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Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
May 24, 1995     Journal Opinion
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May 24, 1995
 
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Page 8 -- JOURNAL OPINION- May 24, 1995 Ticklenaked origins unclear by Lacy Heath RYEGATE--Nestled in a valley off Route 302 in Ryegate is Ticklenaked Pond. Not too many people know that in town records it is also known as Witherspoon Lake, named after the Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon. who in- vested in land in Ryegate. He sold tracts of land to setders. He had a lot to do with the early religious history of the area. According to town records, the peo- ple wanted to name "the beautiful sheet of water, which, is embosomed among the hills of Ryegate" after him, but the town never voted to legally change the name. Ticklenaked Pond actually qualifies as a lake because it is 225 acres, but just like the name Witherspoon, the lake part never changed either. There is some speculation as to how Ticklenaked got its name. According to Dwight White of the Ryegate His- torical Society, one theory is that the name comes from the Algonquin In- dian name "Tickenecket" which means "the place of little beavers" (some translate it as "shimmering wat- er"). The word "Tickenecke(' was translated by the area white people to Ticklenaked. But whatever the name means, it is a wonderful place to spend a hot summer day. There is a public beach on the pond, which is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day, sunup to sundown. You can bring a picnic lunch or the fixings for a cookout There is a large picnic table and two grills. There are swings and a large teeter- totter for the kids to enjoy and two park benches to relax on. There is a bathroom facility on the premises during the season, which is big enough to change into swimming suits. T-shirts, hats and visors are availa- ble for sale by contacting Khdsline Elder at 584-3612 for more informa- tion. The money raised from he sale of these items helped improve the beach area. For directions or information, con- tact the Ryegate Town Clerk's office at 584-3880, SURPRISEI--Bradford logger Alan Thurston and his crew were hauling cut trees In the Bradford Municipal Forest, which is owned by the Bradford Water Com- mission but Is actually located In FaJrlee and West Faldee, on May 17 when they discovered three baby owls In a cavity In one of the trees. The three survived a half-mile drag, and Thurston Immediately called Or- ange County Forester Dave Paganelll. Paganelli sum- moned Mike Cox of the Vermont Institute of Natural Science in Woodstock, and Cox gently removed them from the tree, placed them In a carrying cage, and prepared to house them In an artificial nest that would be replaced In the location from which they came. Cox estimated the age of the barred owls at about four weeks; he said that If they were returned to the same location withIn a few days, the chances of the mother owl resuming care of them were excellent. At left, the owls peer nervously out of the tree; above, Cox removes one as Ryan Paganelll looks on. PHOTO BY CHARLES GLAZER It's float time in Woodsville and Wells River WOODSVILLE/WELLS RIVER-- The Woodsvflle/Wells River July 4th Parade will need lots of floats. The theme is Victory Remembered. Committee people include: arts and crafts, Sherry Foster (747- 2422); pa- rade chairman, Chades Smith (747- 3315); window display, Zellene Butt (747-3742); vendors, Paul Meyette (787-6270 or 787- 2400). Stub adden will be on display with his Napa race car on July 4. The next month's meeting will be June 5, 19 and 26 at Paul Meyette's of- . HAVERHILL (continued from page 1) garage; for Richard and Sherry Boutin to replace a smaller mobile home with a larger one; and to Donald and Virginia Kidder who want to cement their basement in their home, for which the board waived the fee because the project was below the cost limit. In another case, the board agreed to make a field trip, along with the road agent, to a home site on French Pond Road where a couple had proposed to put a mobile home and a garage. Member Rich Kinder posed the question as to whether the board has made a policy in the past of not ,granting building permits for homes on roads which receive no town service. Also, the board reworded a com- mitment to abate the interest on the 1992 taxes on a Smith mobile home on the condition that the owner would sell the unit and have it re- moved. There will be no meeting of the board on May 29 in observance of Memorial Day. STORK REPORT GRAND ISLE, VT--Catherine Butier Mongeon and Robert Mongeon of Grand Isle are pleased to report the birth of their daughter, Gwendola Ellen Mongeon, on May 15, 1995. Gwendolyn's maternal grandparents are Walter and Ida Butler of Corinth. NEWBURY--Barry and Jane Ertel of rice in North Haverhill. section was a Class 6 road. The EYEGLASS OUTLET Newbury welcomed daughter Mariah II IIII I IIIIIIIm I IIII III I 11, 1995. Mariah was born at Alice LEBANON & anon.PeckDayMemrialHspitalinLeb'*** NEWBURY--AIan and Nancy Leete WEST LEBANON I . III May We Be of Service To You? , Great Values ' Professional Services . All Major Brand Names s Huge Inventory . All Lens Styles North Country Plaza Rte 12A, W. Lebanon, NH Across from Friedly's (6031 298-8841 i of Newbury are proud to announce the birth of their son, Grant Larson Leete, on May 2, 1995. Grant was born at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon. $*$ PIERMONT -- James and Lisa Robinson of Piermont are pleased to report the birth of their son, Parker James Robinson. on April 26, 1995. Parker was born at Dartmouth-Hitch- cock Medical Center in Lebanon. $$$ THETFORD CENTER -- Kevin McEvoy and Susan Borotz of Thetford Center welcomed a daughter into the world on April 25, 1995, She GMc TRUCKS ,e A,t, Newl Stock # 5279 of Lebanon Now! 12,482 Save After All Incentives Stock # 155P 1994 Buick Century V6, Full Power NOW! $13,300 OR 8259.99 Md 1994 Oldsmobile Ciera V6, Full Power, Low Miles NOW! $13,800 OR S25Z58 MO.* *All With $2,000 Cash orTrade In With Your Good Credit, See Us For Details. No Responsibility For Typographical Errors Or Omissions was born at Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital in Lebanon. LYME--John and Kxisten Sweeney of Lyme are proud to announce the birth of their son, John Christopher Sweeney, on April 21, 1995. John was born at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medi- cal Center in Lebanon. $$$ VERSHIRE--Bob and Cathy Hodge of Vershire welcomed daughter Cassldy Lorraine Hodge into the world on April 24, 1995. Cassidy was born at Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital in Lebanon. I2-year-olds make nationals AMHERST, NH--The New Hampshire Upper Valley Girls AAU Basketball Club's 12-year-old team was selected to represent New Hampshire at the 1995 AAU 12 Year Old Girls Junior Olyumpic National Championships in July in Oklahoma City, OK. The team, which finished with a 5-2 record at the state tournament held at Souhegan High School Ls coached by Brent Southworth from Thefford and in- eludes Marlena Southworth from Thet- ford and Erica Sleeper from Fairlee. Seaside lie by S. Longfellow As rich in scenery as Vermont is, it still lacks one thing that every oth- er New England state has: ocean front. This was not always so. Right after the last great glaciation, about 12,000 years ago, ocean water flooded the Champlain Lowland via the St. Lawrence Valley and cre- ated the Champlain Sea. This is not some wild conjecture; the Champlain Sea left behind evi- dence of its existence in the form of beaches, shells, and even the skele- ton of a whale. While we can only imagine seaside Vermont, the men who occupied the area soon after the ice's retreat without a doubt fished in that salty body of water. So what happened? Why isn't Lake Champlain an arm of the Atlantic Ocean today? The answer has everything to do with buoyancy. The earth's outer crust floats upon the layer beneath it just like a ship on water. The great sheet of ice which covered New England to a depth of several miles weight a lot and caused New England to ride low in the layer beneath it, just like a heavily laden ship rides lower in the water than an empty ship does. hnnaediately after the great ice re- treated, the Atlantic flooded into the depressed Champlain Valley. How- ever, the land, relieved of the ice's great weight, slowly rebounded--or floated upward, to use the ship anal- ogyand the salt water retreated northward with the rise of the land. The land's rebound is impressive. By geologist's estimates, the Cham- plain Valley rebounded about 500 feet. It's interesting to note that the re- bound was not uniform throughout glaciated North America. Those areas at the edge of the ice's ad- vance were depressed less; those to- ward the center were depressed more. So it is that the Boston area rebounded only several tens of feet while the southern end of St. James bay may have rebounded as much as 1,000 feet. The Champlain Sea was not Ver- mont's only flirtation with ocean water. Evidence of other experi- ences abound in the state's many sedimentary and metamorphic rock formations. Most sedimentary rocks originate as material deposited in the shallow waters of continental margins. Vermont has such sedi- mentary rocks, chiefly in the form of shales or limestones. Perhaps the most interesting is the Dawn For- mation, located on Isle La Motte. Those particular limestones are the remains of the most ancient coral reefs known; 500 million years As for which has great heat and the earth, marble mont's best-known ble is fact, most of phosed "kind or another lion to say that many of its product of the Which Vermont's of the last 1,300 Vermont is made pieces of landsc North American three discret cycle Vermont er piece of the much of the rest behind when it deP lantic Ocean o[ million years ago. So even if landlocked, in a ra it has seen a lot whose to sa' sport ocean front Anyway, wheJ the building ses over a idea of political bels seems very tee ficial. Long afteJ our fleeting no are forgotten, surface that we will continue to tal mountains build continents collide. Corinth re travels to ! CORINTH--Cheryl  was among a group Lloyd sales reprcV cendy traveled on trip to Egypt. The 1 the largest group fi to visit Egypt in 199 several days in the, ro before flying to. day Nile cruise, wb the majestic ValleYS' Queens. She qualified fo 8i trip based u achievements in House of launched in 1975, sands of sales Small towns to portunity to see March through will take 3,000 sales training trips to including 200 waii, and 1,200 to W 0 M a. II'S H! I WILL THIS HARM MY By George D, Wilbanks, MD President, The American College of ObsteU'kSam Nearly all pregnant women worry about potential risks to their fetus during pregnancy. Here are some of the most commonly-asked questions: Should I avoid certain foods? Pro- per food handiing and tXel:mration are key to preventing listeriosis, a food- born illness that can cause miscar- riage, stillbirth, and other problems. The bacteria causing it are found in undercooked or unrefrigerated meats, unpasteurized cheeses, and agricul- tural products. So it's best to avoid soft cheeses and meats (unless reheated) from the deli counter. Wash hands, knives, and cutting boards after handling uncooked foods, and wash raw vegetables thoroughly. Experts generally recommend that you avoid eating fish caught in polluted waters. These waters can har- bor substances like mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which may impair fetal development and cause birth def,s. County or state health authorities can advise you about the quality of local waters. What about caffeine? There are no condusive data on caffeine's effects. For example, one 1993 study found no risk in moderate caffeine con- sumption (up to three cups of coffee per day), while another found that pregnant women who consumed as Now you can rent the 18-inch dish, DIRECTV , 200 channels, and the best digital satellite system you can get. Starting at about a dollar a day! Rent the best for less! Call today! CALL 800-301-0001 D ..: IGITAL ONE TELEVISION Your Source for DIRECT 9 Commerce Slreel, Williston, Vermont 05495 Office Hour,s: n - Fri 8:30 am - 8:30 pro, Sol 9 am -5 pm I1[I II I little as one and o fee per day dotd miscardag Err fion, by  L, feine altogether. " found not.only i ,. Can , " have m, '  the ed? Again, there_. studies on the 'lllon trtments. Ho.iL.V,.__ _., best to avoid che  are left on the ll#J.. sor00 00ugh'00q.! X'G wat do  J,aX workplace -hazard'L t, mercury, PCBs, ",II radiation are so,/" hazards; however, /," .- tates that you PeS.IalsK " paintt fertilizers,thinners (i'.8  old paint, whirl, and sec mdhand No fetal harm ed from oaosu minals. To rnir directly in front __..- least 18 aaches a term exposure to of the machine, Be sure to talk more informatic  other IX tential  gs" 00llll i Page 8 -- JOURNAL OPINION- May 24, 1995 Ticklenaked origins unclear by Lacy Heath RYEGATE--Nestled in a valley off Route 302 in Ryegate is Ticklenaked Pond. Not too many people know that in town records it is also known as Witherspoon Lake, named after the Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon. who in- vested in land in Ryegate. He sold tracts of land to setders. He had a lot to do with the early religious history of the area. According to town records, the peo- ple wanted to name "the beautiful sheet of water, which, is embosomed among the hills of Ryegate" after him, but the town never voted to legally change the name. Ticklenaked Pond actually qualifies as a lake because it is 225 acres, but just like the name Witherspoon, the lake part never changed either. There is some speculation as to how Ticklenaked got its name. According to Dwight White of the Ryegate His- torical Society, one theory is that the name comes from the Algonquin In- dian name "Tickenecket" which means "the place of little beavers" (some translate it as "shimmering wat- er"). The word "Tickenecke(' was translated by the area white people to Ticklenaked. But whatever the name means, it is a wonderful place to spend a hot summer day. There is a public beach on the pond, which is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day, sunup to sundown. You can bring a picnic lunch or the fixings for a cookout There is a large picnic table and two grills. There are swings and a large teeter- totter for the kids to enjoy and two park benches to relax on. There is a bathroom facility on the premises during the season, which is big enough to change into swimming suits. T-shirts, hats and visors are availa- ble for sale by contacting Khdsline Elder at 584-3612 for more informa- tion. The money raised from he sale of these items helped improve the beach area. For directions or information, con- tact the Ryegate Town Clerk's office at 584-3880, SURPRISEI--Bradford logger Alan Thurston and his crew were hauling cut trees In the Bradford Municipal Forest, which is owned by the Bradford Water Com- mission but Is actually located In FaJrlee and West Faldee, on May 17 when they discovered three baby owls In a cavity In one of the trees. The three survived a half-mile drag, and Thurston Immediately called Or- ange County Forester Dave Paganelll. Paganelli sum- moned Mike Cox of the Vermont Institute of Natural Science in Woodstock, and Cox gently removed them from the tree, placed them In a carrying cage, and prepared to house them In an artificial nest that would be replaced In the location from which they came. Cox estimated the age of the barred owls at about four weeks; he said that If they were returned to the same location withIn a few days, the chances of the mother owl resuming care of them were excellent. At left, the owls peer nervously out of the tree; above, Cox removes one as Ryan Paganelll looks on. PHOTO BY CHARLES GLAZER It's float time in Woodsville and Wells River WOODSVILLE/WELLS RIVER-- The Woodsvflle/Wells River July 4th Parade will need lots of floats. The theme is Victory Remembered. Committee people include: arts and crafts, Sherry Foster (747- 2422); pa- rade chairman, Chades Smith (747- 3315); window display, Zellene Butt (747-3742); vendors, Paul Meyette (787-6270 or 787- 2400). Stub adden will be on display with his Napa race car on July 4. The next month's meeting will be June 5, 19 and 26 at Paul Meyette's of- . HAVERHILL (continued from page 1) garage; for Richard and Sherry Boutin to replace a smaller mobile home with a larger one; and to Donald and Virginia Kidder who want to cement their basement in their home, for which the board waived the fee because the project was below the cost limit. In another case, the board agreed to make a field trip, along with the road agent, to a home site on French Pond Road where a couple had proposed to put a mobile home and a garage. Member Rich Kinder posed the question as to whether the board has made a policy in the past of not ,granting building permits for homes on roads which receive no town service. Also, the board reworded a com- mitment to abate the interest on the 1992 taxes on a Smith mobile home on the condition that the owner would sell the unit and have it re- moved. There will be no meeting of the board on May 29 in observance of Memorial Day. STORK REPORT GRAND ISLE, VT--Catherine Butier Mongeon and Robert Mongeon of Grand Isle are pleased to report the birth of their daughter, Gwendola Ellen Mongeon, on May 15, 1995. Gwendolyn's maternal grandparents are Walter and Ida Butler of Corinth. NEWBURY--Barry and Jane Ertel of rice in North Haverhill. section was a Class 6 road. The EYEGLASS OUTLET Newbury welcomed daughter Mariah II IIII I IIIIIIIm I IIII III I 11, 1995. Mariah was born at Alice LEBANON & anon.PeckDayMemrialHspitalinLeb'*** NEWBURY--AIan and Nancy Leete WEST LEBANON I . III May We Be of Service To You? , Great Values ' Professional Services . All Major Brand Names s Huge Inventory . All Lens Styles North Country Plaza Rte 12A, W. Lebanon, NH Across from Friedly's (6031 298-8841 i of Newbury are proud to announce the birth of their son, Grant Larson Leete, on May 2, 1995. Grant was born at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon. $*$ PIERMONT -- James and Lisa Robinson of Piermont are pleased to report the birth of their son, Parker James Robinson, on April 26, 1995. Parker was born at Dartmouth-Hitch- cock Medical Center in Lebanon. $$$ THETFORD CENTER -- Kevin McEvoy and Susan Borotz of Thetford Center welcomed a daughter into the world on April 25, 1995. She GMc TRUCKS ,e A,t, Newl Stock # 5279 of Lebanon Now! 12,482 Save After All Incentives Stock # 155P 1994 Buick Century V6, Full Power NOW! $13,300 OR 8259.99 Md 1994 Oldsmobile Ciera V6, Full Power, Low Miles NOW! $13,800 OR S25Z58 MO.* *All With $2,000 Cash orTrade In With Your Good Credit, See Us For Details. No Responsibility For Typographical Errors Or Omissions was born at Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital in Lebanon. LYME--John and Kxisten Sweeney of Lyme are proud to announce the birth of their son, John Christopher Sweeney. on April 21, 1995. John was born at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medi- cal Center in Lebanon. $$$ VERSHIRE--Bob and Cathy Hodge of Vershire welcomed daughter Cassldy Lorraine Hodge into the world on April 24, 1995. Cassidy was born at Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital in Lebanon. I2-year-olds make nationals AMHERST, NH--The New Hampshire Upper Valley Girls AAU Basketball Club's 12-year-old team was selected to represent New Hampshire at the 1995 AAU 12 Year Old Girls Junior Olyumpic National Championships in July in Oklahoma City, OK. The team, which finished with a 5-2 record at the state tournament held at Souhegan High School Ls coached by Brent Southworth from Thefford and in- eludes Marlena Southworth from Thet- ford and Erica Sleeper from Fairlee. Seaside lie by S. Longfellow As rich in scenery as Vermont is, it still lacks one thing that every oth- er New England state has: ocean front. This was not always so. Right after the last great glaciation, about 12,000 years ago, ocean water flooded the Champlain Lowland via the St. Lawrence Valley and cre- ated the Champlain Sea. This is not some wild conjecture; the Champlain Sea left behind evi- dence of its existence in the form of beaches, shells, and even the skele- ton of a whale. While we can only imagine seaside Vermont, the men who occupied the area soon after the ice's retreat without a doubt fished in that salty body of water. So what happened? Why isn't Lake Champlain an arm of the Atlantic Ocean today? The answer has everything to do with buoyancy. The earth's outer crust floats upon the layer beneath it just like a ship on water. The great sheet of ice which covered New England to a depth of several miles weight a lot and caused New England to ride low in the layer beneath it, just like a heavily laden ship rides lower in the water than an empty ship does. hnnaediately after the great ice re- treated, the Atlantic flooded into the depressed Champlain Valley. How- ever, the land, relieved of the ice's great weight, slowly rebounded--or floated upward, to use the ship anal- ogyand the salt water retreated northward with the rise of the land. The land's rebound is impressive. By geologist's estimates, the Cham- plain Valley rebounded about 500 feet. It's interesting to note that the re- bound was not uniform throughout glaciated North America. Those areas at the edge of the ice's ad- vance were depressed less; those to- ward the center were depressed more. So it is that the Boston area rebounded only several tens of feet while the southern end of St. James bay may have rebounded as much as 1,000 feet. The Champlain Sea was not Ver- mont's only flirtation with ocean water. Evidence of other experi- ences abound in the state's many sedimentary and metamorphic rock formations. Most sedimentary rocks originate as material deposited in the shallow waters of continental margins. Vermont has such sedi- mentary rocks, chiefly in the form of shales or limestones. Perhaps the most interesting is the Dawn For- mation, located on Isle La Motte. Those particular limestones are the remains of the most ancient coral reefs known; 500 million years As for which has great heat and the earth, marble mont's best-known ble is fact, most of phosed "kind or another lion to say that many of its product of the Which Vermont's of the last 1,300 Vermont is made pieces of landsc North American three discret cycle Vermont er piece of the much of the rest behind when it deP lantic Ocean o[ million years ago. So even if landlocked, in a ra it has seen a lot whose to sa' sport ocean front Anyway, wheJ the building ses over a idea of political bels seems very tee ficial. Long afteJ our fleeting no are forgotten, surface that we will continue to tal mountains build continents collide. Corinth re travels to ! CORINTH--Cheryl  was among a group Lloyd sales reprcV cendy traveled on trip to Egypt. The 1 the largest group fi to visit Egypt in 199 several days in the, ro before flying to. day Nile cruise, wb the majestic ValleYS' Queens. She qualified fo 8i trip based u achievements in House of launched in 1975, sands of sales Small towns to portunity to see March through will take 3,000 sales training trips to including 200 waii, and 1,200 to W 0 M a. II'S H! I WILL THIS HARM MY By George D, Wilbanks, MD President, The American College of ObsteU'kSam Nearly all pregnant women worry about potential risks to their fetus during pregnancy. Here are some of the most commonly-asked questions: Should I avoid certain foods? Pro- per food handiing and tXel:mration are key to preventing listeriosis, a food- born illness that can cause miscar- riage, stillbirth, and other problems. The bacteria causing it are found in undercooked or unrefrigerated meats, unpasteurized cheeses, and agricul- tural products. So it's best to avoid soft cheeses and meats (unless reheated) from the deli counter. Wash hands, knives, and cutting boards after handling uncooked foods, and wash raw vegetables thoroughly. Experts generally recommend that you avoid eating fish caught in polluted waters. These waters can har- bor substances like mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which may impair fetal development and cause birth def,s. County or state health authorities can advise you about the quality of local waters. What about caffeine? There are no condusive data on caffeine's effects. For example, one 1993 study found no risk in moderate caffeine con- sumption (up to three cups of coffee per day), while another found that pregnant women who consumed as Now you can rent the 18-inch dish, DIRECTV , 200 channels, and the best digital satellite system you can get. Starting at about a dollar a day! Rent the best for less! Call today! CALL 800-301-0001 D ..: IGITAL ONE TELEVISION Your Source for DIRECT 9 Commerce Slreel, Williston, Vermont 05495 Office Hour,s: n - Fri 8:30 am - 8:30 pro, Sol 9 am -5 pm I1[I II I little as one and o fee per day dotd miscardag Err fion, by  L, feine altogether. " found not.only i ,. Can , " have m, '  the ed? Again, there_. studies on the 'lllon trtments. Ho.iL.V,.__ _., best to avoid che  are left on the ll#J.. sor00 00ugh'00q.! X'G wat do  J,aX workplace -hazard'L t, mercury, PCBs, ",II radiation are so,/" hazards; however, /," .- tates that you PeS.IalsK " paintt fertilizers,thinners (i'.8  old paint, whirl, and sec mdhand No fetal harm ed from oaosu minals. To rnir directly in front __..- least 18 aaches a term exposure to of the machine, Be sure to talk more informatic  other IX tential  gs" 00llll i