass or plastic containers in a dry and well-ventilated out of the reach of both children and pets. Prepare only as much of each you need at one time, wear rubber gloves when you work, and do outdoors. Don't burn treated wood, paper, etc. until your fire has a good developed a healthy draft. And, of course, never attempt to roast other treats over such a fire, to avoid food contamination by any smoke. way to add these multiple colors to .holiday fis is by soaking wood corncobs, and other burnables in a one-to-three solution of any of the above. That is: Mix one cup of a coloring substance with three and stir the solution thoroughly until the powder has completely uid in a plastic garbage can. Then soak chunks of wood for about newspapers until they're completely saturated, and pinecones small items for five to ten minutes. Once that's done, remove the materi- coloring agent, let them drain over the garbage can, and place them on of paper. (These "drying" papers can, of course, later be rolled up and the colorful glow of your fire, you mighillke to make a few  decorations. Here's how: half-cup of kernels {but not over a fire using the decorative chemicals) the fluffy corn Is cooling--place one-half cup of light corn syrup, one-half saucepan. Cook the mixture, over me- the sugar is thoroughly dissolved, then add a few drops of red (or you pfer) food coloring and one-half teaspoon of lemon extract. Stir until and color are well spread throughout the [oey concoction, and pour eo Xture over the bowlful of popcorn. Stir agem, making sure every piece steal. Finally, working with buttered hands, ball up the coated popcorn ornaments". Wrap the finished baubles in clear cellophane, use a paper tdd a bright bow, and use them for colorful holiday decorationsl on Christmas projects or on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS • magazine, Send MORE... With LESS!, bare at this paper. Ask for Reprint No. 636: "The MI the box. Use crumpled newspaper around the item--including all sides, top and bottom. Commercially avaiiahle foam shells or air- pocket padding also make good cushioning materials. DON'T OVERWRAP--Just use your carton. Brown paper and twine cord are not necessary. Paper can rip, and twine can become entangled with processing equipment. SEAL PROPERLY--Close your parcel with one of the three recommended types of tape: pressure sensitive, nylon-reinforced kraft paper, or glass-reinforced pressure sensitive. AVOID SMUDGES--Use smudge-proof ink for your addressing. LOCATE ADDRESSES PROPERLY-- Put the recipient's address in the lower right portion of the container. Put your return address in the upper left hand corner. Remove all other labels from the box. USE ZIP CODES-- Be sure to include the ZIP Code in both the recipient's and your return address. TIME IT RIGHT-- Mail early in the month and early in the day. This will help you avoid the rush. USE THE RIGHT SER- VICE -- Irreplaceable items, cash and other valuables should be sent hy registered mail. IF YOU RUN OUT OF TIME-- Priority Mail affords First-Class handling for packages weighing over 12 ounces and up to 70 pounds. Priority Mail can be sent from any post office, station or branch or through rural carriers to any address in the U. S. Priority Mail can even be used for foreign mailings. The service is available with insurance, return receipt, COD, certificates of mailing and special delivery. Customers interested in Priority Mail should contact the post office for details. Extension Specialist, Family Resource Management University of N.H. Less than a month is left until Christmas. How can it be? The holiday was creeping up while you were still busy thinking about where to store the summer beach umbrella, how to =make the Star Wars costume your child requested for Halloween and when you should take the car in for its snow tire fitting. So whom are you comparing yourself to this year? Maybe it's your neighbor whose cards were addressed in September, whose shopping was com- pleted in October and whose cookies were baked ahead and frozen in November. She's the one who will have the spare bulbs on hand when a tree light fails and manages eaeh year to have the last strand of post-holiday tinsel picked out of the corner before yon even take down the decorations. Before you spend a lot of energy feeling guilty about your less impressive Christmas credentials, remember the number one rule of holiday management: No Comparisons. Everybody knows and envies that person who appears to have a habitual handle on the holidays. But you don't need to be accomplishing all the tasks that the "perfect planner" chooses to take on. Nor do you need to have started on them secret is setting your own standards, the ones that are both realistic and satisfying for you and your family. R's not too late to make plans for a hassle-free holiday. Where to begin? Here are a few ideas: -- Establish a holiday target. This is an important first step as it provides direction for the rest of your holiday plans. Set a dollar amount which is consistent with your current financial situation, one which will not require a large pereentage of your savings or plunge you into post-holiday debt. Once you've chosen an expense limit, decide how much to allocate to specific categories: gifts, decorations, entertainment, travel and any others that fit your situation. Then stick to it. Be con- scientious about recording holiday expenses as they occur and don't fudge more than a few dollars over your original budget. -- Make Christmas planning a family affair. Sit down together and talk about how you'll celebrate this year. Which "traditions" are musts FIREWOOD & TREE SERVICE Mixed Hardwood $70. cord. Cut, split, delivered. Bob Holly: call 222-4566 before 8:00 a.m., after 5: 00 after-Christmas ski trip may be necessary in order to finance gift-giving this year. Set priorities as a family and talk it through until com- promises are reaehed. It's helpful to use a system in looking at holiday-related tasks. Try making a family list of "to be dorms" and run each item through this set of questions: -- Why is this to be done? Decide if the task is essential in meeting family holiday goals. Could it, or parts of it, be eliminated? You might be surprised how effectively this step can shorten your list. -- Who should do it? If holiday work is still a one- person proposition, this is the year for a change. Balance the load among family members. Have the kids do the decorating and Dad take over the Christmas card list. Try (please turn to page 6A) PROFESSIONAL TYPING LEITERS - REPORTS - RESUME TECHNICAL 1YPING - THESIS LOUKE MOON BOX 409, BRADFORD, VT. 05033 222-9029 TABOR VALLEY PLAYERS PRESENTS: Treasures On Earth Dee. 3-4-5 at 8 p.m. j Town Hall--E. Topsham, Vt. TICKETS AT THE DOORI Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 i.t Your ad, this size, on page of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 Deer Skins and all wild furs. Coon, Fox, Coyote, Rats, Mink. TOP PRICES ASSURED FAIRLEE GENERAL STORE Fairlee, Vt. -- 333-9407 BRADFORD GAME ROOM VIDEO-- SUPERVISED -- PINBALL (Behind Allen's Western Auto) Monday-Friday-- 3-9 PM -- Sat. 1-9 PM December 2,191 1981 beef cook-off champ Sweet Meat Bars captured Beef Industry Council of the the first prize at the eighth National Live Stock and Meat annual National Beef Cook-Off Board, is held. each year to held recently in Sioux Falls, promote the understanding South Dakota. The creator of and preparation of the more these novel beef cookies or economical cuts of beef. Since dessert squares was Con- its beginning in 1974, the Cook- stance Beckwith of North Off has grown annually with Franklin, Connecticut. To win this year's contest drawing the prize of $1,500, Mrs. Beck- entrants from 47 states. with sandwiched a minced The 1982 National Beef meat-like filling made with Cook-Off promises to be ground beef chuck and bigger and better than ever. cranberry sauce between Prize money has been in- layers of rich cookie dough. Creased for next year's con- A salad entry, "Tarragon test. The first prize awardwill Beefsteak Salad", won second be $5,000; the second, $2,500; place and $750 for Marcia the third, $1,000 and five Dillon Whitson of Silver honorable mentions of $300 Springs, Maryland. Awarded each. To be held in San the $500 third prize was Antonio, Texas September 20- "Magic Eye of the Round," 22, 1982, it is open to all non- the entry of Carol Carroll of professional cooks. Rules Winchester, Virginia. folders, including entry forms, The National Beef Cook-Off, can be obtained from Mrs. sponsored by the American Bailey Crain, P.O. Box 245, National CowBelles and the Pearsali, Texas 78061. l 5th An?ual Workbench Christmas Bazaar ] I qkr" s :h edU7361Sc h'5L lW MR'i; ;rlV t" i / [ SANTA'S VISITING HOURS-- II AM- I rm Orange East Senior Citizens Clu00 Bradford, Vt.-- (Colatina Bakery) ff b Friday, Dec. 4th -- 10AM - 4 PM ., ff' HANDICRAFTS-- GIFTS-- BAKED GOODS  'i CHRISTMAS ITEMS -- ATTIC TREASURES ilMJ---- CHRISTMAS WREATHIqRI Sale & Luncheo SATURDAY. DEC. Methodist Church, Bradford, Vt.