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December 30, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-December 30, 1981 EAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal i Opinion Woek anpi luddbl le II0dd, Vornont. SqdcripOtu redo Vormt eund New Ilempd0gre - $9.0e gr yee; t4.1)0 fw rail mm:  ,d . $12.M per Teer e0d Sr.S0 fw s meanflu; Sea r, itlau dlhmnmt $2.U. - Seoad elm1 pestop peid o! Iredfocd, Vonnonl Olll$, PwbliMI0od b,/ Newesl Pvbliogldq Compu. I., P.O. Oox 378, |mdfoalL Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher ; .  Woodsville Bradford  02-222.5281  . y 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Editorial Repression in Poland For the 36 million people of Poland and for millions of other people around the world, last week will go down in history as possibly the most repressive period in European history during the later half of the 20th century. Repression and military purges are nothing new to Eastern Europe and Soviet block countries. Exiled Soviet dissident Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who now lives in seclusion on his farm in Cavendish, Vt., has chronicled similar though less publicized in the Soviet Union, in continuous waves dating from the early 1900's to the 1950's. But what makes the Polish government's "declaration of war" on its own people so devastating is that prior to the installation of martial law, the prospects of a new kind of relationship between the leaders of the Poland and against individuals "under suspicion" of violating martial law; all Polish citizens are required to carry iden- tification at all times and are prohibited from leaving their homes for more than 48 hours at a time. All information and news within the country is controlled by government media, an organization that is told only information that conforms to the best interest of the Communist Party, As George Orwell said in his famous book 1984, "In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king." The first-hand account by Bruce MacLean in this week's Journal Opinion of the first day that martial law was imposed in Poland, gives the situation an added reality that is sometimes lacking from often im- personal international news accounts. We would like to thank Mr. MacLean for taking the risk of relaying his observations on the events that are within the grasp of those who were seeking it. Reports from Poland say that as many as 50,000 Polish citizens are now under arrest. All telephone com- munication has been stopped within the country; all travel has been banned; gas stations have been closed to private cars; a, 10:00 p.m. curfew has been imposed nationwide with stricter curfews in areas of unrest., summary proceedings are taken him and his wife a safe and happy new year along with the rest of those living in Poland. In our country, a situation of such a total repression of basic freedoms is hard to picture. Too often we take for granted and shun the rights of those who speak out without fully realizing the alternative. The extreme alternative is being exhibited in Poland today. Letters to the Editor__) To the Editor: Throughout all history there are examples of Trojan horses, men like Neville Chamberlain and The conspb'acv encirclement of America 1I of 17 divisior, but in their would set us up for the conquest for world rule they ultimate throat. This is why prefer not to fight but to their stooges call for one sided "pluck their enemy from surprise disarmament, no nuclear within like ripened fruit." We attacks like the one we ex- power plants, no hydro lines learn from history that the perieneed at Pearl Harbor. In from Canada, no coal-fired best way to he at peace is to be my lifetime I have observed electric plants because of acid so strong that no one dare the communist conspiracy rain, and no hydro plants attack you, and this is as true move swiftly like an attacking because the dams would kill for Mohammed All as it is for snake, then coik, then strike, the tiny snail darters. The the Unitel States. I say more and then devour its prey. Their goal, of court, is world conquest and world government "Darth Vader style," if you have seen the movie "Star Wars." The plan has been to take Eastern Europe, Asia, and to encircle America by having the Conspiracy control Cuba, the Central American countries, and then Quebec. It has been a part of the original plan to cause America to spend herself into ruin and to debauch the currency. At the same time the con- spiracy works to demoralize our youth and to create an energy crisis which coupled with the currency crisis, and conspirators are as clever as hydro power, more solar Russian chess playbrs, power, more nuclear power because their goals and plans plants, submarines and "to bury us" are as real as whatever else it takes to make martial lawinPoland, our country once again the Communism feeds on its strongest nation on earth. I get neighbors, like a cancer in a body or a cavity in a tooth, a chill up my spine as I see the snake draw closer and hear its Eliminating nuclear weapons stooges preach peace at any from the froe part of the world price over the TV and is not going to bring peace elsewhere. My ancestors did except to the dead who will be not fight at Concord, White slaughtered, disemboweled, Plains and Gettysburg to have and tortured in unspeakable me bleeding like a sheep on its ways. knees and begging for mercy Throughout my lifetime from some "Over Lord" Russia has maintained the commissar or terrorist and I largest standing army on suspect that most of you feel earth of about 72 divisions of the same way. soldiers compared to our WilllamK.Tufts maximum force in World War Bethel, Vermont 00/s/ators not/ce To the Editor: systems pay no taxes to Uncle I find it difficult to un- Sam. The more I think of it, derstand the rationale of the private sector should get Vermont's municipal and the lion's share of PASNY cooperative electric utilities, power. when they say that their Legislators take notice. The customers are the only ones majority of you represent entitled to PASNY power, areas served by the private VERSHIRE SCHOOL BOARD VERSHIRE-- The Velhire School Board will hold a budget meeting on Wed- nesday, Jan. 6 at I0:00 a,m. The meeting will take place at the Orange East Supervisory The PASNY projects were power companies. Maybe it is Union District Superin- built with public funds, and time to make some statutory tendent's officein Bradford. come changes in order to clip the much of federal revenues that sources that money support public projects are helped tobuild. derived from private industry George R. Pitman and business. Certainly Berlin, Vermont municipal and cooperative Three things for which thanks are due; an invitation, a gift, and a warning. -Welsh Proverb. Sawmills in Groton The harvesting of timber Four generations and over men in the mill and in the and the manufacture of wood products have been major enterprises in Groton ever since its settlement, due to its mountainous landscape. Through the years there have been sawmills at about 12 different sites in the town. The history and owners of each are given in detail in Mister Glover's Groton. In one year, 1887, there were seven sawm ills currently in operation. We will follow the history of the ones on the sites of the Ricker and the Miller mills. Ricker Mill The first sawmill in GrotQn was built in 1790 by Capt. Edmind Morse, three miles west of Groton at the outlet of what is now called Ricker Pond -- a location which provided both a millpond and waterpower, in the vicinity of a" fine stand of pine trees. At the time when this mill closed in 1963, it was the oldest sawmill on its original site in the United States. According to local tradition, this site was an old Indian trail from the Winooski River to the Connecticut. Up on the hill nearby at the old Sanders farm was a sprng where the Indians used to stop for water, and Sanders' men used to find arrowheads there and at the outlet of the pond. In the early years, Capt. Morse's sawmill was com- bined with a gristmill. Around 1797, he sold the mill to Mnses Noyes but, two or three years later, Mr. Noyes went out to 100 years of ownership by the woods worked a 12-hour day Ricker family began in 1856 and earned about $9 per week with Joseph Ricker, followed for six days of work. They by his son Amaziah, his were surprised one day to get grandsons Edmund and a day off following the an- Harry, then Harry's son Raymond. Joseph Ricker operated the mill for only four years, then sold it to Amaziah, who ran it for nearly 50 years, again renovating the mill and installing its first circular saw. He began with 100 acres of timberland and eventually increased it to 2000. He produced up to a half a million feet of lumber annually until the Montpelier & Wells River Railroad came through his millyard in 1873, when he was able to double his production. Around 1900 he was hack to half a million, but he was putting out mostly hardwood, which he was working into bobbins and chair stock. With the softwood he was making finished boards, box boards for the granite industry, hemlock bark for tanneries, also pulp, slabs, and sawdust. He equipped the mill with a shingle machine, a clapboard machine, a planer and a matcher. Besides making many improvements in the mill, Amaziah built substantial company houses and a boardinghouse, and ran a company store, post office, and railroad flag station. (See Book One, pages 104 and 105.) His little village was almost self-sufficient, as he alsorana farm nearby to produce milk, meat, vegetables, and even honey from his own bees. Like nouncement, "Play day -- girl born," after the birth of Amaziah's daughter Mary (who became Dr. Harry Rowe's mother). Old papers in Amaziah Ricker's safe revealed a family feud like that of the Hatfields and McCoys, although we don't know of any blood being spilled. Over a period of years, Amaziah had borrowed funds from Hoses Welch, Jr. and Almon Clark for sawmill financing, as evidenced by paid-up notes in the safe. However. at some time the three men came into a serious disagreement which resulted in lawsuits and court action over a period of nearly eight years. Older folks remember the family squabble in 1933 when Raymond Ricker married Leona Page, great- granddaughter of Hosea Welch, Jr. Fortunately, members of this younger generation were able to carry on their lives in spite of the bitterness between their ancestors. When Amaziah died he left the sawmill to his sons Edmund and Harry. A few years later Harry bought Ed's share in the mill and carried on its operation. Times were hard at the mill during the Depression, but Harry kept a small crew busy most of the time, cutting pulp or sometimes just painting the buildings, and the men ac- cepted a cut in pay rather than be laid off completely. Finally after having no orders for lumber for six months, an order came for two carloads of boards, and gradually business got going again. Their small crew logged in the woods during the winter, cutting hardwood logs, then in the spring they sawed them into boards, dried them during the summer, then in the fall cut them to specifications to fill orders. Old records show that in 1933 they were making mostly chair stock, but by 1942 they were doing mostly custom sawing. Leona Ricker says that work one morning and never was heard from again --or so they say. Other operators of this mill were Silas Lund and his sons. also Robert Taisey, Walter Buchanan who renovated the mill, and Ira Darling who added a clap- board machine. The mill was still using the old up-and-down Clearing logs from Blodgett's meadow. many othersaroundthattime, developed by the U.S.U.S. House, had in October, he also produced and sold an Department of Energy and initiated a formal ;equest that assortment of patent publicly released today by the Energy Department medicines. A typical day at Ricker's began at 4 a,m. for the women who prepared breakfast for the men. The ladies also did all their housework before mid-morning, leaving the rest of the day free for mending, cooking, ning. The Our River Jeffords pushes wood as large WASHINGTON--Use of wood U.S. Rep. James M Jeffords, improve its statistical com- as fuel is more widespread R-Vt. pilations of wood energy use, than previously thought, Jeffords, co-chairman of the and to publish the information according to estimates Wood Energy Caucus in the in a manner which would be The Swnbol of our Country Did you salute as I passed by? Or did you forget I'm the symbol of our country, The best country and--yet-- Were you proud to see me waving? Did you stand and show your love Of our Country, Flag, and Freedom Blessed by the Good Lord above. I am proud of what I stand for, As I lead the grand parade; And you folks on the sidelines, If you salute, I've had it made. Those who march on with me, Their hearts swell with pride, For they fought for your Freedom, And there were others who fought and died. useful in development of U.S. energy policy. At that time, Jeffords had noted that by rough estimates, wood was assumed to provide at least 1.5 quads (quadrillion BTU's) of energy, surpassing hydro and nuclear energy in end use. He said the informational resources used in develop- ment of national energy policy were distorted by the lack of solid statistics, collected for all other major energy sources and published in government publications, particularly the Energy Department's Monthly Energy Review. A response to Jeffords' request from Energy Secretary James B. Edwards was released this week to members of the Wood Energy Caucus. Edwards said significant progress has been made in the difficult task of compiling statistics on wood energy use, and that preliminary estimates are now being subjected to review to assure their accuracy. However, Edwards revealed that the preliminary estimates for 1980 are that wood accounted for 2 to 2.5 quads of energy--between half a quad and a full quad more than previously estimated. "That is a significant amount, and we want to do a proper job before in- corporating these data into all of our energy summary publications," Edwards said in his statement. "We can assure you that the EIA (the Department's Energy Information Administration) Did you watch the parade this morning? Did you salute as I passed by? Did you show your Love of Country, "Live for Freedom or die"? Or do you take me just for granted? PLEASE, LET US NOT FORGET, I'M THE SYMBOL OF OUR COUNTRY, The best one, you can bet! Shirley McKean Haverhill Memorial VFW Auxiliary No. 5245 :. 'I Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton . ' The Dec. 23rd Governor and Council meeting was one of the more exciting meetings that we've had in some time. The Council approved a $4 million bond issue for the G.H Bass & Co. of Berlin for ex- pansion of the Bass Shoe plant. This plant will eventually employ some 500 people in the Berlin area. The Council also approved the findings for nine low head hydro dams in the state. Three in District One: Avery Dam in Laconia, Newfound Lake Dam in Bristol, and the Mascoma Lake Dam in Lebanon, all nine have been sent back to the Water Resources board for final hearings and selection of a developer who will actually lease the site and construct a hydro elect ric generating plant. The Governor and Council also approved Ihe final lease for the Pontook Hydro- Electric Project in Dummer. Mter many years of hearings and negotiations this project. I believe, will be of benefit to the northern electric needs. This facility will provide electricity for 7.700 homes, in- crease thi, acreage for wildlife habitat above the newly constructed dam. There will be a loss of about one mile of river for complete white water canoeing and perhaps some lessening of fishing, but I know several individuals who spent most of the winter of 1981 paying their electric bills. I firmly believe that it is not too much by ROBERT A. MICHENFELDER It's hard to keep your mouth shut these days. Every front page, every six o'clock news report carries some information that cries out for. if not a sharp comment, at least a snide remark As you can guess, its acid rain again, a subject that seems capable of raising hypocracy to new heights. Let's go back a few years to the creation of the New England Regional Commission. This was a major planning organization, funded by the federal government and ad- ministered by the six northeastern states. It wasn't a bad idea. It served as a means of channeling federal funds into the area in such a way as to make broad regional concerns the business of an ordered interstate body. If there were abuses, they were the "normal" ones expected in such operations. One of its brothers-in-arms was the New England River Basins Commission-- again federally funded with an ad- ministrative and financial commitment from those same states. Wheh the Reagan Administration put its budget cutting act together, both of these groups met the same fate and ceased to exist after October 1st. The New England Governor's Conference, recognizing immediately the loss it had suf- fered, had the good sense to "take over" both organizations. The result has been a broadened scope of responsibility for the Conference and the creation of a regional Water Resources Commission. This Commission is a recognition by the Governors that water and water related problems will be big items on any agenda for the future. As a result, much of the concerns of the old NERBC will be picked up by this new body. Now the kicker. Acid rain is one of the big concerns, as well it should be. The Governor's Conference has just received a preliminary report on a study that the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station will present some time in June of next year. The report finds that "naturally acidic soils" play a greater role in stream and lake acidification than acid precipilation, that the return of forest cover to former agricultural lands, ordinarily less acidic, is the culprit. For crying out loud. This reminds one of the learned "research institutes" paid for by the tobacco companies, that still maintain that there is no demonstrable connection between smoking and various cardio-pulmonary disorders. Any farmer will tell you that a few points on the ph scale often make the difference between a crop and a failure, between a profit and a catastrophe. With acid rain we are not talking about a few points--we are talking about a thousand times normal acidity. In the dead lakes of the Adirondacks and Canada (surrounded by woods since God put them together) we are finding acid increases on the scale of hundreds. Fortunately, not everybody is being taken in. The Chair- man of the Nc' Hampshire Pollution Control Commission is highly skeptical, noting that the National Science Foundation had found "circumstantial but overwhelming evidence that link acid rain and acidity in lakes and streams". The EPA and its Canadian counterpart have come to the same con- chmions. The problem for the researchers has been the inability to prove that a specific dab of sulphur dioxide from a specific smoke stack in central Ohio has associated with a specific rop of water under specific atmospheric conditions come the drop of acid that killed a specific rainbow trnut in Ihe Batten Kill, a series of facts and events that must be demonslrated before the courts or responsible bureaucracies feel free to act. It will be interesting to see how the Con- nectleut Agricultural Experiment Station has marshalled "'hard" evidence to prove all the others wrong. toask that one mile of many miles be given up for generating electrical power for the North Country. Much to his credit. Gov. Gallen stuck his neck out and joined in urging council members to act favorably on this project. As your Councilor, I have always been a strong supporter of small low head hydro power in the northern areas. The Council confirmed Donald Ladd of Colebrook to the Connecticut River Valley Flood Control Commission, Eugene B. Andes of Union to the Solid Waste Management Board, Julia Fifield of Orford to the State Historic Preservation Review Board, and Gerald Aikens of Berlin to the Board of Appeal. Peter ttance of Laconia was nominated to the Water Resources Board and William Anderson of Meredilh was nominated to the Youth Development Center Bpard. The Council also accepted and placed on file the Annual Reports of the Secretary of State's Office, the N.H. Crime Com- mission, and the Department of Safety. Anyone wishing copies of these reports, please write or call me, Ray Burton, RFD 1. Woodsville. N.H. 03785 {747-3662 and 271- ?,2.) The next Council meeting is scheduled for January 6. l0 a.m. at the State llouse. I would be honored to have you in attendance as it is an honor toserve yon and lhis district as a public official? during the Depression, Ricker had shipped a of chair stock worth furniture factory Massachusetts, but he got paid for it -- all he of it was one of the corn chairs, which he Raymond and Leena wedding present. The chair is still in use, in generation of Rickers. When the railroad out in 1956 it was a blow to Ricker Mill, but there other difficulties on horizon the the old mill and the of nearby forests. Ricker put up the for a new mill, but to get financing for the it, and finally old mill in 1963. Sources: Fa recollections and papers Leona Ricker: school paper by Alton Ricker, Mister Glover's Groton. Next week: Miller's has made conside progress in the devel of wood fuel informati plans to publish the d soon as is practical." Edwards said three had been authorized wil Department relating t fuel information. The "Wood Energy Data Requirements Study,' completed in July of thi The second, "Derek and Implementatio Historical Wood Cons Estimating Method0 /950-1980" iS nearinl[ pletxon. The third, Cd of 1981 Wood ConsUl Statistics," is in the p : stages. Jeffords said be i couraged' by t,h, p "---- being made in filli serious information v has hampered effort corporate wood fue! major component t energy policy." | He said legislative  relating to wood ene cluding his own long proposals for wood st credits, have been partly because of the "the solid informat have for every othe energy source." Jeffords said it is c; wood is the renewab[ source which "has greatest impact iv years in displacing f and has the greatest p with proper manager major component in/J to increase our toward energy indel in the immediate fut0 LaMott Vice Cha/r00 of Commi00 HAVERHILL--Rep LaMott, a Republican, has [ pointed by House\\; John B. Tucker to vice chairman of Appropriations Con Now serving his', in the House, Rep. I ...,_.. spent five terms , fluential Appr Committee and o vice chairman i} Committee on ' Veterans Affair currently chairnu the statutory Capi Oversight Commitl Appropriations R e j Transportatiold committee. | "It is reassurin[J[ know that the stall faithful,watchdog affairs, ' the spe r -- new vice chairman.. LaMott will fill tl: created when Rep.] Kidder, the fo chairman, was sl acting chairing] - Appropriations CoP[ October. [ LaMott is , mechanical con and his wife Muri. child, Mrs. Fredef  , Jr., of Arlington 14  p.- ( Page 4-The Journal Opinion-December 30, 1981 EAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal i Opinion Woek anpi luddbl le II0dd, Vornont. SqdcripOtu redo Vormt eund New Ilempd0gre - $9.0e gr yee; t4.1)0 fw rail mm:  ,d . $12.M per Teer e0d Sr.S0 fw s meanflu; Sea r, itlau dlhmnmt $2.U. - Seoad elm1 pestop peid o! Iredfocd, Vonnonl Olll$, PwbliMI0od b,/ Newesl Pvbliogldq Compu. I., P.O. Oox 378, |mdfoalL Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher ; .  Woodsville Bradford  02-222.5281  . y 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Editorial Repression in Poland For the 36 million people of Poland and for millions of other people around the world, last week will go down in history as possibly the most repressive period in European history during the later half of the 20th century. Repression and military purges are nothing new to Eastern Europe and Soviet block countries. Exiled Soviet dissident Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who now lives in seclusion on his farm in Cavendish, Vt., has chronicled similar though less publicized in the Soviet Union, in continuous waves dating from the early 1900's to the 1950's. But what makes the Polish government's "declaration of war" on its own people so devastating is that prior to the installation of martial law, the prospects of a new kind of relationship between the leaders of the Poland and against individuals "under suspicion" of violating martial law; all Polish citizens are required to carry iden- tification at all times and are prohibited from leaving their homes for more than 48 hours at a time. All information and news within the country is controlled by government media, an organization that is told only information that conforms to the best interest of the Communist Party, As George Orwell said in his famous book 1984, "In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king." The first-hand account by Bruce MacLean in this week's Journal Opinion of the first day that martial law was imposed in Poland, gives the situation an added reality that is sometimes lacking from often im- personal international news accounts. We would like to thank Mr. MacLean for taking the risk of relaying his observations on the events that are within the grasp of those who were seeking it. Reports from Poland say that as many as 50,000 Polish citizens are now under arrest. All telephone com- munication has been stopped within the country; all travel has been banned; gas stations have been closed to private cars; a, 10:00 p.m. curfew has been imposed nationwide with stricter curfews in areas of unrest., summary proceedings are taken him and his wife a safe and happy new year along with the rest of those living in Poland. In our country, a situation of such a total repression of basic freedoms is hard to picture. Too often we take for granted and shun the rights of those who speak out without fully realizing the alternative. The extreme alternative is being exhibited in Poland today. Letters to the Editor__) To the Editor: Throughout all history there are examples of Trojan horses, men like Neville Chamberlain and The conspb'acv encirclement of America 1I of 17 divisior, but in their would set us up for the conquest for world rule they ultimate throat. This is why prefer not to fight but to their stooges call for one sided "pluck their enemy from surprise disarmament, no nuclear within like ripened fruit." We attacks like the one we ex- power plants, no hydro lines learn from history that the perieneed at Pearl Harbor. In from Canada, no coal-fired best way to he at peace is to be my lifetime I have observed electric plants because of acid so strong that no one dare the communist conspiracy rain, and no hydro plants attack you, and this is as true move swiftly like an attacking because the dams would kill for Mohammed All as it is for snake, then coik, then strike, the tiny snail darters. The the Unitel States. I say more and then devour its prey. Their goal, of court, is world conquest and world government "Darth Vader style," if you have seen the movie "Star Wars." The plan has been to take Eastern Europe, Asia, and to encircle America by having the Conspiracy control Cuba, the Central American countries, and then Quebec. It has been a part of the original plan to cause America to spend herself into ruin and to debauch the currency. At the same time the con- spiracy works to demoralize our youth and to create an energy crisis which coupled with the currency crisis, and conspirators are as clever as hydro power, more solar Russian chess playbrs, power, more nuclear power because their goals and plans plants, submarines and "to bury us" are as real as whatever else it takes to make martial lawinPoland, our country once again the Communism feeds on its strongest nation on earth. I get neighbors, like a cancer in a body or a cavity in a tooth, a chill up my spine as I see the snake draw closer and hear its Eliminating nuclear weapons stooges preach peace at any from the froe part of the world price over the TV and is not going to bring peace elsewhere. My ancestors did except to the dead who will be not fight at Concord, White slaughtered, disemboweled, Plains and Gettysburg to have and tortured in unspeakable me bleeding like a sheep on its ways. knees and begging for mercy Throughout my lifetime from some "Over Lord" Russia has maintained the commissar or terrorist and I largest standing army on suspect that most of you feel earth of about 72 divisions of the same way. soldiers compared to our WilllamK.Tufts maximum force in World War Bethel, Vermont 00/s/ators not/ce To the Editor: systems pay no taxes to Uncle I find it difficult to un- Sam. The more I think of it, derstand the rationale of the private sector should get Vermont's municipal and the lion's share of PASNY cooperative electric utilities, power. when they say that their Legislators take notice. The customers are the only ones majority of you represent entitled to PASNY power, areas served by the private VERSHIRE SCHOOL BOARD VERSHIRE-- The Velhire School Board will hold a budget meeting on Wed- nesday, Jan. 6 at I0:00 a,m. The meeting will take place at the Orange East Supervisory The PASNY projects were power companies. Maybe it is Union District Superin- built with public funds, and time to make some statutory tendent's officein Bradford. come changes in order to clip the much of federal revenues that sources that money support public projects are helped tobuild. derived from private industry George R. Pitman and business. Certainly Berlin, Vermont municipal and cooperative Three things for which thanks are due; an invitation, a gift, and a warning. -Welsh Proverb. Sawmills in Groton The harvesting of timber Four generations and over men in the mill and in the and the manufacture of wood products have been major enterprises in Groton ever since its settlement, due to its mountainous landscape. Through the years there have been sawmills at about 12 different sites in the town. The history and owners of each are given in detail in Mister Glover's Groton. In one year, 1887, there were seven sawm ills currently in operation. We will follow the history of the ones on the sites of the Ricker and the Miller mills. Ricker Mill The first sawmill in GrotQn was built in 1790 by Capt. Edmind Morse, three miles west of Groton at the outlet of what is now called Ricker Pond -- a location which provided both a millpond and waterpower, in the vicinity of a" fine stand of pine trees. At the time when this mill closed in 1963, it was the oldest sawmill on its original site in the United States. According to local tradition, this site was an old Indian trail from the Winooski River to the Connecticut. Up on the hill nearby at the old Sanders farm was a sprng where the Indians used to stop for water, and Sanders' men used to find arrowheads there and at the outlet of the pond. In the early years, Capt. Morse's sawmill was com- bined with a gristmill. Around 1797, he sold the mill to Mnses Noyes but, two or three years later, Mr. Noyes went out to 100 years of ownership by the woods worked a 12-hour day Ricker family began in 1856 and earned about $9 per week with Joseph Ricker, followed for six days of work. They by his son Amaziah, his were surprised one day to get grandsons Edmund and a day off following the an- Harry, then Harry's son Raymond. Joseph Ricker operated the mill for only four years, then sold it to Amaziah, who ran it for nearly 50 years, again renovating the mill and installing its first circular saw. He began with 100 acres of timberland and eventually increased it to 2000. He produced up to a half a million feet of lumber annually until the Montpelier & Wells River Railroad came through his millyard in 1873, when he was able to double his production. Around 1900 he was hack to half a million, but he was putting out mostly hardwood, which he was working into bobbins and chair stock. With the softwood he was making finished boards, box boards for the granite industry, hemlock bark for tanneries, also pulp, slabs, and sawdust. He equipped the mill with a shingle machine, a clapboard machine, a planer and a matcher. Besides making many improvements in the mill, Amaziah built substantial company houses and a boardinghouse, and ran a company store, post office, and railroad flag station. (See Book One, pages 104 and 105.) His little village was almost self-sufficient, as he alsorana farm nearby to produce milk, meat, vegetables, and even honey from his own bees. Like nouncement, "Play day -- girl born," after the birth of Amaziah's daughter Mary (who became Dr. Harry Rowe's mother). Old papers in Amaziah Ricker's safe revealed a family feud like that of the Hatfields and McCoys, although we don't know of any blood being spilled. Over a period of years, Amaziah had borrowed funds from Hoses Welch, Jr. and Almon Clark for sawmill financing, as evidenced by paid-up notes in the safe. However. at some time the three men came into a serious disagreement which resulted in lawsuits and court action over a period of nearly eight years. Older folks remember the family squabble in 1933 when Raymond Ricker married Leona Page, great- granddaughter of Hosea Welch, Jr. Fortunately, members of this younger generation were able to carry on their lives in spite of the bitterness between their ancestors. When Amaziah died he left the sawmill to his sons Edmund and Harry. A few years later Harry bought Ed's share in the mill and carried on its operation. Times were hard at the mill during the Depression, but Harry kept a small crew busy most of the time, cutting pulp or sometimes just painting the buildings, and the men ac- cepted a cut in pay rather than be laid off completely. Finally after having no orders for lumber for six months, an order came for two carloads of boards, and gradually business got going again. Their small crew logged in the woods during the winter, cutting hardwood logs, then in the spring they sawed them into boards, dried them during the summer, then in the fall cut them to specifications to fill orders. Old records show that in 1933 they were making mostly chair stock, but by 1942 they were doing mostly custom sawing. Leona Ricker says that work one morning and never was heard from again --or so they say. Other operators of this mill were Silas Lund and his sons. also Robert Taisey, Walter Buchanan who renovated the mill, and Ira Darling who added a clap- board machine. The mill was still using the old up-and-down Clearing logs from Blodgett's meadow. many othersaroundthattime, developed by the U.S.U.S. House, had in October, he also produced and sold an Department of Energy and initiated a formal ;equest that assortment of patent publicly released today by the Energy Department medicines. A typical day at Ricker's began at 4 a,m. for the women who prepared breakfast for the men. The ladies also did all their housework before mid-morning, leaving the rest of the day free for mending, cooking, ning. The Our River Jeffords pushes wood as large WASHINGTON--Use of wood U.S. Rep. James M Jeffords, improve its statistical com- as fuel is more widespread R-Vt. pilations of wood energy use, than previously thought, Jeffords, co-chairman of the and to publish the information according to estimates Wood Energy Caucus in the in a manner which would be The Swnbol of our Country Did you salute as I passed by? Or did you forget I'm the symbol of our country, The best country and--yet-- Were you proud to see me waving? Did you stand and show your love Of our Country, Flag, and Freedom Blessed by the Good Lord above. I am proud of what I stand for, As I lead the grand parade; And you folks on the sidelines, If you salute, I've had it made. Those who march on with me, Their hearts swell with pride, For they fought for your Freedom, And there were others who fought and died. useful in development of U.S. energy policy. At that time, Jeffords had noted that by rough estimates, wood was assumed to provide at least 1.5 quads (quadrillion BTU's) of energy, surpassing hydro and nuclear energy in end use. He said the informational resources used in develop- ment of national energy policy were distorted by the lack of solid statistics, collected for all other major energy sources and published in government publications, particularly the Energy Department's Monthly Energy Review. A response to Jeffords' request from Energy Secretary James B. Edwards was released this week to members of the Wood Energy Caucus. Edwards said significant progress has been made in the difficult task of compiling statistics on wood energy use, and that preliminary estimates are now being subjected to review to assure their accuracy. However, Edwards revealed that the preliminary estimates for 1980 are that wood accounted for 2 to 2.5 quads of energy--between half a quad and a full quad more than previously estimated. "That is a significant amount, and we want to do a proper job before in- corporating these data into all of our energy summary publications," Edwards said in his statement. "We can assure you that the EIA (the Department's Energy Information Administration) Did you watch the parade this morning? Did you salute as I passed by? Did you show your Love of Country, "Live for Freedom or die"? Or do you take me just for granted? PLEASE, LET US NOT FORGET, I'M THE SYMBOL OF OUR COUNTRY, The best one, you can bet! Shirley McKean Haverhill Memorial VFW Auxiliary No. 5245 :. 'I Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton . ' The Dec. 23rd Governor and Council meeting was one of the more exciting meetings that we've had in some time. The Council approved a $4 million bond issue for the G.H Bass & Co. of Berlin for ex- pansion of the Bass Shoe plant. This plant will eventually employ some 500 people in the Berlin area. The Council also approved the findings for nine low head hydro dams in the state. Three in District One: Avery Dam in Laconia, Newfound Lake Dam in Bristol, and the Mascoma Lake Dam in Lebanon, all nine have been sent back to the Water Resources board for final hearings and selection of a developer who will actually lease the site and construct a hydro elect ric generating plant. The Governor and Council also approved Ihe final lease for the Pontook Hydro- Electric Project in Dummer. Mter many years of hearings and negotiations this project. I believe, will be of benefit to the northern electric needs. This facility will provide electricity for 7.700 homes, in- crease thi, acreage for wildlife habitat above the newly constructed dam. There will be a loss of about one mile of river for complete white water canoeing and perhaps some lessening of fishing, but I know several individuals who spent most of the winter of 1981 paying their electric bills. I firmly believe that it is not too much by ROBERT A. MICHENFELDER It's hard to keep your mouth shut these days. Every front page, every six o'clock news report carries some information that cries out for. if not a sharp comment, at least a snide remark As you can guess, its acid rain again, a subject that seems capable of raising hypocracy to new heights. Let's go back a few years to the creation of the New England Regional Commission. This was a major planning organization, funded by the federal government and ad- ministered by the six northeastern states. It wasn't a bad idea. It served as a means of channeling federal funds into the area in such a way as to make broad regional concerns the business of an ordered interstate body. If there were abuses, they were the "normal" ones expected in such operations. One of its brothers-in-arms was the New England River Basins Commission-- again federally funded with an ad- ministrative and financial commitment from those same states. Wheh the Reagan Administration put its budget cutting act together, both of these groups met the same fate and ceased to exist after October 1st. The New England Governor's Conference, recognizing immediately the loss it had suf- fered, had the good sense to "take over" both organizations. The result has been a broadened scope of responsibility for the Conference and the creation of a regional Water Resources Commission. This Commission is a recognition by the Governors that water and water related problems will be big items on any agenda for the future. As a result, much of the concerns of the old NERBC will be picked up by this new body. Now the kicker. Acid rain is one of the big concerns, as well it should be. The Governor's Conference has just received a preliminary report on a study that the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station will present some time in June of next year. The report finds that "naturally acidic soils" play a greater role in stream and lake acidification than acid precipilation, that the return of forest cover to former agricultural lands, ordinarily less acidic, is the culprit. For crying out loud. This reminds one of the learned "research institutes" paid for by the tobacco companies, that still maintain that there is no demonstrable connection between smoking and various cardio-pulmonary disorders. Any farmer will tell you that a few points on the ph scale often make the difference between a crop and a failure, between a profit and a catastrophe. With acid rain we are not talking about a few points--we are talking about a thousand times normal acidity. In the dead lakes of the Adirondacks and Canada (surrounded by woods since God put them together) we are finding acid increases on the scale of hundreds. Fortunately, not everybody is being taken in. The Chair- man of the Nc' Hampshire Pollution Control Commission is highly skeptical, noting that the National Science Foundation had found "circumstantial but overwhelming evidence that link acid rain and acidity in lakes and streams". The EPA and its Canadian counterpart have come to the same con- chmions. The problem for the researchers has been the inability to prove that a specific dab of sulphur dioxide from a specific smoke stack in central Ohio has associated with a specific rop of water under specific atmospheric conditions come the drop of acid that killed a specific rainbow trnut in Ihe Batten Kill, a series of facts and events that must be demonslrated before the courts or responsible bureaucracies feel free to act. It will be interesting to see how the Con- nectleut Agricultural Experiment Station has marshalled "'hard" evidence to prove all the others wrong. toask that one mile of many miles be given up for generating electrical power for the North Country. Much to his credit. Gov. Gallen stuck his neck out and joined in urging council members to act favorably on this project. As your Councilor, I have always been a strong supporter of small low head hydro power in the northern areas. The Council confirmed Donald Ladd of Colebrook to the Connecticut River Valley Flood Control Commission, Eugene B. Andes of Union to the Solid Waste Management Board, Julia Fifield of Orford to the State Historic Preservation Review Board, and Gerald Aikens of Berlin to the Board of Appeal. Peter ttance of Laconia was nominated to the Water Resources Board and William Anderson of Meredilh was nominated to the Youth Development Center Bpard. The Council also accepted and placed on file the Annual Reports of the Secretary of State's Office, the N.H. Crime Com- mission, and the Department of Safety. Anyone wishing copies of these reports, please write or call me, Ray Burton, RFD 1. Woodsville. N.H. 03785 {747-3662 and 271- ?,2.) The next Council meeting is scheduled for January 6. l0 a.m. at the State llouse. I would be honored to have you in attendance as it is an honor toserve yon and lhis district as a public official? during the Depression, Ricker had shipped a of chair stock worth furniture factory Massachusetts, but he got paid for it -- all he of it was one of the corn chairs, which he Raymond and Leena wedding present. The chair is still in use, in generation of Rickers. When the railroad out in 1956 it was a blow to Ricker Mill, but there other difficulties on horizon the the old mill and the of nearby forests. Ricker put up the for a new mill, but to get financing for the it, and finally old mill in 1963. Sources: Fa recollections and papers Leona Ricker: school paper by Alton Ricker, Mister Glover's Groton. Next week: Miller's has made conside progress in the devel of wood fuel informati plans to publish the d soon as is practical." Edwards said three had been authorized wil Department relating t fuel information. The "Wood Energy Data Requirements Study,' completed in July of thi The second, "Derek and Implementatio Historical Wood Cons Estimating Method0 /950-1980" iS nearinl[ pletxon. The third, Cd of 1981 Wood ConsUl Statistics," is in the p : stages. Jeffords said be i couraged' by t,h, p "---- being made in filli serious information v has hampered effort corporate wood fue! major component t energy policy." | He said legislative  relating to wood ene cluding his own long proposals for wood st credits, have been partly because of the "the solid informat have for every othe energy source." Jeffords said it is c; wood is the renewab[ source which "has greatest impact iv years in displacing f and has the greatest p with proper manager major component in/J to increase our toward energy indel in the immediate fut0 LaMott Vice Cha/r00 of Commi00 HAVERHILL--Rep LaMott, a Republican, has [ pointed by House\\; John B. Tucker to vice chairman of Appropriations Con Now serving his', in the House, Rep. I ...,_.. spent five terms , fluential Appr Committee and o vice chairman i} Committee on ' Veterans Affair currently chairnu the statutory Capi Oversight Commitl Appropriations R e j Transportatiold committee. | "It is reassurin[J[ know that the stall faithful,watchdog affairs, ' the spe r -- new vice chairman.. LaMott will fill tl: created when Rep.] Kidder, the fo chairman, was sl acting chairing] - Appropriations CoP[ October. [ LaMott is , mechanical con and his wife Muri. child, Mrs. Fredef  , Jr., of Arlington 14  p.- (