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Bradford , Vermont
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December 8, 1982     Journal Opinion
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December 8, 1982
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-December 8, 12 NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, 'Inc. the Edi )Se00/on Pond...a wilderness ors to tor y, n( wm s ld tal:en its a tl toll, and by 1955 there was a the Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion We mmlp peblhed io Ik14ed, Vort. %xdpfln rels Vormnt mul New #ompsh - $9.00 pro" yee; $6.00 for six men.st out of stute - $12.00 per yeer end $7.00 for six months; Senior citizen Second ckns pestqe tmid ut BNHJfnd, Vennnt 05031. Published by Nnrtho|st Pohllshio$ Compnny, Inc., P.0. hs 31|, SnuffenJ. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher 7 K.= I Woodsville Bradford ; 802,222-5281  ..  603-747-201fi An Independent Newspaper 00-00EdJtorial Use those heaters with some thought A new safety furor has erupted in Vermont and New Hampshire swirling around the use of kerosene home space heaters. A study just completed by Yale University authorities says this week that the heaters are capable of producing high levels of sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides and other harmful gases. The report indicated that use of the heaters in an occupied structure can result in exposure to air pollutants in excess of ambient air quality stan- dards now established. The problem with the testing, kerosene association spokesmen retorted, is that nothing simulates the actual methods of use the popular heaters are now finding. They say laboratory studies are fine, but inaccurate. Tests ha,re been undertaken by a and governments. A fal consumer group estimates t as' many as S- million space heaters are now in use and many millions more are being purchased presently. The items are being used more and move by homeowners to help offset astronomical costs for home heating. The recent report by Consumer Reports Magazine was very critical of the kerosene heaters, recommending that they not he purchased because of the air pollution factor. The magazine had just completed laboratory tests and cited theirs and other laboratory sessions. The Kero-Sun Co., one of the largest manufacturers of the kerosene heaters sued the magazine, saying their testing methods were unrealistic. In Vermont, officials warned this week about the hazard of fire and possible carbon axJoxide poisoning. They recommend that rooms he ventilated to reduce pollutants in the air, and that the heaters be used in a safe area, away from flammables. In New Hampshire, the heaters were recently allowed, provided the purchaser has a permit to install the item from the local fire chief. This applies to single fnmfly dwellings only and they may not he used in apart- ment buildings. So, how does the homeowner and potential purchaser sort out all of this. conflicting information? Well, to us, the problem seems in the testing methods and that until actual use in a home is monitored a laboratory test seems illogical. And the real issue is how it is used. The Vermont energy office has issued recent guidelines for safe use of these well-received heaters, addressing the two main concerns; fire and air pollution. A smart approach to the use of these heaters would be to famih'arize yma'self .ith the unit and dide w'nether you reall X and Wan one. If it is "yes"... purchase one and use it according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Be very concerned with the following areas of trouble: fuel storage; cumbustible materials, like fur- niture, curtains, panelling; use a good grade of Number One-K kerosene. Don't substitute with the cheap stuff; never use gasoline, it will blow you out of your shoes; provide good fresh air in the room where the heater is used to.supplement your main source of heat. All appliances are dangerous. Wood stoves are Aangerous and they pollute the air. Electric heaters are dangerous and could start fires. An oil or gas fired furnace can explode. Use them wisely folks, follow directions and we bet those little kerosene heaters, if used properly, can come in handy and assist you in the heating efforts this winter. And we have been informed by a reliable source that winter may be here some day. Haverhill selectmen notes Trailer complaint lodged WOODSVILLE-- Haverhill Police Chief Stephen Savage, Woodsville Fire Chief Bruce Robbins and an Assistant State Fire Marshall inspected the grounds of the Perkim Place Property owned by Ralph Wright. It was reported to selectmen Monday Night the fire hazard situation at the Wright Property was unchanged and still potentially dangerous, according to officials. The Attorney General's Office could look into the matter, may be issuing a cease and desist order in the future, it The Mountain Laku Health Monday Night. The objection item was brought up by was made by a County road William Morrow of Mountain resident who said a trailer on Lakes District and so noted by County road was apparently Selectman Gary Woods. The inhabited by a family and no ordinance was passed into law electricity, water, or septic two weeks agn. system was evident. Selectmen, after discussing the situation, said little could be done at the town level. Selectman Gary Woods in- dicated there was a possibility that the State Water Supply and Pollution Control Ann Brockardt is honored E. CORINTH-- Ann E. Brockardt of E. Corinth, a senior at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, was recently selected to be listed in this year's Who's Who in was revealed. A written complaint iasued to selectmen was reviewed EDITOR'S NOTE ordinance was amended to American Universities and exclude plastic garbage cans Colleges. College President from the disallowed plastic Robert A. Spivey made the disposable storage bags The announcement at a senior reception Nov. 29 Contributions to cur "Letters To The Editor" should submit nane and a with your *letter. We will withhold yore/ name ff cir- cumstances warrant; lvever, we do not accept anonymous or unsigned material. Letters should be addressed to: Editor, Journal Opinion, Main street, Bradford, Vt. ff33. The honor is based on a student's academic achievement, service to the community, leadership in egtraeurricular activities and future potential. Ms. Brockardt is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Brockardt of E. Corinth. Clash of cultures Mr. Robitzer's reminiscences indicate that Peace through strength the Seyon experience involved considerable adjustment To the Editor: and the House in Illinois. The Cutler, Bridport, Vt. 05734. We among peopie of differing The writer is a member of governors of Indiana, hope that it will appear on the backgrounds. The Robitzers the American Security Louisiana, Nebraska, Nevada, ballot of every town in the arrived in Groton as outsiders, Council, which is the program North Dakota, South Dakota, State of Vermont come Town resented as such by some of constructed, but 30 years of point in ha ice and waves had taken its a treasure to be next small trickle of water Robitzer was escaping through the largest have warnings emergency sluiceway. Each problems, so he year the leakage was in- was necessary t0J creasing, but it seemed to be decision. from many small places -- After consi and would have required a variety of major reconstruction job to Robitzers were an offer from secretariat fo4; the Coalition For Peace Through Strength. The ASC and the Coalition of bipartisan Members of Congress, state legislators, organizations, and pro- defense leaders believe that only through strength can we assure both peace and freedom. The 125 national organizations (including the American Legislative Exchange Council, the American Legion Auxiliary, and the Veterans of Foreign Wars as examples) belonging to the Coalition have joined in a bipartisan effort to work for the adoption of a National Strategy of Peace Through Strength, as contained in the Peace Through Strength Resolution. This Resolution has already been passed by the Legislatures m Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, Texas, and the Territory of Guam. It has passed the Senate in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin serve as state co- chairmen of the Coalition for Peace Through Strength. The Resolution has been co- sponsored by 230 members of the U.S. House of Representatives and 48 U.S. Senators. President Reagan has endorsed the Resolution and will sign it when it has passed both Houses. While we all share a com- mon desire for peace, we believe that freezing the Three cheers for United States into a position of military inferiority to the the CIFI  Soviet Union would greatly increase the risk of war and severely limit and hamstring the negotiating capabilities of our governmental teams now working on such negotiations. We hope that you will work- in defense of America by working for the passage of the Peace Through Strength Resolution and opposing the nuclear freeze resolution. Anyone wishing to obtain a copy of the Peace Through Strength Resolution may do so by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope to Frank L. Meeting Day and the State the local people who didn't stop it. Legislature will follow the want to have changes forced Also, there was an in- lead of other right-thinking onto them, and didn't want to creasing problem with water Legislatures by approving it. It's a matter of choosing the proper course -- that of the radically-implanted fear, or that of the proper and or- dinary American way of courage, faith, and hope. Frank L. Curler Bridport, Vermont To the Editor: As parents of players on the Bradford Elementary School Soccer Team, we wish to publicly thank the coaches, Mike and Richie Claflin, for their time and effort. Approximately 40 boys and girls enjoyed the recent season. We'd like Mike and Richie to know we app|:eciate having them share their talents with our youngsters. Gratefully, The Parents Fund.misin00 appeal for Cross Roads To the Editor: Cross Roads of Bradford, Inc. is a volunteer-run, non- profit corporation organized in spring of 1982. The pr-nary purpose of Cross Roads is to provide "positive alter- natives" for Bradford area youth. Since its formation. Cross Roads has provided an "After- School Drop-In Center", two one-week Summer Camp programs, a Connecticut Valley Fair Project, (in which our float won two first prizes), and "kid-rLm" fundraising projects. Special "after- school" programs now being offered include: Santa's Workshop, gymnastics, macrame, "Kids in the Kit- chen" (a cooking class), and art. In the near future, we plan to offer a Saturday Afternoon Matinee for kids. To date, over 200 kids and volunteers  both teens and adults, including senior citizens -- have par- ticipated in Cross Roads. This is our first fundraising appeal. Our kids l/ave already raised $500 for their own give up fishing and hunting in weeds, growing in the fertile, the Seyon area. But, as Mr. shallow, muddy bottom of the Vermont to buy make a 1967 they property to the state,! Robitzer told them, he didn't pond. These Weeds not only of the come and steal milk from were unsightly, but interfered the their cows, so why should they greatly with fly fishing. Even It was a think they had the right to take though the Robitzers cleared perience to trout and deer from his out the weeds as best they beau' property? could, nobody could predict invested so Even more aggravating to whether this would become an selves -- but their local residents were some of unmanageable problem, made easier by the sportsmen who came to On another battlefront, the inserted in the hunt at Seyon who would spill Town of Groton had made a Federal over into the surrounding reappraisal of  taxable Seyon was to be forest and try to corner all the property, which assessed from deer for themselves. Although Seyon for a large number of development, so programs and we have ob- many of these paying guests potential waterfront lots, remain tained a grant through June of were Pennsylvania Dutch, the raising its taxes by 150 percent 1983 which pays the ad- same as their hosts, some of in 1967. Appeals to the tax Seyon is now ministrator's salary and some them became so un- board were unsuccessful -- Groton State Park expenses. Our projected sportsmanlike and generally and there was no telling w.hat to the public for budget for the year 1982-83 is disagreeable that the further increases there might The Robitzers $3,050 and since our programs Robitzers did not encourage be in the future. are basically free, we need them to return. your help. Your gift will help Cross Roads to continue to Movingon From the family provide its programs After 15 years at Seyon, viewpoint, Mr. and Mrs. throughout the year. Any the Robitzers had several Robitzer realized that their questions? Call 802-222-4689. problems which were own devotion to Seyon was far becoming too important to be greater than that of their two Thank you for your con- . sideration. |gnored. daughters and their son, Connie Dunlap The dam built at Seyon by whose interests were Bradford, Vt. Mr. Noyes had been well elsewhere -- so there was no with the way the been used and under The remodeled a home and are enjoying one of their projectS compilation of their of the years at Seyon, i- /- z / / \\; \\; \\; COTrAGE NEWS NOTES recently joined the staff at Cottage Hospital as dietitian. She is a native of the area and attended the Bradford schools, graduating from Bradford Academy. Her academic background includes graduating from Garland Junior College in Boston and a Bachelor of Science with honors from the University of Vermont where her degree program was foods and nutrition. here with the betterment to t all concerned. Her nutritional health hospital with personnel. She has management of department of the Her res planning the chasing of all and supervision of staff at Cottage She lived the army life for seven years and tours of duty took her to Illinois, and Schoffenburg and Nurenburg, Germany. Prior to coming to Cottage Hospital, she was the nutrition advisor for five years to the WIC program in Lebanon. " will also be in visitation and diet i to patients on an basis, the preparation of food on Wheels preparation for of the various the hospital. e 0 0 _ Bradford has two ladder trucks.* No, the fire truck parked outside Coutee's last Sunday morning was not there for a fire.., it was out on the road with three members of the Bradford Fire Department getting spfffed up and ready for on-line operation. Bradford, a town with a very good fire department now boasts TWO aerial ladder truces. Imagine that! Two ladder trucks that can reach higher than anything that will probably be built in the town for many years. The folks at the Bradford Fire Department are thinking ahead. That's why they have two ladder units. Chief Melvin Benzie said Sunday morning the truck was purchased six weeks ago out of state for a real good price, $1,000. Most rigs that size are worth at least the range of $15,000 to $20,000. The paint is faded, the chrome needs brightening, but when that new piece of apparatus goes on line in Bradford, you u,ill swear it was bought new for the town to the new truck tune of $120,000. That is a prevailing low price. We like to call this creative buying. No tax dollars are involved, just as no tax dollars were involv;ed with the purchase of their present ladder truck, which will phased out of service when the new truck pulis onto the Bradford Fire Station apron, But fire department leaders in some towns are thinking ahead, just as Benzie has done. Bruce Robbins up there in Woodsville and his crew at the fire station were thinking ahead when they purchased their ladder truck for a paltry sum a number of years ago. It sits at the ready this very moment, ready to respond to any number of towns needing their capacity. It has done this, too as part of the Twin State Fire Mutual Aid System, where the centrally located Woodsville ladder truck has been called into service on numerous occasions to either get firefighters to an above ground elevation fast, or to get a good head water aropped from the outermost tip of the ladder gun, down onto the fire. Let us say that the safe way to throw a ladder is off the bed of an aerial ladder unit. It has its own suspension system and if the walls weaken and want to fall into the fire, or if the roof gets thin and wants to drop down into the fire, all these problems are put aside when a ladder truck is in play, Bradford knows it is a safe way to fight fire and so does Woodsville. The precinct voters of Haverhill Corner raised last year a big amount of money, well over $20,000 for a new tank truck. And in North Haverhill, the men there had a new tanker built, painted it fire engine red and that is looked upon by many fire departments as a good unit to follow concerning most design features. So, most fire departments in these parts put on fundraising events, suppers, raffles and other projects to raise money, so they can take an old, long forgotten and forlon piece of fire equipment soluerich town has cast aside and turn it into something the taxpayer in these parts can be really proud of. And this service, like fighting fires, is performed nearly "at no charge. Now, that's not a bad deal... Sonia Smith, Pat Bieelow on HAVERHILL-- Sonia Smith service. Smith and Bigelow drives, and we and Pat Bigelow of Haverhill and other students will be good deal of the will be featured as part of Channel ll's Winterfest membership campaign on Thursday, Dec. 9. These students are among many who have chosen professional secretarial career training at Thomas Secretarial School in Concord. Winterfest is a celebration of special programs on Channel 11, designed to convince viewers to become supporting members of New Hampshire's public television answering pledge phones success. I during the campaign slated Haverhill area for Dec. 3 through 13. They pledges to their will be seen on Channel 11 neighbors who are during the fundraising breaks on Channel 11 on which are scheduled between 9." programs. Winterfest "Channel 11 couldn't exist includes without the efforts of volun- movies and teer groups like Thomas programs, ice' Secretarial School," com- spectaculars, mented General Manager by Dr. Leo Arthur J. Singer. "They are award-winning one of the most important programs like elements in our membership shire Journal a O'DonneU completes Germany course CHELSEA-- Spec. 4 Allen O'Donnell, son of Arthur E. and Juanita M. O'Donnell of Chelsea has completed a U.S. Army primary leadership course in Katterbach, West Germany. Jeff Page new president by JON BROOKS N. HAVERHILL-- The Little Ox-Bow 4-H Club will have a meeting Dec, 6, at North Haverhill Methodist Church. It will be followed by a Christmas party, All mem- bers attending must bring a Students received training He is a 1979 in supervisory skills, Chelsea Public leadership principles and small unit training techniques essential to a first-line supervisor in a technical or administrative environment. 'O'Donnell is a radar crewman with the 1st Armored Division in Ansbach, West Germany. Donna Clogston 00ets Uesser Vogt, daughter Mrs. Don sville has- cepted for enrollment at school in Manchester Donna is a CORINTH-- Chester V: Woodsvilie High Clogston, son of Vernon and she has been Gisela Clogston of Corinth has Future Business received a two-year U.S. Air America, Cycle Force ROTC scholarship. Farmers of gift with their age on a tag. The cadet was selected for Junior Varsity At the last meeting they had the scholarship on the basis of Field Hockey. an election of officers. Elected comprehensive tests, high Donna is for president was Jeff Page. scbool scholasticachievement in the two year Rob DeRosia was elected vice- and'extracurricular activities. Science program president. Secretary is Craig The scholarship covers full U Roy. Danny Keith is the tuition, textbooks, laboratory her studies, she will treasurer. Jon Brooks was fees and pays a monthly* Associate in elected reporter, subsistence allowance. Science Degree. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-December 8, 12 NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, 'Inc. the Edi )Se00/on Pond...a wilderness ors to tor y, n( wms ld tal:en its a tl toll, and by 1955 there was a the Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion We mmlp peblhed io Ik14ed, Vort. %xdpfln rels Vormnt mul New #ompsh - $9.00 pro" yee; $6.00 for six men.st out of stute - $12.00 per yeer end $7.00 for six months; Senior citizen Second ckns pestqe tmid ut BNHJfnd, Vennnt 05031. Published by Nnrtho|st Pohllshio$ Compnny, Inc., P.0. hs 31|, SnuffenJ. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher 7 K.= I Woodsville Bradford ; 802,222-5281  ..  603-747-201fi An Independent Newspaper 00-00EdJtorial Use those heaters with some thought A new safety furor has erupted in Vermont and New Hampshire swirling around the use of kerosene home space heaters. A study just completed by Yale University authorities says this week that the heaters are capable of producing high levels of sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides and other harmful gases. The report indicated that use of the heaters in an occupied structure can result in exposure to air pollutants in excess of ambient air quality stan- dards now established. The problem with the testing, kerosene association spokesmen retorted, is that nothing simulates the actual methods of use the popular heaters are now finding. They say laboratory studies are fine, but inaccurate. Tests ha,re been undertaken by a and governments. A fal consumer group estimates t as' many as S- million space heaters are now in use and many millions more are being purchased presently. The items are being used more and move by homeowners to help offset astronomical costs for home heating. The recent report by Consumer Reports Magazine was very critical of the kerosene heaters, recommending that they not he purchased because of the air pollution factor. The magazine had just completed laboratory tests and cited theirs and other laboratory sessions. The Kero-Sun Co., one of the largest manufacturers of the kerosene heaters sued the magazine, saying their testing methods were unrealistic. In Vermont, officials warned this week about the hazard of fire and possible carbon axJoxide poisoning. They recommend that rooms he ventilated to reduce pollutants in the air, and that the heaters be used in a safe area, away from flammables. In New Hampshire, the heaters were recently allowed, provided the purchaser has a permit to install the item from the local fire chief. This applies to single fnmfly dwellings only and they may not he used in apart- ment buildings. So, how does the homeowner and potential purchaser sort out all of this. conflicting information? Well, to us, the problem seems in the testing methods and that until actual use in a home is monitored a laboratory test seems illogical. And the real issue is how it is used. The Vermont energy office has issued recent guidelines for safe use of these well-received heaters, addressing the two main concerns; fire and air pollution. A smart approach to the use of these heaters would be to famih'arize yma'self .ith the unit and dide w'nether you reall X and Wan one. If it is "yes"... purchase one and use it according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Be very concerned with the following areas of trouble: fuel storage; cumbustible materials, like fur- niture, curtains, panelling; use a good grade of Number One-K kerosene. Don't substitute with the cheap stuff; never use gasoline, it will blow you out of your shoes; provide good fresh air in the room where the heater is used to.supplement your main source of heat. All appliances are dangerous. Wood stoves are Aangerous and they pollute the air. Electric heaters are dangerous and could start fires. An oil or gas fired furnace can explode. Use them wisely folks, follow directions and we bet those little kerosene heaters, if used properly, can come in handy and assist you in the heating efforts this winter. And we have been informed by a reliable source that winter may be here some day. Haverhill selectmen notes Trailer complaint lodged WOODSVILLE-- Haverhill Police Chief Stephen Savage, Woodsville Fire Chief Bruce Robbins and an Assistant State Fire Marshall inspected the grounds of the Perkim Place Property owned by Ralph Wright. It was reported to selectmen Monday Night the fire hazard situation at the Wright Property was unchanged and still potentially dangerous, according to officials. The Attorney General's Office could look into the matter, may be issuing a cease and desist order in the future, it The Mountain Laku Health Monday Night. The objection item was brought up by was made by a County road William Morrow of Mountain resident who said a trailer on Lakes District and so noted by County road was apparently Selectman Gary Woods. The inhabited by a family and no ordinance was passed into law electricity, water, or septic two weeks agn. system was evident. Selectmen, after discussing the situation, said little could be done at the town level. Selectman Gary Woods in- dicated there was a possibility that the State Water Supply and Pollution Control Ann Brockardt is honored E. CORINTH-- Ann E. Brockardt of E. Corinth, a senior at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, was recently selected to be listed in this year's Who's Who in was revealed. A written complaint iasued to selectmen was reviewed EDITOR'S NOTE ordinance was amended to American Universities and exclude plastic garbage cans Colleges. College President from the disallowed plastic Robert A. Spivey made the disposable storage bags The announcement at a senior reception Nov. 29 Contributions to cur "Letters To The Editor" should submit nane and a with your *letter. We will withhold yore/ name ff cir- cumstances warrant; lvever, we do not accept anonymous or unsigned material. Letters should be addressed to: Editor, Journal Opinion, Main street, Bradford, Vt. ff33. The honor is based on a student's academic achievement, service to the community, leadership in egtraeurricular activities and future potential. Ms. Brockardt is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Brockardt of E. Corinth. Clash of cultures Mr. Robitzer's reminiscences indicate that Peace through strength the Seyon experience involved considerable adjustment To the Editor: and the House in Illinois. The Cutler, Bridport, Vt. 05734. We among peopie of differing The writer is a member of governors of Indiana, hope that it will appear on the backgrounds. The Robitzers the American Security Louisiana, Nebraska, Nevada, ballot of every town in the arrived in Groton as outsiders, Council, which is the program North Dakota, South Dakota, State of Vermont come Town resented as such by some of constructed, but 30 years of point in ha ice and waves had taken its a treasure to be next small trickle of water Robitzer was escaping through the largest have warnings emergency sluiceway. Each problems, so he year the leakage was in- was necessary t0J creasing, but it seemed to be decision. from many small places -- After consi and would have required a variety of major reconstruction job to Robitzers were an offer from secretariat fo4; the Coalition For Peace Through Strength. The ASC and the Coalition of bipartisan Members of Congress, state legislators, organizations, and pro- defense leaders believe that only through strength can we assure both peace and freedom. The 125 national organizations (including the American Legislative Exchange Council, the American Legion Auxiliary, and the Veterans of Foreign Wars as examples) belonging to the Coalition have joined in a bipartisan effort to work for the adoption of a National Strategy of Peace Through Strength, as contained in the Peace Through Strength Resolution. This Resolution has already been passed by the Legislatures m Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, Texas, and the Territory of Guam. It has passed the Senate in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin serve as state co- chairmen of the Coalition for Peace Through Strength. The Resolution has been co- sponsored by 230 members of the U.S. House of Representatives and 48 U.S. Senators. President Reagan has endorsed the Resolution and will sign it when it has passed both Houses. While we all share a com- mon desire for peace, we believe that freezing the Three cheers for United States into a position of military inferiority to the the CIFI  Soviet Union would greatly increase the risk of war and severely limit and hamstring the negotiating capabilities of our governmental teams now working on such negotiations. We hope that you will work- in defense of America by working for the passage of the Peace Through Strength Resolution and opposing the nuclear freeze resolution. Anyone wishing to obtain a copy of the Peace Through Strength Resolution may do so by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope to Frank L. Meeting Day and the State the local people who didn't stop it. Legislature will follow the want to have changes forced Also, there was an in- lead of other right-thinking onto them, and didn't want to creasing problem with water Legislatures by approving it. It's a matter of choosing the proper course -- that of the radically-implanted fear, or that of the proper and or- dinary American way of courage, faith, and hope. Frank L. Curler Bridport, Vermont To the Editor: As parents of players on the Bradford Elementary School Soccer Team, we wish to publicly thank the coaches, Mike and Richie Claflin, for their time and effort. Approximately 40 boys and girls enjoyed the recent season. We'd like Mike and Richie to know we app|:eciate having them share their talents with our youngsters. Gratefully, The Parents Fund.misin00 appeal for Cross Roads To the Editor: Cross Roads of Bradford, Inc. is a volunteer-run, non- profit corporation organized in spring of 1982. The pr-nary purpose of Cross Roads is to provide "positive alter- natives" for Bradford area youth. Since its formation. Cross Roads has provided an "After- School Drop-In Center", two one-week Summer Camp programs, a Connecticut Valley Fair Project, (in which our float won two first prizes), and "kid-rLm" fundraising projects. Special "after- school" programs now being offered include: Santa's Workshop, gymnastics, macrame, "Kids in the Kit- chen" (a cooking class), and art. In the near future, we plan to offer a Saturday Afternoon Matinee for kids. To date, over 200 kids and volunteers  both teens and adults, including senior citizens -- have par- ticipated in Cross Roads. This is our first fundraising appeal. Our kids l/ave already raised $500 for their own give up fishing and hunting in weeds, growing in the fertile, the Seyon area. But, as Mr. shallow, muddy bottom of the Vermont to buy make a 1967 they property to the state,! Robitzer told them, he didn't pond. These Weeds not only of the come and steal milk from were unsightly, but interfered the their cows, so why should they greatly with fly fishing. Even It was a think they had the right to take though the Robitzers cleared perience to trout and deer from his out the weeds as best they beau' property? could, nobody could predict invested so Even more aggravating to whether this would become an selves -- but their local residents were some of unmanageable problem, made easier by the sportsmen who came to On another battlefront, the inserted in the hunt at Seyon who would spill Town of Groton had made a Federal over into the surrounding reappraisal of  taxable Seyon was to be forest and try to corner all the property, which assessed from deer for themselves. Although Seyon for a large number of development, so programs and we have ob- many of these paying guests potential waterfront lots, remain tained a grant through June of were Pennsylvania Dutch, the raising its taxes by 150 percent 1983 which pays the ad- same as their hosts, some of in 1967. Appeals to the tax Seyon is now ministrator's salary and some them became so un- board were unsuccessful -- Groton State Park expenses. Our projected sportsmanlike and generally and there was no telling w.hat to the public for budget for the year 1982-83 is disagreeable that the further increases there might The Robitzers $3,050 and since our programs Robitzers did not encourage be in the future. are basically free, we need them to return. your help. Your gift will help Cross Roads to continue to Movingon From the family provide its programs After 15 years at Seyon, viewpoint, Mr. and Mrs. throughout the year. Any the Robitzers had several Robitzer realized that their questions? Call 802-222-4689. problems which were own devotion to Seyon was far becoming too important to be greater than that of their two Thank you for your con- . sideration. |gnored. daughters and their son, Connie Dunlap The dam built at Seyon by whose interests were Bradford, Vt. Mr. Noyes had been well elsewhere -- so there was no with the way the been used and under The remodeled a home and are enjoying one of their projectS compilation of their of the years at Seyon, i- /- z / / \\; \\; \\; COTrAGE NEWS NOTES recently joined the staff at Cottage Hospital as dietitian. She is a native of the area and attended the Bradford schools, graduating from Bradford Academy. Her academic background includes graduating from Garland Junior College in Boston and a Bachelor of Science with honors from the University of Vermont where her degree program was foods and nutrition. here with the betterment to t all concerned. Her nutritional health hospital with personnel. She has management of department of the Her res planning the chasing of all and supervision of staff at Cottage She lived the army life for seven years and tours of duty took her to Illinois, and Schoffenburg and Nurenburg, Germany. Prior to coming to Cottage Hospital, she was the nutrition advisor for five years to the WIC program in Lebanon. " will also be in visitation and diet i to patients on an basis, the preparation of food on Wheels preparation for of the various the hospital. e 0 0 _ Bradford has two ladder trucks.* No, the fire truck parked outside Coutee's last Sunday morning was not there for a fire.., it was out on the road with three members of the Bradford Fire Department getting spfffed up and ready for on-line operation. Bradford, a town with a very good fire department now boasts TWO aerial ladder truces. Imagine that! Two ladder trucks that can reach higher than anything that will probably be built in the town for many years. The folks at the Bradford Fire Department are thinking ahead. That's why they have two ladder units. Chief Melvin Benzie said Sunday morning the truck was purchased six weeks ago out of state for a real good price, $1,000. Most rigs that size are worth at least the range of $15,000 to $20,000. The paint is faded, the chrome needs brightening, but when that new piece of apparatus goes on line in Bradford, you u,ill swear it was bought new for the town to the new truck tune of $120,000. That is a prevailing low price. We like to call this creative buying. No tax dollars are involved, just as no tax dollars were involv;ed with the purchase of their present ladder truck, which will phased out of service when the new truck pulis onto the Bradford Fire Station apron, But fire department leaders in some towns are thinking ahead, just as Benzie has done. Bruce Robbins up there in Woodsville and his crew at the fire station were thinking ahead when they purchased their ladder truck for a paltry sum a number of years ago. It sits at the ready this very moment, ready to respond to any number of towns needing their capacity. It has done this, too as part of the Twin State Fire Mutual Aid System, where the centrally located Woodsville ladder truck has been called into service on numerous occasions to either get firefighters to an above ground elevation fast, or to get a good head water aropped from the outermost tip of the ladder gun, down onto the fire. Let us say that the safe way to throw a ladder is off the bed of an aerial ladder unit. It has its own suspension system and if the walls weaken and want to fall into the fire, or if the roof gets thin and wants to drop down into the fire, all these problems are put aside when a ladder truck is in play, Bradford knows it is a safe way to fight fire and so does Woodsville. The precinct voters of Haverhill Corner raised last year a big amount of money, well over $20,000 for a new tank truck. And in North Haverhill, the men there had a new tanker built, painted it fire engine red and that is looked upon by many fire departments as a good unit to follow concerning most design features. So, most fire departments in these parts put on fundraising events, suppers, raffles and other projects to raise money, so they can take an old, long forgotten and forlon piece of fire equipment soluerich town has cast aside and turn it into something the taxpayer in these parts can be really proud of. And this service, like fighting fires, is performed nearly "at no charge. Now, that's not a bad deal... Sonia Smith, Pat Bieelow on HAVERHILL-- Sonia Smith service. Smith and Bigelow drives, and we and Pat Bigelow of Haverhill and other students will be good deal of the will be featured as part of Channel ll's Winterfest membership campaign on Thursday, Dec. 9. These students are among many who have chosen professional secretarial career training at Thomas Secretarial School in Concord. Winterfest is a celebration of special programs on Channel 11, designed to convince viewers to become supporting members of New Hampshire's public television answering pledge phones success. I during the campaign slated Haverhill area for Dec. 3 through 13. They pledges to their will be seen on Channel 11 neighbors who are during the fundraising breaks on Channel 11 on which are scheduled between 9." programs. Winterfest "Channel 11 couldn't exist includes without the efforts of volun- movies and teer groups like Thomas programs, ice' Secretarial School," com- spectaculars, mented General Manager by Dr. Leo Arthur J. Singer. "They are award-winning one of the most important programs like elements in our membership shire Journal a O'DonneU completes Germany course CHELSEA-- Spec. 4 Allen O'Donnell, son of Arthur E. and Juanita M. O'Donnell of Chelsea has completed a U.S. Army primary leadership course in Katterbach, West Germany. Jeff Page new president by JON BROOKS N. HAVERHILL-- The Little Ox-Bow 4-H Club will have a meeting Dec, 6, at North Haverhill Methodist Church. It will be followed by a Christmas party, All mem- bers attending must bring a Students received training He is a 1979 in supervisory skills, Chelsea Public leadership principles and small unit training techniques essential to a first-line supervisor in a technical or administrative environment. 'O'Donnell is a radar crewman with the 1st Armored Division in Ansbach, West Germany. Donna Clogston 00ets Uesser Vogt, daughter Mrs. Don sville has- cepted for enrollment at school in Manchester Donna is a CORINTH-- Chester V: Woodsvilie High Clogston, son of Vernon and she has been Gisela Clogston of Corinth has Future Business received a two-year U.S. Air America, Cycle Force ROTC scholarship. Farmers of gift with their age on a tag. The cadet was selected for Junior Varsity At the last meeting they had the scholarship on the basis of Field Hockey. an election of officers. Elected comprehensive tests, high Donna is for president was Jeff Page. scbool scholasticachievement in the two year Rob DeRosia was elected vice- and'extracurricular activities. Science program president. Secretary is Craig The scholarship covers full U Roy. Danny Keith is the tuition, textbooks, laboratory her studies, she will treasurer. Jon Brooks was fees and pays a monthly* Associate in elected reporter, subsistence allowance. Science Degree.