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Bradford , Vermont
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December 20, 1982     Journal Opinion
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December 20, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 19 Thoughts on the ut-of-Doors by Gary W. Moore It tt0000n't a good season 1982 Vermont hunting seasons resulted in 9,898 legal breaks down to 5,203 antlered deer, deer, and 782 deer taken during the bow and The 5,203 antlered deer taken represents a [ 37 percent over the previous year. It is that drop causes the concern of the public as well as the "h ajor reason for the decline was that there were fewer available for the hunter than in the previous season. In this was a planned reduction from the high population resulted from that abnormally good winter deer during that snowless winter. Food on winter deer was insufficient to feed this bumper increase in deer. they couldn't be made permanently part of the herd, removed by hunting to prevent range damage. The was at approximately the level we could conditions. e expected to stabilize the population at that level for a y, the winter of 1982 was harsher than dog predation losses of deer were above average, was common. These loses reduced the deer lower level than desired. The Department knew that had been lowered by winter kill and with a lower antlerless permit quota (down 60 1981) in April. We misjudged the severity of the and consider this the principle reason for kills in 1982. We have detected lower numbers of in this year's kill, which supports our feeling of loss. Additionally, Maine is off 20 percent and New 22 percent in their deer kill, which suggests problem in 1982. wer numbers, other factors contributing to levels that are less significant but do play a role hunter effort in both terms of numbers and some hunters not finding sufficient deer signs them stopped hunting early, a lack of snow may a deterent to some hunters who prefer snow as an '.king and locating deer. the close of the season, we contacted 35 of our outlets by telephone and found that their sales 31 percent for non-resident hunters and 11 percent hunters. The numbers are very significant as outlets account for 40 percent of our total license from my personnel around the State that in most every area they just didn't see of hunters out there that they had in previous ly has a significant impact on the number should not panic that the deer herd is lower than we it. The white-tailed deer is very prolific and will rapidly. It is my intention that we ask for no year, with the possible exception of a permits in some zones. this would also be the case for the following I don't want to mislead anyone into thinking hunting. It is a very important tool and one which I believe very strongly in. it is my policy to he very conservative in managing i future years. FALL HARVEST REPORT Last Year Lamoille--186 257 omparative Orange--436 866 410 Orleaus--194 282 885 Rutland--947 1366 459" Washington--484 730 245 Windham545 992 272 Windsor---687 1235 205 TOTALS--5203 8234 15 30 BEAR KILL UP all was bleak this fall as far as hunting goes. The bear at 319 which is up markedly from the 228 of last harvest was also good and most areas of the of the best grouse hunting in years. W L 5 0 1 0 I 0 Engineers 1 2 0 2 rough Dec. 15 Thetford 63 5,1 Thefford 47 Ville 80 Lake Region 50 82 Sunapee 34 Whitcomb 32 67 Woodsville 60 Mascoma 54 page 18 fell in on the Playing without starters, Oxbow up six unanswered all on turnovers A technical possession put for the first two and a half remaining. Charlie the score on a up and then Scott ying well in a sunk a short Ying the score once 51-51 with a minute Oxbow's balanced Were veteran Charlie Randy Huntington, 14 Charlie a strong chipped in with 11 lowed by Mark field goals center contributed six I the winning effort. lg-wise Oxbow on 22 of 66 field and 12 of 21 ke line. Mascoma to can 23 of 62 field andonly 8 of 17 ETBALL RESULTS As of Dec. 15 iity In Memorbzm Division of 68501 WALT OSC,(OD One of the all-time great woodsmen passed away last week. The man had more knowledge of the Vermont woods than I can ever hope to acquire. Every young man has a hero and Walt Osgood was mine. He represented all the great outdoorsmen that young men read about. To me he was Daniel Boone, Davey Crocket and Natty Bumbo in the flesh• As Walt and dad worked together, I came in contact with Walt very often. I remember many times listening to his tales while waiting for dad to get done work. Some of my earliest memories of hunting and fishing were things that dad related to me from what Walt had told him. I remember how I felt that I had truly come of age when I was allowed to go on my first of many trips with dad and Walt. Listening to him while .sitting in camp was like sitting at the feet of the master• It was Walt who first led me into such exotic places as: South America Pond, The Black Branch and Unknown Pond. I fondly remember rabbit hunting at Newark Pond and fishing on The Madison Brook, all with Walt and dad. I remember bouncing along in the back of his Scout with my brother, Rick while Walt and dad kept our rapt attention with man talk. One of my best memories is of being carried across the icy Nulhegan River on WaR's shoulders while heading to camp for some rabbit hunting. Like so many who learned so much from Walt, I will always have him on my mind as I return again and again to those places first visited with him. As my brothers and I grew up we often had questions and arguments about the outdoors and hunting and fishing. Dad would always end any argument with the simple, "Walt says." Who could question? I have often wondered if Walt said all the things he was supposed to or if dad just liked to win arguments. EXCUSES I intend to get back into the swing of writing again with this column. My intentions have been good, but the time never seemed to come. Today is my first day off since the middle of October and the last month was especially busy with the deer season being on. I never did hunt with my bow, nor did I hunt partridge. My deer hunting was limited to one and a half hours opening day. It seems like with my job that there is never time to do "it" as so many organizations want me to talk about "it". Speaking engagements always seem to conflict with hunting and fishing. NATIONAL CHRISTMAS TREE Readers watching the national news Wednesday night will see the nation's Christmas tree being lighted in front of the capitol. The tree came from Fish and Game land in Rochester and was cut by Governo?'nelling last weekend. The tree is a balsam fir, 35 years-old and 50 feet tall. I was in Washington for meetings three days last week and stopped by the capitol to see the tree after it was decorated. The crew working on it said that it was the best looking tree that they had seen in years. NEED A GIFT? A gift certificate for a hunting or fishing license would he a welcome present for any sportsman. The certificates are available from license agents in Vermont and New Hamp- shire. BOY'S BMU BASKETBALL SCHEDULE BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Dec. 15 Thefford + Dee. 17 Xmas Tourney Dec. 18 Xmas Tourney Dec. 21 at Chelsea + Jan• 7 at Danville + Jan. 8 Williamstown + Jan. 11 Woodsville + Jan. 14 Chelsea + Jan• 19 Twinfield + CIRCLING AROUND TO GET INTO SHOOTING POSITION is BMU's Betty Bogie. Bogie was high point scorer for the Bucks in their victory over S. Royalton. LAYING IT UP FOR TWO MORE is Ortord's Bill Baker in game against Moultonboro. Baker scortl 7 points as a starting forward in Orford's 86-35 win. Jan. 21 at Woodsville + Jan. 25 at Lisbon Jan. 26 at S. Royalton + Feb. 1 Lin-Wood + Feb. 4 Lisbon Feb. II S. Royalton + Feb. 12 at Williamstown + Feb. 15 at Twinfield + Feb. 18 at LinWood + Feb. 21 Danville + Feb. 25 at Thefford + + Denotes JV games at 6:00 Varsity games at 7:30 except Tournament and Lisbon games at 7:00 p.m. BMU GIRLS BASKETBALL Dec. 13 Twinfield + Dec. 14 at Thefford + Dec. 20 at Danville + Dec. 23 at Williamstown + Dec. 27 Xmas Tourney Dec. 28 Xmas Tourney Jan. 4 Danville + Jan. 6 at S. Royaltea + Jan. 7 Chelsea + Jan. 13 Lyndon Institute + Jan. 15 Williamstown + Jan. 20 at Woodsville + Jan. 25 at Lisbon Jan. 27 at Chelsea + Feb. 1 at Lyndon Inst. + Feb. 4 Lisbon Feb. 5 at Twinfield + Feb. I0 Thetford + + Denotes JV games at 6:00 Varsity games at 7:30 except Tournament at 7:00 p.m. and Lisbon at 5:30 p.m. INTERESTING FACT Young rabbits are known as kits or kittens. W(mdsviHe 'lose' at five Thetford tops BMU; Oxbow wins a00ain THETFORD-- The Thetford 42-26 on the winner's court. Panthers continued on a tear, Twinfield was held to just a winning two games this past free throw in the first quarter week, including a 56-35 victory and scored only nine during over previously unbeaten Blue the first half, falling behind 23- Mountain. Center Lyn Hill 9 against the aggressive stayed on a hot streak, Bucks. pouring in 28 and 29 points The Buck defense took respectively. The Oxbow advantage of poor Twitffield Olympians pulled a surprise shooting all night, opening up victory, taking the measure of a comfortable 15 point lead Division II Champions in 1982, and coasted to victory. Betty St. Johnsbury, on a shot by Bogie hit for 19 points, in- Matt Dobbins, 55-53. A 19-3 cluding seven from the stripe. foul shot advantage helped Connie Bixby turned in a pave the way to victory, strong floor game and added Blue Mountain meanwhile, ten points to the Buck total, found the rest of the week to followed by Stevens with their liking, beating Wood- eight. sville and Twinfield, making it Blue Mountain proved to be three wins and no losses poor hosts to Woodsville as before the Thetford game. they bested their rival by a Betty Bogie and Nancy score of 55-38, outscoring the Stevens continue to impress struggling Engineers at every for the Bucks. The Orford turn. Coach Bandy threw a full Wildcats split two games, court press against the moving their record to 2-2. Woodsville five and found Bob Thatcher's troops had success almost immediately, trouble finding the hoop against Sunapee then put on a racing to a 16-8 first quarter 10-4 lead in the first eight lead. The pressure continued minutes. At the half, Wood- in the second quarter with the sville still held a slim one point Bucks converting numerous advantage, 17-16. Engineer turnovers into The final half wasn't kind to points. At the half, BMU led the Engineers. Plymouth outscored Woodsville by identical 13-8 margins to come away with a nine point win. 29-15. WoodsviUe got its act together somewhat in the final half, putting together 23 points with Greta Briggerman and Sandy Boyce finding the range, but to no avail. Bogie hit for 21 points for BMU aided by ten points each from Nuet Welles and Nancy Stevens• Plymouth 42, Woodsviile 33 WOODSVILLE-- For the first time this season the Wood- sville Engineers could see light at the end of the tunnel, s*arting strong before falling to a taller and more ex- perienced Plymouth team 42- 33. The Engineers, looking for their first win after four losses, started with aggressive play, building up a Briggerman, leaving the game during the final quarter with an injury, still managed to lead Woodsville with 10 points, followed by Lacey with nine and Boyce with eight, Orford 44, Whitcomb 39 Sunapee 5l, Orford 39 (please-turn to page 8) |||nml|m|nm|mm|mmmnm|m| 00VACUUM CLEANER 14 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE Cell J0e DePalo 1-603-448-3787 SAtFS a SERV,Ct BOS a soPpt ,ES. l iIliali milillilillil m n i mlmillilin im m i n Ill a TOLL HOUSE BREAD strong second half to out- distanceWhitcomb. IS NOW BAKING Woodsville Engineers continued their slump, coming up empty in two tries. The Engineers, already hurting STOLLEN physically, lost another player, Greta Briggerman against Plymouth. Now that [ most of their firing power is on II the bench (Trish Demers with a broken nose) it could be some time before the SOUTH NEWBURY Engineers break into the win column. VERMONT Thetford 44, Danville 42 Thetford 56, BMU 35 DANVILLE-- The Thetford Panthers scraped their way back from a ten point third quarter deficit 36-26, to take victory out of the grasp of the Danville Indians. Lyn Hill's jumper with a minute left in the game turned out to be the game winner against the foul laden Danville team. The Panthers fell behind during the first quarter 18-10 and made up little ground by the half, 23-16. The scrappy Indians, looking for their first win built up a 36-26 third quarter lead, before suc- cumbing. In the final eight minutes, however, it was all Thetford. While the Indians couldn't buy a hoop, and losing three starters to fouls, Thetford could do Little wrong, finally tying the score on a basket by Holly Tallman, her only score of the game. Hill led all scorers with 28, Julie Tallman and Karen Jacobs adding four each along with Kim Wolstenhone with four also. Win number three came at the expense of previously unbeaten Blue Mountain. The CHRISTMAS Panthers played a sticky first half defense against the tense Bucks, moving into an 18-12 lead. The turning point of the game was in the third quarter as the Panther offense was in high gear scoring 20 points to only 11 for Blue Mountain. The fourth quarter was academic as Thetford won going away, 56-35. Lyn Hill was again the big gun, pouring in 29 points on 11 field goals and seven foul shots. Annie Fetter also hit for double figures at 15 and Karen Jacobs added nine. Bettie Bogie continued toplay well at both ends of the court for the Bucks, coming up with 13 points. Connie Bixby and Nuet Welles chipped in with six each in the losing cause. BMU 55, Woodsville 38 BMU 42, Twinfield 26 WELLS RIVER-- Keep an eye out for the BMU Bucks. They were runner-ups in the 1982 playdowns, and Arnold Bandy just may have another winner on the horizon. The fire-power of Nancy Stevens and Betty Bogie led the Bucks past an outmanned Twinfield squad Centerpiece .Specials Greens, Red Berries and White Poms Greens, Berries, Arff.0000al Fruit, Poms and a Candle (EleRant) WE DELIVER! Featuring the Teleflora . "Baking Dish Bouquet" $7.95 $9.95 l00k41om WE WIRE FLOWERS ANYWHERE I Call 603-989-5541 u • 802-866-5594 on all 20% OFF Steel TIEMPO & ARRIVA Radials in Stock GOOafPEAa Shn And Save Now The Original ml Ramal ALWAYS AUTOMOTIVE FREE MOUNTING aoon),'00'zAn SPECIALS YOUR CHOICE =16.95 , Front End Alignment . Lube, Oil & Filter . Antifreeze ChanRe New Antifreeze, Insoect all Belts & Hoses WINTER TIRE =33 Ize 15580D13 blackwall, plus Fvr 8o B78-13 C78-14 D78-14 E78-14+ wallable at comparable prices 60-Month---00 I ,,...,,,.,, __,__ [ srttt from uarantee 4//q= I'I S Monroe [[ dd .nt,00 =;,.,.,. I snows • X"  0R0SS  "X" OOUNTRY . % SIGN UP . . FOR GROUP LESSONSII * llID I au I lllii HI III Hill ill | Spooial Holiday Rate| Dec. 29-30-31 n At 10 AM And At 1 PM $4.00 Per Person 1 Hour Lesson e L............-.....l @ * @ : River Bend ** Cross Country Ski * Shop @ ROUTE S 802-000000-S9200 SO. Na0000URY00 @ @ @ * * @ * * December 20, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 19 Thoughts on the ut-of-Doors by Gary W. Moore It tt0000n't a good season 1982 Vermont hunting seasons resulted in 9,898 legal breaks down to 5,203 antlered deer, deer, and 782 deer taken during the bow and The 5,203 antlered deer taken represents a [ 37 percent over the previous year. It is that drop causes the concern of the public as well as the "h ajor reason for the decline was that there were fewer available for the hunter than in the previous season. In this was a planned reduction from the high population resulted from that abnormally good winter deer during that snowless winter. Food on winter deer was insufficient to feed this bumper increase in deer. they couldn't be made permanently part of the herd, removed by hunting to prevent range damage. The was at approximately the level we could conditions. e expected to stabilize the population at that level for a y, the winter of 1982 was harsher than dog predation losses of deer were above average, was common. These loses reduced the deer lower level than desired. The Department knew that had been lowered by winter kill and with a lower antlerless permit quota (down 60 1981) in April. We misjudged the severity of the and consider this the principle reason for kills in 1982. We have detected lower numbers of in this year's kill, which supports our feeling of loss. Additionally, Maine is off 20 percent and New 22 percent in their deer kill, which suggests problem in 1982. wer numbers, other factors contributing to levels that are less significant but do play a role hunter effort in both terms of numbers and some hunters not finding sufficient deer signs them stopped hunting early, a lack of snow may a deterent to some hunters who prefer snow as an '.king and locating deer. the close of the season, we contacted 35 of our outlets by telephone and found that their sales 31 percent for non-resident hunters and 11 percent hunters. The numbers are very significant as outlets account for 40 percent of our total license from my personnel around the State that in most every area they just didn't see of hunters out there that they had in previous ly has a significant impact on the number should not panic that the deer herd is lower than we it. The white-tailed deer is very prolific and will rapidly. It is my intention that we ask for no year, with the possible exception of a permits in some zones. this would also be the case for the following I don't want to mislead anyone into thinking hunting. It is a very important tool and one which I believe very strongly in. it is my policy to he very conservative in managing i future years. FALL HARVEST REPORT Last Year Lamoille--186 257 omparative Orange--436 866 410 Orleaus--194 282 885 Rutland--947 1366 459" Washington--484 730 245 Windham545 992 272 Windsor---687 1235 205 TOTALS--5203 8234 15 30 BEAR KILL UP all was bleak this fall as far as hunting goes. The bear at 319 which is up markedly from the 228 of last harvest was also good and most areas of the of the best grouse hunting in years. W L 5 0 1 0 I 0 Engineers 1 2 0 2 rough Dec. 15 Thetford 63 5,1 Thefford 47 Ville 80 Lake Region 50 82 Sunapee 34 Whitcomb 32 67 Woodsville 60 Mascoma 54 page 18 fell in on the Playing without starters, Oxbow up six unanswered all on turnovers A technical possession put for the first two and a half remaining. Charlie the score on a up and then Scott ying well in a sunk a short Ying the score once 51-51 with a minute Oxbow's balanced Were veteran Charlie Randy Huntington, 14 Charlie a strong chipped in with 11 lowed by Mark field goals center contributed six I the winning effort. lg-wise Oxbow on 22 of 66 field and 12 of 21 ke line. Mascoma to can 23 of 62 field andonly 8 of 17 ETBALL RESULTS As of Dec. 15 iity In Memorbzm Division of 68501 WALT OSC,(OD One of the all-time great woodsmen passed away last week. The man had more knowledge of the Vermont woods than I can ever hope to acquire. Every young man has a hero and Walt Osgood was mine. He represented all the great outdoorsmen that young men read about. To me he was Daniel Boone, Davey Crocket and Natty Bumbo in the flesh• As Walt and dad worked together, I came in contact with Walt very often. I remember many times listening to his tales while waiting for dad to get done work. Some of my earliest memories of hunting and fishing were things that dad related to me from what Walt had told him. I remember how I felt that I had truly come of age when I was allowed to go on my first of many trips with dad and Walt. Listening to him while .sitting in camp was like sitting at the feet of the master• It was Walt who first led me into such exotic places as: South America Pond, The Black Branch and Unknown Pond. I fondly remember rabbit hunting at Newark Pond and fishing on The Madison Brook, all with Walt and dad. I remember bouncing along in the back of his Scout with my brother, Rick while Walt and dad kept our rapt attention with man talk. One of my best memories is of being carried across the icy Nulhegan River on WaR's shoulders while heading to camp for some rabbit hunting. Like so many who learned so much from Walt, I will always have him on my mind as I return again and again to those places first visited with him. As my brothers and I grew up we often had questions and arguments about the outdoors and hunting and fishing. Dad would always end any argument with the simple, "Walt says." Who could question? I have often wondered if Walt said all the things he was supposed to or if dad just liked to win arguments. EXCUSES I intend to get back into the swing of writing again with this column. My intentions have been good, but the time never seemed to come. Today is my first day off since the middle of October and the last month was especially busy with the deer season being on. I never did hunt with my bow, nor did I hunt partridge. My deer hunting was limited to one and a half hours opening day. It seems like with my job that there is never time to do "it" as so many organizations want me to talk about "it". Speaking engagements always seem to conflict with hunting and fishing. NATIONAL CHRISTMAS TREE Readers watching the national news Wednesday night will see the nation's Christmas tree being lighted in front of the capitol. The tree came from Fish and Game land in Rochester and was cut by Governo?'nelling last weekend. The tree is a balsam fir, 35 years-old and 50 feet tall. I was in Washington for meetings three days last week and stopped by the capitol to see the tree after it was decorated. The crew working on it said that it was the best looking tree that they had seen in years. NEED A GIFT? A gift certificate for a hunting or fishing license would he a welcome present for any sportsman. The certificates are available from license agents in Vermont and New Hamp- shire. BOY'S BMU BASKETBALL SCHEDULE BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Dec. 15 Thefford + Dee. 17 Xmas Tourney Dec. 18 Xmas Tourney Dec. 21 at Chelsea + Jan• 7 at Danville + Jan. 8 Williamstown + Jan. 11 Woodsville + Jan. 14 Chelsea + Jan• 19 Twinfield + CIRCLING AROUND TO GET INTO SHOOTING POSITION is BMU's Betty Bogie. Bogie was high point scorer for the Bucks in their victory over S. Royalton. LAYING IT UP FOR TWO MORE is Ortord's Bill Baker in game against Moultonboro. Baker scortl 7 points as a starting forward in Orford's 86-35 win. Jan. 21 at Woodsville + Jan. 25 at Lisbon Jan. 26 at S. Royalton + Feb. 1 Lin-Wood + Feb. 4 Lisbon Feb. II S. Royalton + Feb. 12 at Williamstown + Feb. 15 at Twinfield + Feb. 18 at LinWood + Feb. 21 Danville + Feb. 25 at Thefford + + Denotes JV games at 6:00 Varsity games at 7:30 except Tournament and Lisbon games at 7:00 p.m. BMU GIRLS BASKETBALL Dec. 13 Twinfield + Dec. 14 at Thefford + Dec. 20 at Danville + Dec. 23 at Williamstown + Dec. 27 Xmas Tourney Dec. 28 Xmas Tourney Jan. 4 Danville + Jan. 6 at S. Royaltea + Jan. 7 Chelsea + Jan. 13 Lyndon Institute + Jan. 15 Williamstown + Jan. 20 at Woodsville + Jan. 25 at Lisbon Jan. 27 at Chelsea + Feb. 1 at Lyndon Inst. + Feb. 4 Lisbon Feb. 5 at Twinfield + Feb. I0 Thetford + + Denotes JV games at 6:00 Varsity games at 7:30 except Tournament at 7:00 p.m. and Lisbon at 5:30 p.m. INTERESTING FACT Young rabbits are known as kits or kittens. W(mdsviHe 'lose' at five Thetford tops BMU; Oxbow wins a00ain THETFORD-- The Thetford 42-26 on the winner's court. Panthers continued on a tear, Twinfield was held to just a winning two games this past free throw in the first quarter week, including a 56-35 victory and scored only nine during over previously unbeaten Blue the first half, falling behind 23- Mountain. Center Lyn Hill 9 against the aggressive stayed on a hot streak, Bucks. pouring in 28 and 29 points The Buck defense took respectively. The Oxbow advantage of poor Twitffield Olympians pulled a surprise shooting all night, opening up victory, taking the measure of a comfortable 15 point lead Division II Champions in 1982, and coasted to victory. Betty St. Johnsbury, on a shot by Bogie hit for 19 points, in- Matt Dobbins, 55-53. A 19-3 cluding seven from the stripe. foul shot advantage helped Connie Bixby turned in a pave the way to victory, strong floor game and added Blue Mountain meanwhile, ten points to the Buck total, found the rest of the week to followed by Stevens with their liking, beating Wood- eight. sville and Twinfield, making it Blue Mountain proved to be three wins and no losses poor hosts to Woodsville as before the Thetford game. they bested their rival by a Betty Bogie and Nancy score of 55-38, outscoring the Stevens continue to impress struggling Engineers at every for the Bucks. The Orford turn. Coach Bandy threw a full Wildcats split two games, court press against the moving their record to 2-2. Woodsville five and found Bob Thatcher's troops had success almost immediately, trouble finding the hoop against Sunapee then put on a racing to a 16-8 first quarter 10-4 lead in the first eight lead. The pressure continued minutes. At the half, Wood- in the second quarter with the sville still held a slim one point Bucks converting numerous advantage, 17-16. Engineer turnovers into The final half wasn't kind to points. At the half, BMU led the Engineers. Plymouth outscored Woodsville by identical 13-8 margins to come away with a nine point win. 29-15. WoodsviUe got its act together somewhat in the final half, putting together 23 points with Greta Briggerman and Sandy Boyce finding the range, but to no avail. Bogie hit for 21 points for BMU aided by ten points each from Nuet Welles and Nancy Stevens• Plymouth 42, Woodsviile 33 WOODSVILLE-- For the first time this season the Wood- sville Engineers could see light at the end of the tunnel, s*arting strong before falling to a taller and more ex- perienced Plymouth team 42- 33. The Engineers, looking for their first win after four losses, started with aggressive play, building up a Briggerman, leaving the game during the final quarter with an injury, still managed to lead Woodsville with 10 points, followed by Lacey with nine and Boyce with eight, Orford 44, Whitcomb 39 Sunapee 5l, Orford 39 (please-turn to page 8) |||nml|m|nm|mm|mmmnm|m| 00VACUUM CLEANER 14 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE Cell J0e DePalo 1-603-448-3787 SAtFS a SERV,Ct BOS a soPpt ,ES. l iIliali milillilillil m n i mlmillilin im m i n Ill a TOLL HOUSE BREAD strong second half to out- distanceWhitcomb. IS NOW BAKING Woodsville Engineers continued their slump, coming up empty in two tries. The Engineers, already hurting STOLLEN physically, lost another player, Greta Briggerman against Plymouth. Now that [ most of their firing power is on II the bench (Trish Demers with a broken nose) it could be some time before the SOUTH NEWBURY Engineers break into the win column. VERMONT Thetford 44, Danville 42 Thetford 56, BMU 35 DANVILLE-- The Thetford Panthers scraped their way back from a ten point third quarter deficit 36-26, to take victory out of the grasp of the Danville Indians. Lyn Hill's jumper with a minute left in the game turned out to be the game winner against the foul laden Danville team. The Panthers fell behind during the first quarter 18-10 and made up little ground by the half, 23-16. The scrappy Indians, looking for their first win built up a 36-26 third quarter lead, before suc- cumbing. In the final eight minutes, however, it was all Thetford. While the Indians couldn't buy a hoop, and losing three starters to fouls, Thetford could do Little wrong, finally tying the score on a basket by Holly Tallman, her only score of the game. Hill led all scorers with 28, Julie Tallman and Karen Jacobs adding four each along with Kim Wolstenhone with four also. Win number three came at the expense of previously unbeaten Blue Mountain. The CHRISTMAS Panthers played a sticky first half defense against the tense Bucks, moving into an 18-12 lead. The turning point of the game was in the third quarter as the Panther offense was in high gear scoring 20 points to only 11 for Blue Mountain. The fourth quarter was academic as Thetford won going away, 56-35. Lyn Hill was again the big gun, pouring in 29 points on 11 field goals and seven foul shots. Annie Fetter also hit for double figures at 15 and Karen Jacobs added nine. Bettie Bogie continued toplay well at both ends of the court for the Bucks, coming up with 13 points. Connie Bixby and Nuet Welles chipped in with six each in the losing cause. BMU 55, Woodsville 38 BMU 42, Twinfield 26 WELLS RIVER-- Keep an eye out for the BMU Bucks. They were runner-ups in the 1982 playdowns, and Arnold Bandy just may have another winner on the horizon. The fire-power of Nancy Stevens and Betty Bogie led the Bucks past an outmanned Twinfield squad Centerpiece .Specials Greens, Red Berries and White Poms Greens, Berries, Arff.0000al Fruit, Poms and a Candle (EleRant) WE DELIVER! Featuring the Teleflora . "Baking Dish Bouquet" $7.95 $9.95 l00k41om WE WIRE FLOWERS ANYWHERE I Call 603-989-5541 u • 802-866-5594 on all 20% OFF Steel TIEMPO & ARRIVA Radials in Stock GOOafPEAa Shn And Save Now The Original ml Ramal ALWAYS AUTOMOTIVE FREE MOUNTING aoon),'00'zAn SPECIALS YOUR CHOICE =16.95 , Front End Alignment . Lube, Oil & Filter . Antifreeze ChanRe New Antifreeze, Insoect all Belts & Hoses WINTER TIRE =33 Ize 15580D13 blackwall, plus Fvr 8o B78-13 C78-14 D78-14 E78-14+ wallable at comparable prices 60-Month---00 I ,,...,,,.,, __,__ [ srttt from uarantee 4//q= I'I S Monroe [[ dd .nt,00 =;,.,.,. I snows • X"  0R0SS  "X" OOUNTRY . % SIGN UP . . FOR GROUP LESSONSII * llID I au I lllii HI III Hill ill | Spooial Holiday Rate| Dec. 29-30-31 n At 10 AM And At 1 PM $4.00 Per Person 1 Hour Lesson e L............-.....l @ * @ : River Bend ** Cross Country Ski * Shop @ ROUTE S 802-000000-S9200 SO. Na0000URY00 @ @ @ * * @ * *