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December 30, 1981     Journal Opinion
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'4 116, Number 52 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshmre and Vermont December 30, 1981 "A history" buff in the middle of history" The day the army took over Poland by BRUCE MacLEAN Sunday, Dec. 13th 8:30 A.M. -- "I left the apartment and went out for a morning run. I didn't get I00 yards from my building when I ran into soldiers. At first I didn't think that much of it. In the past couple of months there have been periodic situations where soldiers have taken to the streets as a show of force and as a warning to the general public. However my view on the subject soon changed as I continued on my way. Soldiers were on every street corner and in full battle dress including AK-47s with bayonets attached, slung casually over their shoulders. "What really convinced me that something unusual was going on was the sight of ar- mored personal carriers parked at strategic in- tersections. When I got back to the apartment I tried calling a Polish friend to see if he had sorr news of the situation. I couldn't reach him as my phone was dead. I was soon to find out that all phones had been cut throughout the whole of Poland. 10:30-12:30 -- "I took my camera and spent the rest of the morning driving around Warsaw to try and determine the extent of the Military presence in the city. It was total. I was con- stantly being stopped by soldiers and re-routed. The soldiers appeared very friendly and were mostly 18 to 19 year old draftees who ap- peared to be as bewildered with what was on as the branch of Solidarity to see if anything was going on. There was a large group of people outside the building just waiting to pick up any news that may have come from Solidarity headquarters in Gdansk. One of the Solidarity officials there told me that the militia had raided the building at 11:30 the night before. It was exactly that time that the Polish Army had announced that Martial Law was now in effect. Cars going by the Solidarity building stopped and were handed leaflets by officials telling them what Solidarity had been able to learn up to that point. From there 1 drove past the American Embassy. All the gates were locked and the inside of the compound was being patrolled by Marine Guards. 1:30 P.M. "I left the apartment again and took a short walk over to the ABC News Bureau. I talked to the Bureau Chief who explained his frustration of having the biggest news story of the year to come out of Poland and not being able to get it out of the country. As I said before all phones had been cut. No telex was allowed either. All borders had been sealed and all airports shut down. Camera crews were forbidden to go out and film anything. What really upset him though was that he had heard that the Associated Press and Reuters were allowed to get their in- formation out. 2:00 P.M. -- "I leit the news bureau Militia carrying very long night sticks. Where as many Poles respect the army and see it as one of the few non- corrupt institutions left in Poland, they despise the Militia who they see as a symbol of the hated regime. "When I got to my friend's apartment, his family was gathered around the television. The regular an- nouncers were replaced by men in Military uniform. They were reading a long list of new regulations just announced by the new military council that was now running Poland. The Military had declared a 'State of War' on its own people. "Among the new regulations stated by the military were the following: --"All hunting rifles must be turned into the Police within 24 hours. -- "All personal liberties and civil liberties had been revoked. -- "Police may enter and Profae search any person's apart- ment T- including foreigners -- without any notice or prior warning. - "All persons from age 13 and on up must carry their documents with them at all times and anyone refusing to go into the Armed Forces, if called upon, can and will be punished by death. "My friend's mother who was with the family at the time, a very well known person in Poland who survived internment in Auschwitz -- one of many non-Jewish Poles to be sent there by the Nazis -- commented that Saturday night would go down in History in Poland as the last night Poles were free to speak on any subject they wanted. 3:30 P.M. -- "I walked back to Solidarity headquarters once again to see if anything new had developed. Again, there was a large crowd around the building. A Solidarity officiil came out and announced an open-ended General Strike throughout Poland, starting Monday at 9:00 in the mor- ning. There was wild applause from the crowd upon hearing this announcement. 4:00 P.M. -- "Back in the apartment l heard the BBC World Service News and not surprisingly devoted it's whole newscast to the situation in Poland. They were unable to receive any news from their correspon- dent based in Warsaw and consequently had to settle for monitoring Radio dispatches from Radio Poland for their information. 5:00 P.M. -- "The school principal came to my apartment to inform me that school had been cancelled Monday and possibly Tuesday as well. Tiffs course of action was necessary because Tele- communications was cut off (please-turn to page i I ) MacLean in Poland: on leave from Oxlmw high BRADFORD-- Bruce MacLean, the man behind this week's rather unique account in the Journal Opinion of life in Poland following a military take-over and information blackout by the Polish government, is currently living in Warsaw on a two- ,ear }cave oi ahsense from the New Year's, of redhea,00 s! -- "1 dropped by the about a mile away. the Bradford: headquarters of the Warsaw way I encountered scores of MacLean and his British wife Margaret, arrived in Poland one year ago to teach Warsaw after spending 1980 Orford lunch program needs at the American School in teaching at the American lower costs higher budget School inSophia, Bulgaria-- another Soviet block country. Smithsonian News Service Art couesy of Business Americana Collection.  [ Prior to his two-year stay at National Museum of American History ORFORD--Orford school school board that high food the price of the lunch that is I Oxbow High School beginning provided; serving a breakfast I in 1979, the MacLeans had also meal instead of a" lunch; or taught school in such varied board members met last week to discuss their next move regarding their school lunch program -- a program that is expecting to come up with a $4,000 to $5,000 deficit at the end of this school year. Under a federal subsidy program requirement, a during the school is required to serve two the hostess ounces of meat or meat MAN the door would portend bad would marry luck. Homeowners even got in following year, costs "must be reduced" and student participation in the lunch program increased if the Orford lunch program is to survive financially. School officials say that the alternative to the program -- no program, is an alternative they would prefer to avoid. A spokesman for the New Hampshire lunch program said that approximately 20 schools in the state have applied for and received waivers from the federally subsidized program. However, the spokesman said that these schools were substantially smaller thanthe Orford schools. A school with a waiver is not required to follow the state and federal school meal requirements. Less Food The Orford school board has been considering a variety of changes in the program that are designed to cut costs. Among these ideas have been: increases in appropriations from the school district; serving less food; increasing quaffing your last the habit of paying dark- dropped her wedding ring into substitute, two ounces of the New Year, beating haired men to be there early, the pot of hot spiced milk and substance from a fruit and pondering A Russian custom would wine, and the singles tried to vegetable group and one half- most important have required that you beat pick up the ring. with each pint of milk per pupil on a well ask the corners of your house with ladleful of the beverage. If a daily basis--plus eight ser- "What's all the fuss sticks to drive out Satan guest succeeded, it was a sure vings of bread per week. ' around the new year. You omen that he would wed that Orford's dilemma is finding be reassured; could try that today if you can year. a way to meet those before you have ignore the gape-mouthed Gift giving, visiting friends, requirements while keeping same to-do.., and stares of your neighbors, driving out evil and foretelling the cost of the program at an How about "wassailing" events of the coming year ai'e affordable level. School lunch in old England, your apple tree, as British but a few New Year's customs programs have been said to be Imve gathered farmers were wont to do, by that have been carried on hard hit by federal cut-backs sacred trees to sprinkling it with cider and through the ages. New Year's in lunch reimbursement gifts, singing a song for a good crop is one holiday that just about programs along with rising might have gone in the coming year? Just tell everyone around the world, food prices and declining " in Scotland. the quickly ga.thering crowd Westerners and Easterners, budgets. midnight church that it's an old family custom, celebrate in some fashion on Cut Costs Scottish homes were If you were a king in ancient some set date, says Shirley William Moorman, director visitors, and it was Babylon, you would have been Cherkasky, who has of accounting for the schools a family's luck for stripped of your royal robe, researched holiday inOrford, Lyme, Norwichand t, would depend on who made to kneel and then celebrations for the Hanover reportedly told the solemnly boxed on the ears Smithsonian's Division of Would have going through the process.of obtaining a waiver. In order to obtain a waiver, such a decision must first be approved by the voters at their March school district meeting. parts of the globe as Aber- deen, Scotland and at the American School in Moscow, capital city of the Soviet 1982 Town of Haverhill budget commiuee named WOODSVILLE-- The Town of cluding road maintenance, the Haverhill Selectmen met last police department,, town Monday for a pre-Christmas salaries, and poor and elderly meeting in which they an- assistance programs. Voters nounced the names of ten town will have final review over the residents who the selectmen committees recommended had appointed to serve on the appropriations at Haverhill's 1982 town budget committee, annual town meeting this According to the selectmen, March. the committee will begin their The selectmen indicated at budget hearings in early their meeting last Monday January. An exact date for the that they will soon begin first meet mg had notyetbeen preparing budget recom- determined as of last Monday. mendations for the corn- The committee will decide mittee. on appropriations for town services in Haverhill in- 1982 Budget Committee appreciates being in the Opinion that the MacLeans middle of history in the had planned on going to making," according to former Germany for a while before colleague Joseph Moore of the take-over but that they Newbury, now teaching at have dropped their plans for Vermont Technical College in fear that they would not be Union. Randolph. "I can't think of able to get back into Poland.i "Bruce is a history buff who anyone else more capable of Travel has also been banned! grasping a situation like this in the country without first one than Bruce," said Moore. obtaining permission from the i MacLean, 28, lived in Ely government. Fuel for private while he was at Oxbow but is consumption is not for sale in originally from Haughten, Poland under the terms of Ma., and is a graduate of the martial law and Moore said he University of Massachusetts thinks the MacLeans would be at Amherst. Moore describes reluctant to leave behind a him as a "serious student of new car they had recently European and Russian purchased. history" and as a person who According to Oxbow High "is not afraid to do things." School Principal Richard ' The entire country of Poland Rothenberg, MacLean has is said to be almost completely until Feb. 1, 1982 to notify the shut off from information school as to whether or not he regarding life inside Polish will be returning to Oxbow borders due to a government from his leave of absence. ban on uncensored news and Moore said that as he knows. film leaving the country, the MacLeans are planning on Foreign news media have had returning. However, he added to rely n reports from people that this was what the couple like MacLean and those was planning before the leaving Poland in order to military take-over. piece together a picture of "Obviously," said Moore, Polish life since the Polish "Bruce would be an asset to government declared"a state alnmst any S-ciai Studies of war" against its own department wherever he population last Monday. goes." Moore told the Journal been and tweakedonthenoseby Performing Arts. 'Operation Santa Claus' brings According to a list prepared Welcomed as a first the high priest as part of the New Year's is "as old as the by the selectmen, the at night if you were a official New Year's festival, hills," too. Recorded history following Haverhill residents Ired man. On the other At a New Year's Eve party shows that for more than 5,000 will serve on the 1982 budget You were a woman, a in Derbyshire, England, you .ar0000o00,e.00ve.000000omeChristma s to Bradford "'w'w|dt:cmmittee:A'FrankStiegler CO mk a beggar or a person might have fished for a ring in way of recognizing the lflllLIJJUJr., N. Haverhill: Laurent ress es steps, tn't, your font first in a "posset" pot. To foretell who beginning of a new year. In BRADFORD--The Bradford Guaranty  Savings Bank, Fournier, N. Haverhil!; Earl agencies. Gifts were C Estimates A ,-.--. , support of the time-honored Lions Club reported that the Bradford Lions Club, and the distributed by Bradford Lions Aremburg, Haverhill; Roger passes ost ct HAPPY BIRTHDAY concept of annual rebirth or Third Amgaal Operation Santa Pulaski Homemakers Cluh. based on need, said a club Warren, Haverhill; Margaret renewal, rituals and Claus was very successful. AsuccessfulCoffeeDaywas spokesman. Gifts included Lehman. Haverhill', Marjorie The House of Represen- legislation results in costs of celebrations have been the Over $1900 worth of Christmas held with the co-operation of toys and games, warm Page, N. Haverhill: Christine tatives has taken amajorstep at least $200 million, orifsuch KITTY PARTINGTON order of the day. gifts were delivered to 110 the Fairlee Diner, theVillage clothing, fruit, new tooth-Chamberlein. Mr. Lakes: toward controlling costs legislation imposes a heavy The day, hawever,'has not children in 35 families Store, the Coltaina brushes and Christmas candy. Joseph Miccini. Woodsville; created by federal regulatiom financial burden on state or Love Dad always been observed on the throughout thearea. Restaurant, the Chimes Many area merchants gave Barry Bigelow. N. Haverhill; but paid for by local and state local government. first of January by many of Donations of money and Restaurant, and the Garden discounts when purchases Roger Wells, N. Haverhill. governments with passage of "New Hampshire in par- the world's nations. In fact, gifts were received from Restaurant. Oxbow High were made for the program. A About 2.5 percent of the the State and Local Gover-  please turn to page I!) the new year has been laun- organizations, businesses and School students and faculty small portion of the funds Town of Haverhill's tax nment Cost Estimate Act, __ } ched on Christmas, Easter, individuals in Fairlee, raised $400 by raffling off a raised were kept to buy yarn revenue will come under the according to Congressman WANIED ] $[''6J E  I the autumnal equinox, the Bradford, Piermont, Top- radio-tape player, and other supplies for items corn m i tree's recom- JuddGregg. l Winter solstice and March25 sham, Newbury, and Corinth. Over 160 children were for the 1982 Operation Santa mendatior. Six percent of the This Act requires the OLD FURNITURE "'T" (around the time of the vernal Donations of $50 or more recommended to the Claus. Individuals who would town's tax revenue goes to Congressional Budget Office Tables, Desks, Hutches. _(k, I " [ equinox). March 25 seems to were received from: Bradford organizing committee by be able to knit items for next Grafton County, the other 69 (CBO), to prepare an estimate Bureaus. etc. have been one of the most Fire Department, Fairlee neighbors, charitable year may contact Chairman percent goes to the Haverhill ofcosts incurred by state and Callanytlme: 1-603.272-5s64 t..v-- (please turn t, page I 11 Fire Department, Woodsville organizations and social Larry Coffin at 2224423. Cooperative School District. local governments if the Jim Musty , r $125 PAINT.SPECIAL BRADFORD GAME ROOM ToilHouse Bread & 1 Happy Birthda, Y Christmas Stollen l $1.0 FOIt I'l('K-tl)! TllI.('KS VIDEO-- SUPERVISED-- PINBALL Toll liouse Bread , ill be making Christmas 1 M ]LTON BEDELL O't'ewexT"g'.O ,4J. (Behind Allen's Western Auto) Stollens starting l)ecemher 18th until the 31st. O t0W[R PtAINS Monday-Friday- 3-9 PM--Sat. I-gPM (802} 2?2- 44 ; TRff [,TtMATE$ BRADFORD. VT 05033 '4 116, Number 52 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshmre and Vermont December 30, 1981 "A history" buff in the middle of history" The day the army took over Poland by BRUCE MacLEAN Sunday, Dec. 13th 8:30 A.M. -- "I left the apartment and went out for a morning run. I didn't get I00 yards from my building when I ran into soldiers. At first I didn't think that much of it. In the past couple of months there have been periodic situations where soldiers have taken to the streets as a show of force and as a warning to the general public. However my view on the subject soon changed as I continued on my way. Soldiers were on every street corner and in full battle dress including AK-47s with bayonets attached, slung casually over their shoulders. "What really convinced me that something unusual was going on was the sight of ar- mored personal carriers parked at strategic in- tersections. When I got back to the apartment I tried calling a Polish friend to see if he had sorr news of the situation. I couldn't reach him as my phone was dead. I was soon to find out that all phones had been cut throughout the whole of Poland. 10:30-12:30 -- "I took my camera and spent the rest of the morning driving around Warsaw to try and determine the extent of the Military presence in the city. It was total. I was con- stantly being stopped by soldiers and re-routed. The soldiers appeared very friendly and were mostly 18 to 19 year old draftees who ap- peared to be as bewildered with what was on as the branch of Solidarity to see if anything was going on. There was a large group of people outside the building just waiting to pick up any news that may have come from Solidarity headquarters in Gdansk. One of the Solidarity officials there told me that the militia had raided the building at 11:30 the night before. It was exactly that time that the Polish Army had announced that Martial Law was now in effect. Cars going by the Solidarity building stopped and were handed leaflets by officials telling them what Solidarity had been able to learn up to that point. From there 1 drove past the American Embassy. All the gates were locked and the inside of the compound was being patrolled by Marine Guards. 1:30 P.M. "I left the apartment again and took a short walk over to the ABC News Bureau. I talked to the Bureau Chief who explained his frustration of having the biggest news story of the year to come out of Poland and not being able to get it out of the country. As I said before all phones had been cut. No telex was allowed either. All borders had been sealed and all airports shut down. Camera crews were forbidden to go out and film anything. What really upset him though was that he had heard that the Associated Press and Reuters were allowed to get their in- formation out. 2:00 P.M. -- "I leit the news bureau Militia carrying very long night sticks. Where as many Poles respect the army and see it as one of the few non- corrupt institutions left in Poland, they despise the Militia who they see as a symbol of the hated regime. "When I got to my friend's apartment, his family was gathered around the television. The regular an- nouncers were replaced by men in Military uniform. They were reading a long list of new regulations just announced by the new military council that was now running Poland. The Military had declared a 'State of War' on its own people. "Among the new regulations stated by the military were the following: --"All hunting rifles must be turned into the Police within 24 hours. -- "All personal liberties and civil liberties had been revoked. -- "Police may enter and Profae search any person's apart- ment T- including foreigners -- without any notice or prior warning. - "All persons from age 13 and on up must carry their documents with them at all times and anyone refusing to go into the Armed Forces, if called upon, can and will be punished by death. "My friend's mother who was with the family at the time, a very well known person in Poland who survived internment in Auschwitz -- one of many non-Jewish Poles to be sent there by the Nazis -- commented that Saturday night would go down in History in Poland as the last night Poles were free to speak on any subject they wanted. 3:30 P.M. -- "I walked back to Solidarity headquarters once again to see if anything new had developed. Again, there was a large crowd around the building. A Solidarity officiil came out and announced an open-ended General Strike throughout Poland, starting Monday at 9:00 in the mor- ning. There was wild applause from the crowd upon hearing this announcement. 4:00 P.M. -- "Back in the apartment l heard the BBC World Service News and not surprisingly devoted it's whole newscast to the situation in Poland. They were unable to receive any news from their correspon- dent based in Warsaw and consequently had to settle for monitoring Radio dispatches from Radio Poland for their information. 5:00 P.M. -- "The school principal came to my apartment to inform me that school had been cancelled Monday and possibly Tuesday as well. Tiffs course of action was necessary because Tele- communications was cut off (please-turn to page i I ) MacLean in Poland: on leave from Oxlmw high BRADFORD-- Bruce MacLean, the man behind this week's rather unique account in the Journal Opinion of life in Poland following a military take-over and information blackout by the Polish government, is currently living in Warsaw on a two- ,ear }cave oi ahsense from the New Year's, of redhea,00 s! -- "1 dropped by the about a mile away. the Bradford: headquarters of the Warsaw way I encountered scores of MacLean and his British wife Margaret, arrived in Poland one year ago to teach Warsaw after spending 1980 Orford lunch program needs at the American School in teaching at the American lower costs higher budget School inSophia, Bulgaria-- another Soviet block country. Smithsonian News Service Art couesy of Business Americana Collection.  [ Prior to his two-year stay at National Museum of American History ORFORD--Orford school school board that high food the price of the lunch that is I Oxbow High School beginning provided; serving a breakfast I in 1979, the MacLeans had also meal instead of a" lunch; or taught school in such varied board members met last week to discuss their next move regarding their school lunch program -- a program that is expecting to come up with a $4,000 to $5,000 deficit at the end of this school year. Under a federal subsidy program requirement, a during the school is required to serve two the hostess ounces of meat or meat MAN the door would portend bad would marry luck. Homeowners even got in following year, costs "must be reduced" and student participation in the lunch program increased if the Orford lunch program is to survive financially. School officials say that the alternative to the program -- no program, is an alternative they would prefer to avoid. A spokesman for the New Hampshire lunch program said that approximately 20 schools in the state have applied for and received waivers from the federally subsidized program. However, the spokesman said that these schools were substantially smaller thanthe Orford schools. A school with a waiver is not required to follow the state and federal school meal requirements. Less Food The Orford school board has been considering a variety of changes in the program that are designed to cut costs. Among these ideas have been: increases in appropriations from the school district; serving less food; increasing quaffing your last the habit of paying dark- dropped her wedding ring into substitute, two ounces of the New Year, beating haired men to be there early, the pot of hot spiced milk and substance from a fruit and pondering A Russian custom would wine, and the singles tried to vegetable group and one half- most important have required that you beat pick up the ring. with each pint of milk per pupil on a well ask the corners of your house with ladleful of the beverage. If a daily basis--plus eight ser- "What's all the fuss sticks to drive out Satan guest succeeded, it was a sure vings of bread per week. ' around the new year. You omen that he would wed that Orford's dilemma is finding be reassured; could try that today if you can year. a way to meet those before you have ignore the gape-mouthed Gift giving, visiting friends, requirements while keeping same to-do.., and stares of your neighbors, driving out evil and foretelling the cost of the program at an How about "wassailing" events of the coming year ai'e affordable level. School lunch in old England, your apple tree, as British but a few New Year's customs programs have been said to be Imve gathered farmers were wont to do, by that have been carried on hard hit by federal cut-backs sacred trees to sprinkling it with cider and through the ages. New Year's in lunch reimbursement gifts, singing a song for a good crop is one holiday that just about programs along with rising might have gone in the coming year? Just tell everyone around the world, food prices and declining " in Scotland. the quickly ga.thering crowd Westerners and Easterners, budgets. midnight church that it's an old family custom, celebrate in some fashion on Cut Costs Scottish homes were If you were a king in ancient some set date, says Shirley William Moorman, director visitors, and it was Babylon, you would have been Cherkasky, who has of accounting for the schools a family's luck for stripped of your royal robe, researched holiday inOrford, Lyme, Norwichand t, would depend on who made to kneel and then celebrations for the Hanover reportedly told the solemnly boxed on the ears Smithsonian's Division of Would have going through the process.of obtaining a waiver. In order to obtain a waiver, such a decision must first be approved by the voters at their March school district meeting. parts of the globe as Aber- deen, Scotland and at the American School in Moscow, capital city of the Soviet 1982 Town of Haverhill budget commiuee named WOODSVILLE-- The Town of cluding road maintenance, the Haverhill Selectmen met last police department,, town Monday for a pre-Christmas salaries, and poor and elderly meeting in which they an- assistance programs. Voters nounced the names of ten town will have final review over the residents who the selectmen committees recommended had appointed to serve on the appropriations at Haverhill's 1982 town budget committee, annual town meeting this According to the selectmen, March. the committee will begin their The selectmen indicated at budget hearings in early their meeting last Monday January. An exact date for the that they will soon begin first meet mg had notyetbeen preparing budget recom- determined as of last Monday. mendations for the corn- The committee will decide mittee. on appropriations for town services in Haverhill in- 1982 Budget Committee appreciates being in the Opinion that the MacLeans middle of history in the had planned on going to making," according to former Germany for a while before colleague Joseph Moore of the take-over but that they Newbury, now teaching at have dropped their plans for Vermont Technical College in fear that they would not be Union. Randolph. "I can't think of able to get back into Poland.i "Bruce is a history buff who anyone else more capable of Travel has also been banned! grasping a situation like this in the country without first one than Bruce," said Moore. obtaining permission from the i MacLean, 28, lived in Ely government. Fuel for private while he was at Oxbow but is consumption is not for sale in originally from Haughten, Poland under the terms of Ma., and is a graduate of the martial law and Moore said he University of Massachusetts thinks the MacLeans would be at Amherst. Moore describes reluctant to leave behind a him as a "serious student of new car they had recently European and Russian purchased. history" and as a person who According to Oxbow High "is not afraid to do things." School Principal Richard ' The entire country of Poland Rothenberg, MacLean has is said to be almost completely until Feb. 1, 1982 to notify the shut off from information school as to whether or not he regarding life inside Polish will be returning to Oxbow borders due to a government from his leave of absence. ban on uncensored news and Moore said that as he knows. film leaving the country, the MacLeans are planning on Foreign news media have had returning. However, he added to rely n reports from people that this was what the couple like MacLean and those was planning before the leaving Poland in order to military take-over. piece together a picture of "Obviously," said Moore, Polish life since the Polish "Bruce would be an asset to government declared"a state alnmst any S-ciai Studies of war" against its own department wherever he population last Monday. goes." Moore told the Journal been and tweakedonthenoseby Performing Arts. 'Operation Santa Claus' brings According to a list prepared Welcomed as a first the high priest as part of the New Year's is "as old as the by the selectmen, the at night if you were a official New Year's festival, hills," too. Recorded history following Haverhill residents Ired man. On the other At a New Year's Eve party shows that for more than 5,000 will serve on the 1982 budget You were a woman, a in Derbyshire, England, you .ar0000o00,e.00ve.000000omeChristma s to Bradford "'w'w|dt:cmmittee:A'FrankStiegler CO mk a beggar or a person might have fished for a ring in way of recognizing the lflllLIJJUJr., N. Haverhill: Laurent ress es steps, tn't, your font first in a "posset" pot. To foretell who beginning of a new year. In BRADFORD--The Bradford Guaranty  Savings Bank, Fournier, N. Haverhil!; Earl agencies. Gifts were C Estimates A ,-.--. , support of the time-honored Lions Club reported that the Bradford Lions Club, and the distributed by Bradford Lions Aremburg, Haverhill; Roger passes ost ct HAPPY BIRTHDAY concept of annual rebirth or Third Amgaal Operation Santa Pulaski Homemakers Cluh. based on need, said a club Warren, Haverhill; Margaret renewal, rituals and Claus was very successful. AsuccessfulCoffeeDaywas spokesman. Gifts included Lehman. Haverhill', Marjorie The House of Represen- legislation results in costs of celebrations have been the Over $1900 worth of Christmas held with the co-operation of toys and games, warm Page, N. Haverhill: Christine tatives has taken amajorstep at least $200 million, orifsuch KITTY PARTINGTON order of the day. gifts were delivered to 110 the Fairlee Diner, theVillage clothing, fruit, new tooth-Chamberlein. Mr. Lakes: toward controlling costs legislation imposes a heavy The day, hawever,'has not children in 35 families Store, the Coltaina brushes and Christmas candy. Joseph Miccini. Woodsville; created by federal regulatiom financial burden on state or Love Dad always been observed on the throughout thearea. Restaurant, the Chimes Many area merchants gave Barry Bigelow. N. Haverhill; but paid for by local and state local government. first of January by many of Donations of money and Restaurant, and the Garden discounts when purchases Roger Wells, N. Haverhill. governments with passage of "New Hampshire in par- the world's nations. In fact, gifts were received from Restaurant. Oxbow High were made for the program. A About 2.5 percent of the the State and Local Gover-  please turn to page I!) the new year has been laun- organizations, businesses and School students and faculty small portion of the funds Town of Haverhill's tax nment Cost Estimate Act, __ } ched on Christmas, Easter, individuals in Fairlee, raised $400 by raffling off a raised were kept to buy yarn revenue will come under the according to Congressman WANIED ] $[''6J E  I the autumnal equinox, the Bradford, Piermont, Top- radio-tape player, and other supplies for items corn m i tree's recom- JuddGregg. l Winter solstice and March25 sham, Newbury, and Corinth. Over 160 children were for the 1982 Operation Santa mendatior. Six percent of the This Act requires the OLD FURNITURE "'T" (around the time of the vernal Donations of $50 or more recommended to the Claus. Individuals who would town's tax revenue goes to Congressional Budget Office Tables, Desks, Hutches. _(k, I " [ equinox). March 25 seems to were received from: Bradford organizing committee by be able to knit items for next Grafton County, the other 69 (CBO), to prepare an estimate Bureaus. etc. have been one of the most Fire Department, Fairlee neighbors, charitable year may contact Chairman percent goes to the Haverhill ofcosts incurred by state and Callanytlme: 1-603.272-5s64 t..v-- (please turn t, page I 11 Fire Department, Woodsville organizations and social Larry Coffin at 2224423. Cooperative School District. local governments if the Jim Musty , r $125 PAINT.SPECIAL BRADFORD GAME ROOM ToilHouse Bread & 1 Happy Birthda, Y Christmas Stollen l $1.0 FOIt I'l('K-tl)! TllI.('KS VIDEO-- SUPERVISED-- PINBALL Toll liouse Bread , ill be making Christmas 1 M ]LTON BEDELL O't'ewexT"g'.O ,4J. (Behind Allen's Western Auto) Stollens starting l)ecemher 18th until the 31st. O t0W[R PtAINS Monday-Friday- 3-9 PM--Sat. I-gPM (802} 2?2- 44 ; TRff [,TtMATE$ BRADFORD. VT 05033